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Re: Some Useful Information About The Immigrant Experience

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  • krupniak
    Biddy provided: There is a book which you may have in your Libraries re: the Emigration Business in Bremen and Hamburg etc. It is called Fame, Fortune and
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 4, 2006
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      Biddy provided:


      There is a book which you may have in your Libraries re: the
      Emigration Business in Bremen and Hamburg etc.

      It is called "Fame, Fortune and Sweet Liberty" - the great European
      emigration - edited by Dirk Hoerder and Diethelm Knauf, Bremen. 1992
      Edition Temmen
      Hohenlohstr. 21 - 2800 Bremen 1 - Germany
      ISBN. 3 - 926958 - 96 - 0 (English Edition)

      Many things changed for steerage passengers when steamships replaced
      the sailing ships, a process that was complete by 1870's on the North
      Atlantic routes. With steamships the journey lasted less than 3
      weeks ( 17 days on average) The advantages of shorter travel times -
      fresher provisions would have improved passenger meals and illnesses
      would have been less life -threatening than on voyages lasting
      several weeks.



      >
      > Karen Hobb wrote:
      >
      >
      > You can use websites like: http://www.theseverts.net/early.htm
      >
      > That website also has a lot of good information on the life of
      > immigrants
      > once they got to the US.
      >
      > Frank Soural has written about how they traveled by land to get to
      a
      > port.
      > During the 1860s the Austrian lands were just beginning to get
      rail
      > transport. I believe Pilsen and Prague were connected around 1866.
      >
      > Wikepedia has an article about Batlimore's port of entry.
      >
      > The book "The Uprooted" is another very good one that may have a
      lot
      > of the
      > information you are looking for. I recommend that book to anyone
      who
      > wants
      > to understand why they came.
      >
      > I believe that by 1870 or so Baltimore port had passenger trains
      that
      > waited
      > in the port near where passengers would land so they could board
      trains
      > right away.
      >
      > Trains did not get to Fairfax MN until 1872. Before then,
      immigrants
      > took
      > trains as far as possible and then took wagon or river transport
      to New
      > Ulm or
      > another destination..
      >
      > You need to get a copy of the right volume of Merchant Sail which
      > should be
      > in the reference section of a good library near you. I believe
      volume
      > 7 is
      > for the 19th century.
      >
      > There are many descriptions of ships (with pictures), their ports,
      and
      > the
      > voyages they took. There are descriptions of rescues of
      passengers
      > from
      > gounded ships and or terrible storms. The size of each ship is
      given
      > and there
      > may be something about how many passengers it could carry, too.
      >
      > Some of the text is from journals of travelers and of ships crews.
      >
      > Merchant Sail is a good reference for anyone doing genealogical
      > research.
      > The book is widely distributed in the US and any good reference
      library
      > should have it. Some may have it in their circulating
      collection and
      > others
      > may have it in their reference section.
      >
      > The period you are asking about was a transition period between sail
      > and
      > steam assisted sail. You can also follow that transition in
      Merchant
      > Sail.
      >
      > Sailing ships were cheaper to build and were used to carry bulky
      cargo
      > like
      > lumber for years after steam took over for passenger ships.
      >
      > In 1864 the first Monitor Class iron clad sailing vessels or steam
      > assisted
      > vessels were engaged against each other in the war in Denmark. I
      > don't
      > believe there were any iron plates used on merchat ships that early.
      >
      > The Clipper ships / Packet ships were fast sailing vessels and some
      of
      > them
      > were still carrying passengers in 1850s and there may still have
      been a
      > few
      > making the crossing in the 1860s but I suspect that most of our
      > ancestors were
      > carried on steam assisted sailing ships or what may have been called
      > sail
      > assisted steamers in those days.
      >
      > All the documentaries and dramas I have seen of passage on a sailing
      > ship
      > showed a hammock-like bunk for each passenger that would swing with
      the
      > sideways
      > movement of the ship. Fancier quarters had beds or bunks with
      high
      > side
      > rails to keep the passenger from falling out.
      >
      > The passage, if I recall, cost about $33 a person in the 1860s --
      that
      > would
      > be for the cheapest berth. That may have been for a winter
      crossing
      > which was cold and stormy and often took longer than crossings
      later in
      > the year
      > because of the weather. The accommodations were pretty dreadful
      for
      > people
      > who could not afford a cabin and you can learn about a lot of it
      with
      > Internet searches.
      >
      > There is also a Time-Life book about the immigrant ships but it may
      > cover
      > crossings later than 1870.. However the descriptions of life on a
      ship
      > may still
      > have a lot in common with the earlier crossings.
      >
      > There is some history at:
      _http://www.pbs.org/lostliners/ocean.html_
      > (http://www.pbs.org/lostliners/ocean.html)
      >
      > A good search string is: evolution from sail to steam.
      >
      > There are a number of diaries of immigrants in our libraries. I
      found
      > one
      > narrative of a crossing by a Jewish family in about 1895 that
      described
      > the
      > day to day life below decks and the accommodations they had. I
      found
      > that
      > book in the juvenile section of our library.
      >
      > I suspect that the accommodations on a ship in 1895 were a bit
      > different
      > than they were in 1860-1870. If you look at some of the passenger
      > lists on the
      > Internet you will see that many ships did not carry all that many
      > passengers, even during the nicer months of the year.
      >
      > There is a map of immigrant ships routes on the Internet. We
      talked
      > about
      > it on the list quite some time ago -- maybe more than a year ago.
      > That map
      > also had an advertisement of cost of passage in various
      accommodation
      > grades. If you cannot find any other information on the cost of
      > passage
      > try a web search.
      >
      > Karen
      >
    • cgwedge@aol.com
      Concerning the later (after steamships came into common use for immigration) immigrant experience: having just located the information on the arrival of my
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 5, 2006
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        Concerning the later (after steamships came into common use for immigration)
        immigrant experience: having just located the information on the arrival of my
        grandmother, father and uncle in 1914, it seems the information that is
        posted on this list about the "average" experience on steamships fits my family
        pretty well.

