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Re: [Galicia_Poland-Ukraine] Surname ZWIONZYK or ZWIORZYK

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  • bluetea54@aol.com
    Could the name Dworznik be another form of this name? Or Wozniak? Not in my ancestry, but I had known quite a few people with those names. Judy [Non-text
    Message 1 of 20 , Sep 3, 2006
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      Could the name Dworznik be another form of this name?
      Or Wozniak?

      Not in my ancestry, but I had known quite a few people with those names.

      Judy


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Michael
      Dear Fred, Many thanks for your insights into this surname! Michael. ... is ... is a ... came ... is not ... Polish ... citizens ... people lived all ...
      Message 2 of 20 , Sep 3, 2006
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        Dear Fred,
        Many thanks for your insights into this surname! Michael.

        --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "wfhoffman"
        <WFHoffman@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > Michael wrote:
        >
        > > Thanks again. I believe the name Zwionzek is correct. I looked at
        > > ellisisland.org. There is a couple who immigrated in 1913: Stefan
        > > Zwionzek, 27, and wife Josefa, 16, from Lipowtzi, Galicia (his father
        is
        > > given as Ignatz Zwionzek), ethnicity was Polish. Lipowtzi (Lipowce)
        is a
        > > village next to Wisniowczyk (in fact, my grandfather's grandfather
        came
        > > from there). The surname must be the same as my great-
        > > grandmother's. She was one of two sisters, so the relationship
        > > probably goes back back further. Best, Michael.
        >
        > I'd say ZWIONZEK is likely to be correct -- which is, in turn, a phonetic
        > rendering of the name Poles usually spell ZWIAZEK. The key is, that A
        is not
        > plain A, but the nasal vowel written as an A with a little hook under it.
        > (Online I use A~ to distinguish it from plain A, because the actual
        Polish
        > character, a, doesn't always display correctly online). That vowel is
        > usually pronounced much like "on" in French _bon_, and when people
        > unfamiliar with Polish heard it, they often spelled it phonetically as ON.
        >
        > As of 1990, according to the database at
        > http://www.herby.com.pl/herby/indexslo.html, there were 575 Polish
        citizens
        > named ZWIA~ZEK (and 1 who spelled it ZWIONZEK). Those 575
        people lived all
        > over the country, with the largest numbers in the following provinces:
        > Warsaw 62, Czestochowa 89, Katowice 137, and Lodz 41. This data
        shows the
        > name appears all over Poland, but most often in the southcentral part
        of the
        > country. The 1 person listed as ZWIONZEK lived in Katowice province,
        which
        > is in Silesia. Name spellings in that area are often modified due to the
        > historically high German and Czech components ot the population.
        >
        > Since Lipowce and Wisniowczyk are both now in Ukraine, the
        database I cited
        > would not include ZWIA~ZEK's living there; it only covers citizens of
        Poland
        > in its current borders. Still, sometimes it can prove useful to know
        where a
        > surname shows up in Poland, even if the family comes from areas no
        longer
        > within that country.
        >
        > Actually "Ignatz Zwionzek" strikes me as a German rendering of Polish
        > "Ignacy Zwia~zek." Many Poles lived in areas ruled by Germany;
        many others,
        > such as those from Galicia, ended up emigrating through the German
        ports of
        > Bremen and Hamburg. So it's not hard to understand why their
        names often got
        > "Germanized" somewhere along the way. I think that may explain why
        the name
        > shows up as ZWIONZEK instead of the standard Polish spelling of
        ZWIA~ZEK,
        > and also why we see "Ignatz" instead of "Ignacy" and "Josefa" instead
        of
        > "Jozefa."
        >
        > Prof. Rymut says the derivation of the name is the obvious one, from
        the
        > noun _zwia~zek_, "relationship, connection, union, alliance."
        >
        > As a rule, if a Polish name is written with the combination -ON-, most
        > likely that's a phonetic rendering of Polish A~. Of the various forms
        you've
        > mentioned, ZWIONZEK/ZWIA~ZEK is the one that seems most likely to
        me. Keep
        > an eye open for both spellings and see if that takes you in the right
        > direction.
        >
        > Fred Hoffman
        >
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