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Re: Surnames Krudzo / Kukurudzo

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  • krupniak
    More BTWs: kukurudz is the cone of a coniferous tree. kukurudza is maize/corn/Indian corn/wheat. I m not sure which word the surname Kukurudza is based on.
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 1, 2006
      More BTWs:

      kukurudz is the cone of a coniferous tree.


      kukurudza is maize/corn/Indian corn/wheat.


      I'm not sure which word the surname Kukurudza is based on. Fred,
      can you help? Was corn present in eastern Europe for a surname to
      be based on corn?


      ________

      Lavrentiy






      --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, Judie Hawryluk
      <jahawryluk@...> wrote:
      >
      > Just a tidbit: "Kukurudza" translates to "corn" in english. We
      know of a Bohdan Kukurudza who lives in Chicago (don't have his
      address..) ... who once introduced himself as Mr. Corn at a
      Ukrainian convention... Judie
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message ----
      > From: Irene <ibaranski@...>
      > To: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, July 31, 2006 9:58:17 AM
      > Subject: [Galicia_Poland-Ukraine] Surnames Krudzo / Kukurudzo
      >
      > Help needed.... I am trying to help my cousin search her husband's
      family. I was told that there was a book on the early settlers in
      Manitoba. I would like to know if it includes the town in Galicia
      where they came from? On the 1906 and 1911 census for Manitoba
      (Dauphin) the name was Kukurudza later changed to Krudzo. If someone
      has access to the book and could do a lookup I would be most
      appreciative. If I have the title I could check my library and see if
      it is on loan.
      >
      > Thank you so much for your help.
      >
      > Irene
    • John T. Zubal
      Larry: We in the USA use the term corn to mean simply that: what we also call sweet corn which grows on tall stalks, two or three ears to a stalk. In many
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 1, 2006
        Larry:

        We in the USA use the term "corn" to mean simply that: what we also
        call sweet corn which grows on tall stalks, two or three ears to a
        stalk. In many parts of the rest of the world, "corn" is used in a
        broader sense to include, for example, wheat, rye, barley, and other
        grassy plants that produce seeds. Put another way, what we call
        "corn" is known in other parts of the world as "MAIZE."

        QED, the Ukrainian name KUKURUDZA probably denotes what we would call
        a grain farmer or grain cultivator, one who grows wheat or rye or
        oats, perhaps long before MAIZE was introduced into East Central Europe.

        It happens that KUKURUDZA was my mother's family's name.

        regards

        John Zubal


        On Aug 1, 2006, at 9:35 AM, krupniak wrote:

        >
        >
        > More BTWs:
        >
        > kukurudz is the cone of a coniferous tree.
        >
        >
        > kukurudza is maize/corn/Indian corn/wheat.
        >
        >
        > I'm not sure which word the surname Kukurudza is based on. Fred,
        > can you help? Was corn present in eastern Europe for a surname to
        > be based on corn?
        >
        >
        > ________
        >
        > Lavrentiy
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, Judie Hawryluk
        > <jahawryluk@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> Just a tidbit: "Kukurudza" translates to "corn" in english. We
        > know of a Bohdan Kukurudza who lives in Chicago (don't have his
        > address..) ... who once introduced himself as Mr. Corn at a
        > Ukrainian convention... Judie
        >>
        >>
        >> ----- Original Message ----
        >> From: Irene <ibaranski@...>
        >> To: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
        >> Sent: Monday, July 31, 2006 9:58:17 AM
        >> Subject: [Galicia_Poland-Ukraine] Surnames Krudzo / Kukurudzo
        >>
        >> Help needed.... I am trying to help my cousin search her husband's
        > family. I was told that there was a book on the early settlers in
        > Manitoba. I would like to know if it includes the town in Galicia
        > where they came from? On the 1906 and 1911 census for Manitoba
        > (Dauphin) the name was Kukurudza later changed to Krudzo. If someone
        > has access to the book and could do a lookup I would be most
        > appreciative. If I have the title I could check my library and see if
        > it is on loan.
        >>
        >> Thank you so much for your help.
        >>
        >> Irene
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Laurence Krupnak
        Hello John, Thanks....your information helps. So, maize is sweet corn, and corn (kukurudza) is any grain (wheat,rye, barley, etc.). This helps with my
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 1, 2006
          Hello John,

          Thanks....your information helps.

          So, maize is sweet corn, and corn (kukurudza) is any grain
          (wheat,rye, barley, etc.).

          This helps with my surname...Krupniak. Krupy is peeled grain,
          groats, grits. So should I assume that my ancestor that had that
          surname Krupniak ascribed was involved in processed grain. Is that
          correct? Grain milling?


