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Re: [Balloonatics] Re: [GPSL] NSS-50 Flight Summary Video.

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  • Mike Manes
    Yeah, wind shear gradients can be pretty steep. Remember seeing that video of one of the flights where the camera took a shot of itself falling into the
    Message 1 of 13 , May 31, 2010
      Yeah, wind shear gradients can be pretty steep. Remember seeing that
      video of one of the flights where the camera took a shot of itself
      falling into the still-inflated balloon? Now THAT was severe shear!
      73 de Mike W5VSI

      On 5/31/2010 20:10, Joe wrote:
      >
      >> On 5/31/2010 8:51 PM, Mike Manes wrote:
      >>> Hi Joe,
      >>>
      >>> Re the long flight string: I think at best it slows down the period
      >>> of the sway, just like a long pendulum on a clock does.
      > yup and thats one of the reasons we usually do ther long like is to make
      > the slow swing if it does at all.
      >>> But it could
      >>> also create more sway than a short line going thru layers of wind shear,
      >>> since the balloon and payload will be seeing larger differences in wind
      >>> speed.
      > Really think in 100 feet there would be that much difference?
      >
      > That would be a cool experiment if like have wind vanes and anemometers
      > say every 25 feet for 200 feet span and see how much fifference in air
      > movements athere actually is.
      >>> Those inertial arms do a FB job of slowing down the spin,
      >>> however,
      >>> especially on a payload that's aerodynamically symmetrical in the
      >>> horizontal
      >>> plane (no weathervane effects).
      > Yea we tried in the very beginning a weathervane system and it was worse
      > than nothing at all. it grabbed the gusts of wind and jerked it around
      > all the time, and when it wasn't gusty if he vane wasn't exactly
      > vertical it acted like a wing and itself spun the payload around because
      > of the 10 MPh wind flowing across it vertically!
      >>
      >

      --
      Mike Manes mrmanes@... Tel: 303-979-4899
      "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not more so."
      A. Einstein
    • Keith Kaiser
      Joe On the announcements page (http://www.arhab.org/ARHABlaunchannouncements.html) I show your last flight as NS-48 did I get that wrong? Should that have been
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 1, 2010
        Joe

        On the announcements page (http://www.arhab.org/ARHABlaunchannouncements.html) I show your last flight as NS-48 did I get that wrong? Should that have been NS-50? All of the flight records are kept for posterity and I want to correct if it's wrong.

        Congrats on a successful flight!


        On May 31, 2010, at 4:42 PM, Joe wrote:

         

        Afternoon All,

        Well, NSS-50 is in the Bag.

        It was pretty interesting, we still again learned some new stuff. