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Benarz Bieniarz Bieniasz

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  • lOU mARCHUK
    Dennis, I always enjoy your e-mails. One of my best friends by way of Belgium, both of us are children of DPs is Richard (Ryszard) Bieniasz from whose father
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 1, 2007
      Dennis, I always enjoy your e-mails.

      One of my best friends by way of Belgium, both of us
      are children of DPs is Richard (Ryszard) Bieniasz from
      whose father Edward Bieniasz was from Debica, SE
      Poland. He still has family there.

      Im my case, Ludwik Marczuk became Louis Marchuk. I
      became frustrated with the American Friends calling me
      Ludwig and referring to me as the German. I had no
      problem with the German but did have an issue with
      Ludwig. As far as for Marczuk, American have a
      difficult time with the CZ note how many ways
      Czechoslovakia was spelled. Now with Marchuk, most of
      my friends spell it Marchuck, insisting that it is the
      way it sounds.



      An older Jewish friend, Mr.Finkelstein, was telling me
      a story about names:

      2 Jewish fellows were on their way to the US. They
      were practicing what little English they knew. When it
      came time to talk to the immigation officer, the
      Jewish could not remember what to say in English,
      pressed by the immigation officer as to his name , he
      blurted out Jakub and then said in Yiddish
      "Fergessen".

      On that day, he bacame Jacob Fregusson.

      By the way, my son likes the original spelling of
      Marczuk. He is looking into changing it back.

      Ludwik Marczuk
      Lou Marchuk

      lou marchuk



      ____________________________________________________________________________________
      Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
      http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
    • Dennis Benarz
      Hi Lou I have a special place in my heart for Debica. A little more than 100 years ago, it was several bricks buildings around a square, some businesses, Saint
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2007
        Hi Lou

        I have a special place in my heart for Debica. A little more than 100
        years ago, it was several bricks buildings around a square, some
        businesses, Saint Jadwiga Church, a synagogue, a post office, a
        public notary, an infantry barracks, a railway station, and a
        scattering of wooden shacks that the humble folks there called home.
        Today, it is a county seat of government, a city of 50,000 people, 5
        parishes, manufacturing plants, apartment buildings, the railway
        station, a strong internet presense, a McDonalds, and a history of
        perserverance and eventual triumph that the humble folks call their
        own.

        I have a brace of kinsmen buried in the parish cemetery just across
        the Wisloka River in nearby Straszecin. Only the graves from the last
        100 years or so remain marked. The older graves had been marked with
        wooden crosses, timber markers, and logs which lasted just a little
        longer than those folks buried beneath them. But everyone is still
        there, well sort of. The cemetery was consecrated by the Church, but
        sanctified by more than 700 years of interrments. So much has and
        will change, but this one place will forever remain an immutable,
        silent witness of the lives and times of our community. It is truly
        sacred soil.

        Although I have never stepped foot nor walked there (and, alas,
        probably never will), there's a special emotion that I reserve for
        Debica County - God's Favorite Potato Patch, the Garden of Eden in
        Poland. I think of it as "home".

        So, I tip my hat to Ryszard Bieniasz, yet another cousin who shares
        the same ancient common Bieniasz progenitor, and I thank you for
        introducing him to me. Unfortunately, we would never be able to link
        our Bieniasz family trees together because the surname is so old,
        more than 700 years old in this area of SE Poland, and so many
        records fell victim to the destructiveness of war. So far, the
        earliest mention of the surname Bieniasz involves a Bieniasz father
        and son, a judge and a castellan respectively, who lived just north
        of Tarnow in 1304 AD. (So writes Jan Dlugosz.) And that's no more
        than 20 miles from Debica. Just down the road a piece, so to speak.

        However, this reply has gotten somewhat sentimental and far too
        serious. On a happier note, my second cousin - Darek Bieniasz - was
        elected a Zyrakow Township trustee over the winter. (Gmina Zyrakow is
        the general area just across the Wisloka from Debica.) So, if your
        buddy Ryszard needs a parking ticket from Straszecin or Gora Motyczna
        fixed, I might be able to help. And watch your speed, most of the
        cops in Debica have radar.

        Czesc!

        Dionizy Bieniasz
        aka Wisloka Dude
        aka Dennis Benarz, Chicagoland USA


