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Immigration Law

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  • Debbie Raff
    Hi, I knew that the explanation mentioned with regarding children did not change in 1922. This was the year my dad was born and the year his father left for
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 31, 2004
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      Hi,
      I knew that the explanation mentioned with regarding children did not change in 1922. This was the year my dad was born and the year his father left for NY. By 1928, my grandfather had obtained citizenship. I just can't remember the year, but most likely 1927.

      My dad arrived in the U.S. with his mom and brother and sister in 1928. I now know that he was a citizen prior to his arrival. When I found my grandfather's papers, my dad is listed on the form. (as an aside, this showed me that my dad had a 3rd 'official' birthdate!!! The one he always celebrated, the one in a Polish Record Book, and the one his dad included in his naturalization information - - this became a family joke) I have a feeling my grandmother never did become a citizen, as she would have had to apply on her own by 1922.

      See information regarding the naturalization of children below.

      From 1790 to 1922, wives of naturalized men automatically became citizens. This also meant that an alien woman who married a U.S. citizen automatically became a citizen. (Conversely, an American woman who married an alien lost her U.S. citizenship, even if she never left the United States.) From 1790 to 1940, children under the age of 21 automatically became naturalized citizens upon the naturalization of their father. Unfortunately, however, names and biographical information about wives and children are rarely included in declarations or petitions filed before September 1906. For more information about women in naturalization records, see Marian L. Smith, "Women and Naturalization, ca. 1802-1940," Prologue: Quarterly of the National Archives, Vol. 30, No. 2 (Summer 1998): 146-153.




      From 1790 to 1922, wives of naturalized men automatically became citizens. This also meant that an alien woman who married a U.S. citizen automatically became a citizen. (Conversely, an American woman who married an alien lost her U.S. citizenship, even if she never left the United States.) From 1790 to 1940, children under the age of 21 automatically became naturalized citizens upon the naturalization of their father. Unfortunately, however, names and biographical information about wives and children are rarely included in declarations or petitions filed before September 1906. For more information about women in naturalization records, see Marian L. Smith, "Women and Naturalization, ca. 1802-1940," Prologue: Quarterly of the National Archives, Vol. 30, No. 2 (Summer 1998): 146-153.


      Debbie


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