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STEFURA

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  • aburock
    Stefura is the maiden name of my dad s dad s mom. I saw a notation on a website that it doesn t have an especially pleasant meaning, but it didn t say what the
    Message 1 of 10 , May 1, 2007
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      Stefura is the maiden name of my dad's dad's mom. I saw a notation on a
      website that it doesn't have an especially pleasant meaning, but it
      didn't say what the translation is. If anyone know I'd be grateful to
      learn the meaning. Whatever the truth is, I can take it -- my last name
      means red beet! Thanks, Amy
    • Dennis Benarz
      Hi Red Beet! The word stefura does not appear in any one of my three Polish- English dictionaries (Pogonowski, Langenscheidt s, and PWN Oxford). The closest
      Message 2 of 10 , May 1, 2007
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        Hi Red Beet!

        The word "stefura" does not appear in any one of my three Polish-
        English dictionaries (Pogonowski, Langenscheidt's, and PWN Oxford). The
        closest word to "stefura" is "stefanka" (in "PWN Oxford, Wielki Slownik
        Polsko-Angielski", Warsaw, 2006), and I wouldn't consider "stefanka"
        unpleasant unless you dislike a layered sponge cake filled with cream
        and often topped with chocolate icing.

        I suspect that the surname STEFURA stems from the first name STEFAN.
        And I've never had an unpleasant experience with any of the various
        Steves that I've known.

        An especially unpleasant meaning? None that I can find in Polish.
        Perhaps "stefura" is a local colloquial term (slang) used somewhere by
        only a limited number of people. Or perhaps the source where you found
        the "stefura" comment is referring to its meaning in another language.

        I'm stumped. Go figure.

        Dennis



        --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "aburock" <aburock@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Stefura is the maiden name of my dad's dad's mom. I saw a notation on
        a
        > website that it doesn't have an especially pleasant meaning, but it
        > didn't say what the translation is. If anyone know I'd be grateful to
        > learn the meaning. Whatever the truth is, I can take it -- my last
        name
        > means red beet! Thanks, Amy
        >
      • aburock
        The sponge cake sounds delicious -- particularly since I am trying to diet! I ll try to remember where I saw the reference to the name and post more details.
        Message 3 of 10 , May 1, 2007
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          The sponge cake sounds delicious -- particularly since I am trying to
          diet! I'll try to remember where I saw the reference to the name and
          post more details. Thanks for investigating the question for me.
          Sincerely, Red Beet
        • aburock
          Okay -- I tracked down the reference -- it s: http://lemko.org/genealogy/krasovskiy/intro.html -- it describes a certain type of name ending as impolite and
          Message 4 of 10 , May 1, 2007
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            Okay -- I tracked down the reference -- it's:
            http://lemko.org/genealogy/krasovskiy/intro.html -- it describes a
            certain type of name ending as "impolite" and includes "Stepura" in
            this category -- but I don't understand why. Let me know what you
            think! Thanks, Amy
          • krupniak
            Fred Hoffman will be able to comment on Ivan Ivan Krasovs kyj s observation, which was: One peculiarity of these names is that each could be given to a person
            Message 5 of 10 , May 2, 2007
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              Fred Hoffman will be able to comment on Ivan Ivan Krasovs'kyj's
              observation, which was:


              One peculiarity of these names is that each could be given to a
              person on the basis of his given name, or on the basis of the given
              name of one's father (if the father was Vasyl', then his son is
              Vasylyk.) Personal names with word endings, bearing a somewhat
              impolite connotation were much less common among Lemkos. Examples of
              surnames of this type (using the endings -yha, - ura, -yura, -ur, -
              unda, -ysko, and -ach) include: Vanyha, Fedoryha, Demura, Matsura,
              Stepura, Fetsyura, Yatsura, Demchur, Tymchur, Klymunda, Kostysko,
              Petrysko, Romanysko, Semanysko, and Klymach