          _______

          Lavrentiy






          -------- Original Message --------
          Subject: Re: [Galicia_Poland-Ukraine] Re: Surnames Krudzo / Kukurudzo
          Date: Tue, 1 Aug 2006 10:25:49 -0400
          From: "John T. Zubal" <jzubal@...>
          Reply-To: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
          To: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
          References: <eanlak+8745@...>

          Larry:

          We in the USA use the term "corn" to mean simply that: what we also
          call sweet corn which grows on tall stalks, two or three ears to a
          stalk. In many parts of the rest of the world, "corn" is used in a
          broader sense to include, for example, wheat, rye, barley, and other
          grassy plants that produce seeds. Put another way, what we call
          "corn" is known in other parts of the world as "MAIZE."

          QED, the Ukrainian name KUKURUDZA probably denotes what we would call
          a grain farmer or grain cultivator, one who grows wheat or rye or
          oats, perhaps long before MAIZE was introduced into East Central Europe.

          It happens that KUKURUDZA was my mother's family's name.

          regards

          John Zubal

          On Aug 1, 2006, at 9:35 AM, krupniak wrote:

          >
          >
          > More BTWs:
          >
          > kukurudz is the cone of a coniferous tree.
          >
          >
          > kukurudza is maize/corn/Indian corn/wheat.
          >
          >
          > I'm not sure which word the surname Kukurudza is based on. Fred,
          > can you help? Was corn present in eastern Europe for a surname to
          > be based on corn?
          >
          >
          > ________
          >
          > Lavrentiy
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, Judie Hawryluk
          > <jahawryluk@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> Just a tidbit: "Kukurudza" translates to "corn" in english. We
          > know of a Bohdan Kukurudza who lives in Chicago (don't have his
          > address..) ... who once introduced himself as Mr. Corn at a
          > Ukrainian convention... Judie
          >>
          >>
          >> ----- Original Message ----
          >> From: Irene <ibaranski@...>
          >> To: Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com
          >> Sent: Monday, July 31, 2006 9:58:17 AM
          >> Subject: [Galicia_Poland-Ukraine] Surnames Krudzo / Kukurudzo
          >>
          >> Help needed.... I am trying to help my cousin search her husband's
          > family. I was told that there was a book on the early settlers in
          > Manitoba. I would like to know if it includes the town in Galicia
          > where they came from? On the 1906 and 1911 census for Manitoba
          > (Dauphin) the name was Kukurudza later changed to Krudzo. If someone
          > has access to the book and could do a lookup I would be most
          > appreciative. If I have the title I could check my library and see if
          > it is on loan.
          >>
          >> Thank you so much for your help.
          >>
          >> Irene
        • wfhoffman
          Hi, ... Prof. Rymut s book on Polish surnames says the surname KUKURYDZA comes from the noun _kukurydza_, also seen as _kukurudza_ and _kukuruza_, a cereal
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 1, 2006
            Hi,

            Lavrentiy wrote:

            > kukurudz is the cone of a coniferous tree.
            >
            > kukurudza is maize/corn/Indian corn/wheat.
            >
            > I'm not sure which word the surname Kukurudza is based on. Fred,
            > can you help? Was corn present in eastern Europe for a surname to
            > be based on corn?

            Prof. Rymut's book on Polish surnames says the surname KUKURYDZA comes from
            the noun _kukurydza_, also seen as _kukurudza_ and _kukuruza_, "a cereal
            plant of the grass family." As for the identity of this plant, Aleksander
            Brueckner's _Slownik etymologivzny jezyka polskiego_ [Etymological
            dictionary of the Polish language] says _kukurudza_ is "an American plant,
            cultivated early on in the East, especially in the countries on the Danube;
            the name (which is repeated in Hungarian, Romanian, Turkish) may come from
            the dialect of the Southern Slavs and can perhaps be compared with similar
            words of ours, such as _kokorycz_ [coridalis], _kokornak_ [birthwort], for
            hairy plants."

            By the way I'm sure "hairy plants" isn't quite the right translation for
            _rosliny uwlosione_, but I don't know what the technical term is for the
            fine, hairlike fibers of corn. We call them "silk," but translating _rosliny
            uwlosione_ as "silky plants" doesn't seem like an improvement! In any case,
            the reference is to plants that feature fine hairlike fibers, such as corn
            silk.

