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Re: [GPSL] 3,000 F Caps

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  • Dan Bowen
    Did you get any meteor bits? Thanks, Dan Sent from my iPhone 4
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 2, 2010
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      Did you get any meteor bits?

      Thanks,
      Dan


      Sent from my iPhone 4

      On Oct 2, 2010, at 5:21, wb8elk@... wrote:

       

      We flew Aerogel to capture meteor particles during the Leonids meteor storm 10 years ago....great stuff...like a cloud and as light.
       
      - Bill WB8ELK



      -----Original Message-----
      From: L. Paul Verhage <nearsys@...>
      To: GPSL@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2010 10:35 pm
      Subject: Re: [GPSL] 3,000 F Caps

       
      Man, there's so much to learn.
       
      Thanks, I know I can count on this group to educate.
       
      Yep, I get a 0.6 volt drop per hour. 
       
      I've heard some super caps use aerogel (for their insulation between layers?).  I had an opportunity to see aerogel at the National Air and Space Musum.  The stuff looks blue cigarette smoke, but frozen in place.
       
      Paul   

      On Fri, Oct 1, 2010 at 8:41 PM, Mike Manes <mrmanes@...> wrote:
      At a 500 mA load, a 3000 F cap will discharge 0.6V per hour, if I didn't
      screw up the math.  At a constant current, the cap voltage will decay
      linearly all the way to zip.  Rate of change of cap voltage:
      dV/dt (V/s) = I(A)/C(F).
      73 de Mike W5VSI

      On 10/1/2010 13:44, wb8elk@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > Paul....you also have to look at the voltage discharge curve on
      > these.......depending on your usable cutoff voltage, you won't get the whole
      > capacity on Supercaps....perhaps 30 to 50 percent of the capacity depending on
      > your voltage overhead to start and your minimum usable voltage.
      > - Bill WB8ELK
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: L. Paul Verhage <nearsys@...>
      > To: gpsl@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2010 12:30 pm
      > Subject: [GPSL] 3,000 F Caps
      >
      > Does anyone need a 3,000 F, 2.7 volt, 3 KW capacitor? Man, you could run your
      > near spacecraft off of one of these charged caps.
      > Here's the link.
      > http://www.goldmine-elec.com/mailchimp/20100930/?utm_source=Electronic+Goldmine+Newsletter&utm_campaign=bb9a1752fe-September30&utm_medium=email
      > <http://www.goldmine-elec.com/mailchimp/20100930/?utm_source=Electronic+Goldmine+Newsletter&utm_campaign=bb9a1752fe-September30&utm_medium=email>
      > The caps are used electric cars.
      > The are 3 WH. At 2.7 volts, that's just over an amp of current for an hour.
      > I'm thinking my near space craft needs less than 0.5 amps of current. I would
      > need two of these in parallel for 5.4 volts which is barely enough for the LDO
      > voltage regulator I use. However, at 0.9 pounds each, I'm still better off
      > with batteries.
      >
      > --
      > Onwards and Upwards,
      > Paul
      >
      >
      >

      --
      Mike Manes    mrmanes@...     Tel: 303-979-4899
      "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not more so."
      A. Einstein


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      --
      Onwards and Upwards,
      Paul

    • wb8elk@aol.com
      Dan....yes, there is one impact crater in the Aerogel that came from a Leonid (perhaps more) while the balloon was in the stratosphere. I can t find the web
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 2, 2010
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        Dan....yes, there is one impact crater in the Aerogel that came from a Leonid (perhaps more) while the balloon was in the stratosphere.
         
        I can't find the web page that described the results of the analysis on the Aerogel...but here's a link about the balloon flight itself...I helped with several of these from 1998 to 2001.
         
         
        - Bill WB8ELK


         


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Dan Bowen <dbowen1@...>
        To: GPSL@yahoogroups.com <GPSL@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sat, Oct 2, 2010 7:55 pm
        Subject: Re: [GPSL] 3,000 F Caps

         
        Did you get any meteor bits?

        Thanks,
        Dan


        Sent from my iPhone 4

        On Oct 2, 2010, at 5:21, wb8elk@... wrote:

         
        We flew Aerogel to capture meteor particles during the Leonids meteor storm 10 years ago....great stuff...like a cloud and as light.
         
        - Bill WB8ELK



        -----Original Message-----
        From: L. Paul Verhage <nearsys@...>
        To: GPSL@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2010 10:35 pm
        Subject: Re: [GPSL] 3,000 F Caps

         
        Man, there's so much to learn.
         
        Thanks, I know I can count on this group to educate.
         
        Yep, I get a 0.6 volt drop per hour. 
         
        I've heard some super caps use aerogel (for their insulation between layers?).  I had an opportunity to see aerogel at the National Air and Space Musum.  The stuff looks blue cigarette smoke, but frozen in place.
         