              ________


              Lavrentiy




              aburock wrote:
              >
              > Okay -- I tracked down the reference -- it's:
              > http://lemko.org/genealogy/krasovskiy/intro.html -- it describes a
              > certain type of name ending as "impolite" and includes "Stepura"
              in
              > this category -- but I don't understand why. Let me know what you
              > think! Thanks, Amy
              >
            • amiak27
              Thanks for the reference, it is interesting to read. I have encountered two points that I consider weaknesses so far, the first the one on impolite names.
              Message 6 of 10 , May 2, 2007
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                Thanks for the reference, it is interesting to read. I have
                encountered two points that I consider weaknesses so far, the first
                the one on 'impolite' names. I feel strongly the author has the
                obligation to identify what makes the names 'impolite', so the reader
                can tell if the basis may be a vulgarism, simply a diminutive, a
                vulgar body function or perhaps an animal part. One example, from the
                Jewish/German, is "Greenspan" or "Copper Corrosion". Why not be
                straight about it? The second is seeing that "Biskup" is identified
                as Roman Catholic bishop. I have doubts about that. If celebacy was
                not held to, then I would not expect an illegitimate child to be named
                after the Bishop. Rather, I would expect it more readily from
                theOrthodox or Uniat - although married priests were not permitted to
                become bishops. That could use better clarification.

                Ron

                --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "aburock" <aburock@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Okay -- I tracked down the reference -- it's:
                > http://lemko.org/genealogy/krasovskiy/intro.html -- it describes a
                > certain type of name ending as "impolite" and includes "Stepura" in
                > this category -- but I don't understand why. Let me know what you
                > think! Thanks, Amy
                >
              • Fred Hoffman
                Hi, Amy was asking about the name STEFURA and the reference at http://lemko.org/genealogy/krasovskiy/intro.html which describes this sort of name as
                Message 7 of 10 , May 2, 2007
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                  Hi,

                  Amy was asking about the name STEFURA and the
                  reference at
                  http://lemko.org/genealogy/krasovskiy/intro.html
                  which describes this sort of name as "impolite."
                  She wanted to know why it was impolite.

                  If I understand this correctly, it's not that
                  STEFURA or STEPURA means anything negative. Both
                  were formed by taking Stef- or Step- from the
                  given names Stefan or Stepan, in English
                  Sgteven/Stephen, and adding the ending -ura. I
                  believe the point being made here is that these
                  surnames came from nicknames, and nicknames in the
                  form X-ura were not terribly flattering. We don't
                  have anything exactly like that in English, but
                  maybe I can illustrate with my own name.

                  I go by my middle name, which is Frederick, except
                  of course everyone uses the short form, Fred. I'm
                  perfectly OK with that -- but I'd have a problem
                  with anyone who insisted on calling me "Freddy."
                  It's not that you can look "Freddy" up in a
                  dictionary and find that it means anything bad; it
                  just rubs me the wrong way. It would be impolite
                  to call me that, especially once you realized I
                  didn't like it. Similarly, you wouldn't call a
                  John "Johnny" unless you were sure it was OK with
                  him. Going up to President Bush and calling him
                  "Georgie" would probably get you surrounded by
                  Secret Service agents. Some nicknames just come
                  across as being rude or inappopriate, implying "I
                  don't have to be polite to you because you can't
                  make me, nyah-nyah- nyah, nyah, nyah."

                  In English we have only a very few endings we add
                  to form nicknames, mainly -y and -ie. Many adults
                  object to being called by nicknames ending in -y
                  or -ie because we feel they're only appropriate
                  for children (although I hated being called
                  "Freddy" even when I was a kid). Ukrainian and
                  Polish and Lemko and Rusyn and all these other
                  Slavic languages have a large variety of endings
                  that can be added to form nicknames or secondary
                  names that developed into surnames. Some have
                  clearcut meanings, such as -ovych or -uk, "son
                  of"; others are augmentative, like saying "Big
                  John" in English, and some are diminutive, like
                  saying "Little John" or "Johnny." Some don't
                  really have a obvious, well defined meaning; but
                  they do have a connotation, a shade of meaning
                  that comes with them. I think Krasovskiy is saying
                  STEPURA is kind of an unfriendly, impolite
                  nickname to use for a Stefan or Stepan. It's not
                  really bad, and who knows -- maybe a Stepura
                  ancestor didn't really mind being called that. But
                  by and large, X-ura names started out as nicknames
                  that weren't really very polite ways of referring
                  to someone.