        --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, lOU mARCHUK
        <ludwik43a@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dennis, I always enjoy your e-mails.
        >
        > One of my best friends by way of Belgium, both of us
        > are children of DPs is Richard (Ryszard) Bieniasz from
        > whose father Edward Bieniasz was from Debica, SE
        > Poland. He still has family there.
        >
        > Im my case, Ludwik Marczuk became Louis Marchuk. I
        > became frustrated with the American Friends calling me
        > Ludwig and referring to me as the German. I had no
        > problem with the German but did have an issue with
        > Ludwig. As far as for Marczuk, American have a
        > difficult time with the CZ note how many ways
        > Czechoslovakia was spelled. Now with Marchuk, most of
        > my friends spell it Marchuck, insisting that it is the
        > way it sounds.
        >
        >
        >
        > An older Jewish friend, Mr.Finkelstein, was telling me
        > a story about names:
        >
        > 2 Jewish fellows were on their way to the US. They
        > were practicing what little English they knew. When it
        > came time to talk to the immigation officer, the
        > Jewish could not remember what to say in English,
        > pressed by the immigation officer as to his name , he
        > blurted out Jakub and then said in Yiddish
        > "Fergessen".
        >
        > On that day, he bacame Jacob Fregusson.
        >
        > By the way, my son likes the original spelling of
        > Marczuk. He is looking into changing it back.
        >
        > Ludwik Marczuk
        > Lou Marchuk
        >
        > lou marchuk
        >
        >
        >
        >
        ______________________________________________________________________
        ______________
        > Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
        > http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
        >
      • krupniak
        ... They have words such as chuck roast, chuck waggon, etc. in their brains. _______ Lavrentiy
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 2, 2007
          lOU mARCHUK wrote:
          >
          > Dennis, I always enjoy your e-mails.
          >
          > One of my best friends by way of Belgium, both of us
          > are children of DPs is Richard (Ryszard) Bieniasz from
          > whose father Edward Bieniasz was from Debica, SE
          > Poland. He still has family there.
          >
          > Im my case, Ludwik Marczuk became Louis Marchuk. I
          > became frustrated with the American Friends calling me
          > Ludwig and referring to me as the German. I had no
          > problem with the German but did have an issue with
          > Ludwig. As far as for Marczuk, American have a
          > difficult time with the CZ note how many ways
          > Czechoslovakia was spelled. Now with Marchuk, most of
          > my friends spell it Marchuck, insisting that it is the
          > way it sounds.



          They have words such as chuck roast, chuck waggon, etc. in their
          brains.


          _______

          Lavrentiy
        • krupniak
          ... ******* If caught by radar just inform police that you are an American and don t know much. ______ Lavrentiy /
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 2, 2007
            Dennis Benarz wrote:


            > And watch your speed, most of the cops in Debica have radar.



            *******

            If caught by radar just inform police that you are an American and
            don't know much.


            ______

            Lavrentiy


            /
          • amiak27
            There are several countries where they fine you on the spot. One of the tricks to assure you are not donating money to Policeman Personal Family Fund is to
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 2, 2007
              There are several countries where they fine you on the spot. One of
              the 'tricks' to assure you are not donating money to Policeman
              Personal Family Fund is to demand a receipt for the fine you pay.
              They will hand you some paper receipts that look like they are printed
              on flimsy paper, but that is standard.

              Years ago it cost me $2.85 for doing 30km over the limit in Lithuania.
              I didn't know the limit was different on the unfinished portion...
              that is the one time I had a hard time keeping a straight face.

              The Czechs made up for that with a $20 fine for what passed as a speed
              trap & just about traveling with traffic.

              Ron

              --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "krupniak"
              <Lkrupnak@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dennis Benarz wrote:
              >
              >
              > > And watch your speed, most of the cops in Debica have radar.
              >
              >
              >
              > *******
              >
              > If caught by radar just inform police that you are an American and
              > don't know much.
              >
              >
              > ______
              >
              > Lavrentiy
              >
              >
              > /
              >
            • grecko1
              Hi Lou, My grandfather in Poland also went by the name of Ludwik(louis). It wasn t to many years ago that I realised with great delight, that Ludwika was
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 2, 2007
                Hi Lou,

                My grandfather in Poland also went by the name of Ludwik(louis). It wasn't
                to many years ago that I realised with great delight, that Ludwika was
                actually Polish for Louise. I must say my wife with Anglo background
                strongly prefers to be called Louise.



                I apologise in advance to anyone out there that may be called Ludwika - I
                think that I may have watched too many cartoons over the years portraying
                the German Scientist Ludvig



                Regards,



                Steven Grzegorczyn



                _____

                From: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of lOU mARCHUK
                Sent: Saturday, June 02, 2007 9:55 AM
                To: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Galicia_Poland-Ukraine] Benarz Bieniarz Bieniasz



                Dennis, I always enjoy your e-mails.

                One of my best friends by way of Belgium, both of us
                are children of DPs is Richard (Ryszard) Bieniasz from
                whose father Edward Bieniasz was from Debica, SE
                Poland. He still has family there.

                Im my case, Ludwik Marczuk became Louis Marchuk. I
                became frustrated with the American Friends calling me
                Ludwig and referring to me as the German. I had no
                problem with the German but did have an issue with
                Ludwig. As far as for Marczuk, American have a
                difficult time with the CZ note how many ways
                Czechoslovakia was spelled. Now with Marchuk, most of
                my friends spell it Marchuck, insisting that it is the
                way it sounds.

                An older Jewish friend, Mr.Finkelstein, was telling me
                a story about names:

                2 Jewish fellows were on their way to the US. They
                were practicing what little English they knew. When it
                came time to talk to the immigation officer, the
                Jewish could not remember what to say in English,
                pressed by the immigation officer as to his name , he
                blurted out Jakub and then said in Yiddish
                "Fergessen".

                On that day, he bacame Jacob Fregusson.

                By the way, my son likes the original spelling of
                Marczuk. He is looking into changing it back.

                Ludwik Marczuk
                Lou Marchuk

                lou marchuk

                __________________________________________________________
                Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
                http://searchmarket <http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/> ing.yahoo.com/





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