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Surname ZWIONZYK or ZWIORZYK

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  • wfhoffman
    Hi, ... I d say ZWIONZEK is likely to be correct -- which is, in turn, a phonetic rendering of the name Poles usually spell ZWIAZEK. The key is, that A is not
    Message 1 of 20 , Sep 3, 2006
      Hi,

      Michael wrote:

      > Thanks again. I believe the name Zwionzek is correct. I looked at
      > ellisisland.org. There is a couple who immigrated in 1913: Stefan
      > Zwionzek, 27, and wife Josefa, 16, from Lipowtzi, Galicia (his father is
      > given as Ignatz Zwionzek), ethnicity was Polish. Lipowtzi (Lipowce) is a
      > village next to Wisniowczyk (in fact, my grandfather's grandfather came
      > from there). The surname must be the same as my great-
      > grandmother's. She was one of two sisters, so the relationship
      > probably goes back back further. Best, Michael.

      I'd say ZWIONZEK is likely to be correct -- which is, in turn, a phonetic
      rendering of the name Poles usually spell ZWIAZEK. The key is, that A is not
      plain A, but the nasal vowel written as an A with a little hook under it.
      (Online I use A~ to distinguish it from plain A, because the actual Polish
      character, a, doesn't always display correctly online). That vowel is
      usually pronounced much like "on" in French _bon_, and when people
      unfamiliar with Polish heard it, they often spelled it phonetically as ON.

      As of 1990, according to the database at
      http://www.herby.com.pl/herby/indexslo.html, there were 575 Polish citizens
      named ZWIA~ZEK (and 1 who spelled it ZWIONZEK). Those 575 people lived all
      over the country, with the largest numbers in the following provinces:
      Warsaw 62, Czestochowa 89, Katowice 137, and Lodz 41. This data shows the
      name appears all over Poland, but most often in the southcentral part of the
      country. The 1 person listed as ZWIONZEK lived in Katowice province, which
      is in Silesia. Name spellings in that area are often modified due to the
      historically high German and Czech components ot the population.

      Since Lipowce and Wisniowczyk are both now in Ukraine, the database I cited
      would not include ZWIA~ZEK's living there; it only covers citizens of Poland
      in its current borders. Still, sometimes it can prove useful to know where a
      surname shows up in Poland, even if the family comes from areas no longer
      within that country.

      Actually "Ignatz Zwionzek" strikes me as a German rendering of Polish
      "Ignacy Zwia~zek." Many Poles lived in areas ruled by Germany; many others,
      such as those from Galicia, ended up emigrating through the German ports of
      Bremen and Hamburg. So it's not hard to understand why their names often got
      "Germanized" somewhere along the way. I think that may explain why the name
      shows up as ZWIONZEK instead of the standard Polish spelling of ZWIA~ZEK,
      and also why we see "Ignatz" instead of "Ignacy" and "Josefa" instead of
      "Jozefa."

      Prof. Rymut says the derivation of the name is the obvious one, from the
      noun _zwia~zek_, "relationship, connection, union, alliance."

      As a rule, if a Polish name is written with the combination -ON-, most
      likely that's a phonetic rendering of Polish A~. Of the various forms you've
      mentioned, ZWIONZEK/ZWIA~ZEK is the one that seems most likely to me. Keep
      an eye open for both spellings and see if that takes you in the right
      direction.

      Fred Hoffman
    • bluetea54@aol.com
      Could the name Dworznik be another form of this name? Or Wozniak? Not in my ancestry, but I had known quite a few people with those names. Judy [Non-text
      Message 2 of 20 , Sep 3, 2006
        Could the name Dworznik be another form of this name?
        Or Wozniak?

        Not in my ancestry, but I had known quite a few people with those names.

        Judy


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael
        Dear Fred, Many thanks for your insights into this surname! Michael. ... is ... is a ... came ... is not ... Polish ... citizens ... people lived all ...
        Message 3 of 20 , Sep 3, 2006
          Dear Fred,
          Many thanks for your insights into this surname! Michael.

          --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "wfhoffman"
          <WFHoffman@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi,
          >
          > Michael wrote:
          >
          > > Thanks again. I believe the name Zwionzek is correct. I looked at
          > > ellisisland.org. There is a couple who immigrated in 1913: Stefan
          > > Zwionzek, 27, and wife Josefa, 16, from Lipowtzi, Galicia (his father
          is
          > > given as Ignatz Zwionzek), ethnicity was Polish. Lipowtzi (Lipowce)
          is a
          > > village next to Wisniowczyk (in fact, my grandfather's grandfather
          came
          > > from there). The surname must be the same as my great-
          > > grandmother's. She was one of two sisters, so the relationship
          > > probably goes back back further. Best, Michael.
          >
          > I'd say ZWIONZEK is likely to be correct -- which is, in turn, a phonetic
          > rendering of the name Poles usually spell ZWIAZEK. The key is, that A
          is not
          > plain A, but the nasal vowel written as an A with a little hook under it.
          > (Online I use A~ to distinguish it from plain A, because the actual
          Polish
          > character, a, doesn't always display correctly online). That vowel is
          > usually pronounced much like "on" in French _bon_, and when people
          > unfamiliar with Polish heard it, they often spelled it phonetically as ON.
          >
          > As of 1990, according to the database at
          > http://www.herby.com.pl/herby/indexslo.html, there were 575 Polish
          citizens
          > named ZWIA~ZEK (and 1 who spelled it ZWIONZEK). Those 575
          people lived all
          > over the country, with the largest numbers in the following provinces:
          > Warsaw 62, Czestochowa 89, Katowice 137, and Lodz 41. This data
          shows the
          > name appears all over Poland, but most often in the southcentral part
          of the
          > country. The 1 person listed as ZWIONZEK lived in Katowice province,
          which
          > is in Silesia. Name spellings in that area are often modified due to the
          > historically high German and Czech components ot the population.
          >
          > Since Lipowce and Wisniowczyk are both now in Ukraine, the
          database I cited
          > would not include ZWIA~ZEK's living there; it only covers citizens of
          Poland
          > in its current borders. Still, sometimes it can prove useful to know
          where a
          > surname shows up in Poland, even if the family comes from areas no
          longer
          > within that country.
          >
          > Actually "Ignatz Zwionzek" strikes me as a German rendering of Polish
          > "Ignacy Zwia~zek." Many Poles lived in areas ruled by Germany;
          many others,
          > such as those from Galicia, ended up emigrating through the German
          ports of
          > Bremen and Hamburg. So it's not hard to understand why their
          names often got
          > "Germanized" somewhere along the way. I think that may explain why
          the name
          > shows up as ZWIONZEK instead of the standard Polish spelling of
          ZWIA~ZEK,
          > and also why we see "Ignatz" instead of "Ignacy" and "Josefa" instead
          of
          > "Jozefa."
          >
          > Prof. Rymut says the derivation of the name is the obvious one, from
          the
          > noun _zwia~zek_, "relationship, connection, union, alliance."
          >
          > As a rule, if a Polish name is written with the combination -ON-, most
          > likely that's a phonetic rendering of Polish A~. Of the various forms
          you've
          > mentioned, ZWIONZEK/ZWIA~ZEK is the one that seems most likely to
          me. Keep
          > an eye open for both spellings and see if that takes you in the right
          > direction.
          >
          > Fred Hoffman
          >
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