                  The people called by these names probably weren't
                  wild about it; but there are lots and lots of
                  surnames that surely were hated by the people who
                  got stuck with them. STEFURA doesn't seem so bad
                  by comparison with some names I've seen, which can
                  only be translated with four-letter words in
                  English. Those are names that definitely do mean
                  something rude. STEFURA or STEPURA would be more
                  like calling a person "Stevie" when you know he
                  doesn't like it.

                  That's my understanding of the situation. I hope
                  it helps clarify things a little.

                  Fred Hoffman
                  Author, _Polish Surnames: Origins & Meanings_
                • Fred Hoffman
                  Hi, ... I understand what you re saying. Still, the author clearly identified these specific names as coming from personal given names, and says they were
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 2, 2007
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                    Hi,

                    Ron (amiak27) wrote:

                    > Thanks for the reference, it is interesting to
                    > read. I have
                    > encountered two points that I consider
                    > weaknesses so far, the first
                    > the one on 'impolite' names. I feel strongly the
                    > author has the
                    > obligation to identify what makes the names
                    > 'impolite', so the reader
                    > can tell if the basis may be a vulgarism, simply
                    > a diminutive, a
                    > vulgar body function or perhaps an animal part.
                    > One example, from the
                    > Jewish/German, is "Greenspan" or "Copper
                    > Corrosion". Why not be
                    > straight about it?

                    I understand what you're saying. Still, the author
                    clearly identified these specific names as coming
                    from personal given names, and says they were
                    "somewhat impolite" -- not obscene, not body
                    functions or animal parts. They developed from
                    nicknames that were not terribly polite. It's like
                    the difference between calling your father "Dad"
                    and calling him "Pops" or "Old Man"; one is
                    reasonably polite, the others not so much. I think
                    Krasovskiy also assumed his readers would
                    recognize the connections between these names and
                    the given names they came from, and thus would
                    have known they weren't likely to refer to
                    anything vulgar.

                    This is always a problem for an author: you have
                    to ask yourself "How much can I expect my readers
                    to know without my spelling it all out?" I must
                    tell you from personal experience, it is
                    IMPOSSIBLE for an author writing on names to
                    include everything he wants to say -- and if he
                    did, the introduction to the book alone would be
                    60 volumes. You always have to juggle the need to
                    explain things with the need to keep the length of
                    the book or article under control. There comes a
                    point where you just have to draw the line and say
                    "I've given them a good start. Let them figure the
                    rest of it out for themselves."

                    > The second is seeing that "Biskup" is identified
                    > as Roman Catholic bishop. I have doubts about
                    > that. If celebacy was
                    > not held to, then I would not expect an
                    > illegitimate child to be named
                    > after the Bishop. Rather, I would expect it more
                    > readily from
                    > theOrthodox or Uniat - although married priests
                    > were not permitted to
                    > become bishops. That could use better
                    > clarification.

                    I used to wonder about this. But let me quote
                    Hanks and Hodges _A Dictionary of Surnames_. Their
                    entry for the English surname BISHOP ends: "The
                    word came to be applied as a surname for a variety
                    of reasons, among them service in the household of
                    a bishop, supposed resemblance in bearing or
                    appearance to a bishop, and selection as the 'boy
                    bishop' on St. Nicholas's Day."

                    So the surname BISKUP doesn't mean an ancestor was
                    a naughty bishop, just as the English surname KING
                    doesn't mean you're royal. It means an ancestor
                    was somehow connected with a bishop, or reminded
                    people of a bishop. He may have lived on land
                    owned by a bishop, for instance; I think that was
                    often what this name referred to. Or maybe he
                    looked like the local bishop. Or maybe he made a
                    big show of how pious he was and went around
                    ordering the sinners to do this or that. These are
                    all plausible ways a person might end up being
                    called BISKUP or BISKUPSKI.

                    As I say, that used to puzzle me, till I finally
                    heard an explanation that made sense to me. I
                    thought I'd pass it along.