        Their journey was on the SS Main, a German steamship --in its third
        incarnation--and they departed from Breman, Germany on 3/19/14, arriving at the Port of
        Baltimore on 4/06/14, a journey that appears to have lasted exactly 17 days
        as described in this last posting.

        My father remembered the train station(s) of the day. While he did not say
        that this was in Baltimore, his impression was of huge circular passenger
        benches in the great station, each round seating bench covered with plush red
        velvet! (He was a very young child.)

        (Another vague memory he had--and I cannot say it is related to Baltimore--is
        of the massive fire- horses drawing the great firewagons and the sound of
        these great workhorses' hooves striking on cobblestone pavement. He described
        this memory complete with the visual of much flashing color, including the
        horse's harnesses mostly reds, golds and whites. Surely a child's perspective.
        Someday it would be interesting to track down the real details of firewagons in
        1914. )

        The family story was that as the ship steamed into Baltimore harbor , the
        passengers were all on deck, and my father, dressed in a sailor suit, waving an
        American flag and sang, child-like, over and over, in Ukranian, "God bless us,
        God bless us, God bless us."

        I never could understand how the family got a sailor suit to put on this
        Galician child, or an American flag for him to flap. They seemed made-up details.
        However, I happened to read on a website I visited after learning the
        documented specifics of their arrival, that often family already in the North American
        continent would save up money and send "Western clothes" over to Eastern
        Europe ahead of the trip so that their relatives would "fit in" more nearly as
        they disembarked from their ships. It stands to reason that an American flag
        might also be sent as almost a "talisman", evidincing the immigrants' goodwill
        and intention to embrace their intended new county.

        I have posted in the files and photos some specifics of this particular
        immigrant experience for those who might want to take a look.

        Catherine


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Marilyn Hertenstein
        Thank you Catherine for posting this! My grandfather, Wasyl Bilan, came over on the Main just a couple of years earlier and landed in Baltimore. We know
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 5, 2006
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          Thank you Catherine for posting this! My grandfather, Wasyl Bilan, came
          over on the Main just a couple of years earlier and landed in Baltimore. We
          know nothing of his passage or arrival or how he got to Rankin,
          Pennsylvania, but with your descriptions, I can now imagine. Thanks.

          Marilyn

          _____

          From: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of cgwedge@...
          Sent: Sunday, November 05, 2006 7:44 AM
          To: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Galicia_Poland-Ukraine] Re: Some Useful Information About The
          Immigrant Experience



          Concerning the later (after steamships came into common use for immigration)

          immigrant experience: having just located the information on the arrival of
          my
          grandmother, father and uncle in 1914, it seems the information that is
          posted on this list about the "average" experience on steamships fits my
          family
          pretty well.

          Their journey was on the SS Main, a German steamship --in its third
          incarnation--and they departed from Breman, Germany on 3/19/14, arriving at
          the Port of
          Baltimore on 4/06/14, a journey that appears to have lasted exactly 17 days
          as described in this last posting.

          My father remembered the train station(s) of the day. While he did not say
          that this was in Baltimore, his impression was of huge circular passenger
          benches in the great station, each round seating bench covered with plush
          red
          velvet! (He was a very young child.)

          (Another vague memory he had--and I cannot say it is related to
          Baltimore--is
          of the massive fire- horses drawing the great firewagons and the sound of
          these great workhorses' hooves striking on cobblestone pavement. He
          described
          this memory complete with the visual of much flashing color, including the
          horse's harnesses mostly reds, golds and whites. Surely a child's
          perspective.
          Someday it would be interesting to track down the real details of firewagons
          in
          1914. )

          The family story was that as the ship steamed into Baltimore harbor , the
          passengers were all on deck, and my father, dressed in a sailor suit, waving
          an
          American flag and sang, child-like, over and over, in Ukranian, "God bless
          us,
          God bless us, God bless us."

          I never could understand how the family got a sailor suit to put on this
          Galician child, or an American flag for him to flap. They seemed made-up
          details.
          However, I happened to read on a website I visited after learning the
          documented specifics of their arrival, that often family already in the
          North American
          continent would save up money and send "Western clothes" over to Eastern
          Europe ahead of the trip so that their relatives would "fit in" more nearly
          as
          they disembarked from their ships. It stands to reason that an American flag

          might also be sent as almost a "talisman", evidincing the immigrants'
          goodwill
          and intention to embrace their intended new county.

          I have posted in the files and photos some specifics of this particular
          immigrant experience for those who might want to take a look.

          Catherine

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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