            I'm no expert on plants; early on I learned I was allergic to most of them,
            so I avoid contact with them, except in salads. But apparently maize or
            corn -- what Americans call corn, not the British usage, which includes
            various cereal grains such as wheat and oats -- was brought to Europe from
            the Americas fairly early on, and was grown in eastern and southeastern
            Europe. I know it can be dicey relying on Wikipedia entries, but
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize says corn came to Europe in the late 15th
            and early 16th centuries. Surnames were being established in Poland all the
            way up to the 18th and even 19th centuries, so it's certainly plausible the
            name KUKURYDZA could have referred to "the corn guy." Maybe he grew it,
            maybe he sold it, maybe he loved to eat it -- but it seems clear the
            reference is to what Americans call corn.

            That's the best info I could find, anyway.

            Fred Hoffman
            Author, _Polish Surnames: Origins & Meanings_
          • krupniak
            Hello Fred, and John Z., Great English-Polish dictionary has that maize is kukurydza and that corn has several entries: zboz~e, (w Anglii) pszenica, (w Ameryce
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 1, 2006
              Hello Fred, and John Z.,

              Great English-Polish dictionary has that maize is kukurydza and
              that corn has several entries: zboz~e, (w Anglii) pszenica, (w
              Ameryce Pln) kukurydza, (w Szkocji i Irlandi) owies.

              Sweet-corn is sl~odka kukurydza.

              I need to take a break.....it's 105 degrees now in the DC area.
              My brain is melting.


              _____

              Lavrentiy




              --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, "wfhoffman"
              <WFHoffman@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi,
              >
              > Lavrentiy wrote:
              >
              > > kukurudz is the cone of a coniferous tree.
              > >
              > > kukurudza is maize/corn/Indian corn/wheat.
              > >
              > > I'm not sure which word the surname Kukurudza is based on. Fred,
              > > can you help? Was corn present in eastern Europe for a surname to
              > > be based on corn?
              >
              > Prof. Rymut's book on Polish surnames says the surname KUKURYDZA
              comes from
              > the noun _kukurydza_, also seen as _kukurudza_ and _kukuruza_, "a
              cereal
              > plant of the grass family." As for the identity of this plant,
              Aleksander
              > Brueckner's _Slownik etymologivzny jezyka polskiego_ [Etymological
              > dictionary of the Polish language] says _kukurudza_ is "an American
              plant,
              > cultivated early on in the East, especially in the countries on the
              Danube;
              > the name (which is repeated in Hungarian, Romanian, Turkish) may
              come from
              > the dialect of the Southern Slavs and can perhaps be compared with
              similar
              > words of ours, such as _kokorycz_ [coridalis], _kokornak_
              [birthwort], for
              > hairy plants."
              >
              > By the way I'm sure "hairy plants" isn't quite the right
              translation for
              > _rosliny uwlosione_, but I don't know what the technical term is
              for the
              > fine, hairlike fibers of corn. We call them "silk," but translating
              _rosliny
              > uwlosione_ as "silky plants" doesn't seem like an improvement! In
              any case,
              > the reference is to plants that feature fine hairlike fibers, such
              as corn
              > silk.
              >
              > I'm no expert on plants; early on I learned I was allergic to most
              of them,
              > so I avoid contact with them, except in salads. But apparently
              maize or
              > corn -- what Americans call corn, not the British usage, which
              includes
              > various cereal grains such as wheat and oats -- was brought to
              Europe from
              > the Americas fairly early on, and was grown in eastern and
              southeastern
              > Europe. I know it can be dicey relying on Wikipedia entries, but
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize says corn came to Europe in the
              late 15th
              > and early 16th centuries. Surnames were being established in Poland
              all the
              > way up to the 18th and even 19th centuries, so it's certainly
              plausible the
              > name KUKURYDZA could have referred to "the corn guy." Maybe he grew
              it,
              > maybe he sold it, maybe he loved to eat it -- but it seems clear
              the
              > reference is to what Americans call corn.
              >
              > That's the best info I could find, anyway.
              >
              > Fred Hoffman
              > Author, _Polish Surnames: Origins & Meanings_
              >
            • krupniak
              ... know of a Bohdan Kukurudza who lives in Chicago (don t have his address..) ... who once introduced himself as Mr. Corn at a Ukrainian convention...
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 1, 2006
                --- In Galicia_Poland-Ukraine@yahoogroups.com, Judie Hawryluk
                <jahawryluk@...> wrote:
                >
                > Just a tidbit: "Kukurudza" translates to "corn" in english. We
                know of a Bohdan Kukurudza who lives in Chicago (don't have his
                address..) ... who once introduced himself as Mr. Corn at a
                Ukrainian convention... Judie


                **********
                Hello Judie,

                I wonder if Bohdan implies that he is Mr. Sweet-corn or Mr. Grain?


                _______

                Lavrentiy


                .
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