                    Fred Hoffman
                    Author, _Polish Surnames: Origins & Meanings_
                  • aburock
                    Thanks all for the fascinating and clear explanation. I really appreciate the info! Amy
                    Message 9 of 10 , May 2, 2007
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                      Thanks all for the fascinating and clear explanation. I really
                      appreciate the info! Amy
                    • amiak27
                      Thanks Fred, Your two postings did clarify things, or as you say, present plausible reasons. An author or speaker is obligated to address his audience, but in
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 2, 2007
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                        Thanks Fred,

                        Your two postings did clarify things, or as you say, present plausible
                        reasons. An author or speaker is obligated to address his audience,
                        but in a group of mixed background (or a group not originally
                        addressed) it would be easy to loose them.

                        Ron

                        --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Hoffman"
                        <WFHoffman@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi,
                        >
                        > Ron (amiak27) wrote:
                        >
                        > > Thanks for the reference, it is interesting to
                        > > read. I have
                        > > encountered two points that I consider
                        > > weaknesses so far, the first
                        > > the one on 'impolite' names. I feel strongly the
                        > > author has the
                        > > obligation to identify what makes the names
                        > > 'impolite', so the reader
                        > > can tell if the basis may be a vulgarism, simply
                        > > a diminutive, a
                        > > vulgar body function or perhaps an animal part.
                        > > One example, from the
                        > > Jewish/German, is "Greenspan" or "Copper
                        > > Corrosion". Why not be
                        > > straight about it?
                        >
                        > I understand what you're saying. Still, the author
                        > clearly identified these specific names as coming
                        > from personal given names, and says they were
                        > "somewhat impolite" -- not obscene, not body
                        > functions or animal parts. They developed from
                        > nicknames that were not terribly polite. It's like
                        > the difference between calling your father "Dad"
                        > and calling him "Pops" or "Old Man"; one is
                        > reasonably polite, the others not so much. I think
                        > Krasovskiy also assumed his readers would
                        > recognize the connections between these names and
                        > the given names they came from, and thus would
                        > have known they weren't likely to refer to
                        > anything vulgar.
                        >
                        > This is always a problem for an author: you have
                        > to ask yourself "How much can I expect my readers
                        > to know without my spelling it all out?" I must
                        > tell you from personal experience, it is
                        > IMPOSSIBLE for an author writing on names to
                        > include everything he wants to say -- and if he
                        > did, the introduction to the book alone would be
                        > 60 volumes. You always have to juggle the need to
                        > explain things with the need to keep the length of
                        > the book or article under control. There comes a
                        > point where you just have to draw the line and say
                        > "I've given them a good start. Let them figure the
                        > rest of it out for themselves."
                        >
                        > > The second is seeing that "Biskup" is identified
                        > > as Roman Catholic bishop. I have doubts about
                        > > that. If celebacy was
                        > > not held to, then I would not expect an
                        > > illegitimate child to be named
                        > > after the Bishop. Rather, I would expect it more
                        > > readily from
                        > > theOrthodox or Uniat - although married priests
                        > > were not permitted to
                        > > become bishops. That could use better
                        > > clarification.
                        >
                        > I used to wonder about this. But let me quote
                        > Hanks and Hodges _A Dictionary of Surnames_. Their
                        > entry for the English surname BISHOP ends: "The
                        > word came to be applied as a surname for a variety
                        > of reasons, among them service in the household of
                        > a bishop, supposed resemblance in bearing or
                        > appearance to a bishop, and selection as the 'boy
                        > bishop' on St. Nicholas's Day."
                        >
                        > So the surname BISKUP doesn't mean an ancestor was
                        > a naughty bishop, just as the English surname KING
                        > doesn't mean you're royal. It means an ancestor
                        > was somehow connected with a bishop, or reminded
                        > people of a bishop. He may have lived on land
                        > owned by a bishop, for instance; I think that was
                        > often what this name referred to. Or maybe he
                        > looked like the local bishop. Or maybe he made a
                        > big show of how pious he was and went around
                        > ordering the sinners to do this or that. These are
                        > all plausible ways a person might end up being
                        > called BISKUP or BISKUPSKI.
                        >
                        > As I say, that used to puzzle me, till I finally
                        > heard an explanation that made sense to me. I
                        > thought I'd pass it along.
                        >
                        > Fred Hoffman
                        > Author, _Polish Surnames: Origins & Meanings_
                        >
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