        Paul   

        On Fri, Oct 1, 2010 at 8:41 PM, Mike Manes <mrmanes@...> wrote:
        At a 500 mA load, a 3000 F cap will discharge 0.6V per hour, if I didn't
        screw up the math.  At a constant current, the cap voltage will decay
        linearly all the way to zip.  Rate of change of cap voltage:
        dV/dt (V/s) = I(A)/C(F).
        73 de Mike W5VSI

        On 10/1/2010 13:44, wb8elk@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > Paul....you also have to look at the voltage discharge curve on
        > these.......depending on your usable cutoff voltage, you won't get the whole
        > capacity on Supercaps....perhaps 30 to 50 percent of the capacity depending on
        > your voltage overhead to start and your minimum usable voltage.
        > - Bill WB8ELK
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: L. Paul Verhage <nearsys@...>
        > To: gpsl@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2010 12:30 pm
        > Subject: [GPSL] 3,000 F Caps
        >
        > Does anyone need a 3,000 F, 2.7 volt, 3 KW capacitor? Man, you could run your
        > near spacecraft off of one of these charged caps.
        > Here's the link.
        > http://www.goldmine-elec.com/mailchimp/20100930/?utm_source=Electronic+Goldmine+Newsletter&utm_campaign=bb9a1752fe-September30&utm_medium=email
        > <http://www.goldmine-elec.com/mailchimp/20100930/?utm_source=Electronic+Goldmine+Newsletter&utm_campaign=bb9a1752fe-September30&utm_medium=email>
        > The caps are used electric cars.
        > The are 3 WH. At 2.7 volts, that's just over an amp of current for an hour.
        > I'm thinking my near space craft needs less than 0.5 amps of current. I would
        > need two of these in parallel for 5.4 volts which is barely enough for the LDO
        > voltage regulator I use. However, at 0.9 pounds each, I'm still better off
        > with batteries.
        >
        > --
        > Onwards and Upwards,
        > Paul
        >
        >
        >

        --
        Mike Manes    mrmanes@...     Tel: 303-979-4899
        "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not more so."
        A. Einstein


        ------------------------------------

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        --
        Onwards and Upwards,
        Paul
      • L. Paul Verhage
        You know, my understanding is that some of the dust that washes off your roof and down the rain gutter is meteoritic dust. The problem is that you can t tell
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 3, 2010
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          You know, my understanding is that some of the dust that washes off your roof and down the rain gutter is meteoritic dust.  The problem is that you can't tell which is extraterrestrial and which is terrestrial without a serious microscope.
           
          At least if you capture it in the stratosphere, it's extraterrestrial unless there has been a serious volcanic eruption or meteor impact.
           
          Paul "Hey, don't brush that dust off my furniture, it's from space!" Verhage

          On Sat, Oct 2, 2010 at 7:55 PM, Dan Bowen <dbowen1@...> wrote:


          Did you get any meteor bits?

          Thanks,
          Dan


          Sent from my iPhone 4

          On Oct 2, 2010, at 5:21, wb8elk@... wrote:

           

          We flew Aerogel to capture meteor particles during the Leonids meteor storm 10 years ago....great stuff...like a cloud and as light.
           
          - Bill WB8ELK



          -----Original Message-----
          From: L. Paul Verhage <nearsys@...>
          To: GPSL@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2010 10:35 pm
          Subject: Re: [GPSL] 3,000 F Caps

           
          Man, there's so much to learn.
           
          Thanks, I know I can count on this group to educate.
           
          Yep, I get a 0.6 volt drop per hour. 
           
          I've heard some super caps use aerogel (for their insulation between layers?).  I had an opportunity to see aerogel at the National Air and Space Musum.  The stuff looks blue cigarette smoke, but frozen in place.
           
          Paul   

          On Fri, Oct 1, 2010 at 8:41 PM, Mike Manes <mrmanes@...> wrote:
          At a 500 mA load, a 3000 F cap will discharge 0.6V per hour, if I didn't
          screw up the math.  At a constant current, the cap voltage will decay
          linearly all the way to zip.  Rate of change of cap voltage:
          dV/dt (V/s) = I(A)/C(F).
          73 de Mike W5VSI

          On 10/1/2010 13:44, wb8elk@... wrote:
          >
          >
          > Paul....you also have to look at the voltage discharge curve on
          > these.......depending on your usable cutoff voltage, you won't get the whole
          > capacity on Supercaps....perhaps 30 to 50 percent of the capacity depending on
          > your voltage overhead to start and your minimum usable voltage.
          > - Bill WB8ELK
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: L. Paul Verhage <nearsys@...>
          > To: gpsl@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2010 12:30 pm
          > Subject: [GPSL] 3,000 F Caps
          >
          > Does anyone need a 3,000 F, 2.7 volt, 3 KW capacitor? Man, you could run your
          > near spacecraft off of one of these charged caps.
          > Here's the link.
          > http://www.goldmine-elec.com/mailchimp/20100930/?utm_source=Electronic+Goldmine+Newsletter&utm_campaign=bb9a1752fe-September30&utm_medium=email
          > <http://www.goldmine-elec.com/mailchimp/20100930/?utm_source=Electronic+Goldmine+Newsletter&utm_campaign=bb9a1752fe-September30&utm_medium=email>
          > The caps are used electric cars.
          > The are 3 WH. At 2.7 volts, that's just over an amp of current for an hour.
          > I'm thinking my near space craft needs less than 0.5 amps of current. I would
          > need two of these in parallel for 5.4 volts which is barely enough for the LDO
          > voltage regulator I use. However, at 0.9 pounds each, I'm still better off
          > with batteries.
          >
          > --
          > Onwards and Upwards,
          > Paul
          >
          >
          >

          --
          Mike Manes    mrmanes@...     Tel: 303-979-4899
          "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not more so."
          A. Einstein


          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

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          --
          Onwards and Upwards,
          Paul






          --
          Onwards and Upwards,
          Paul
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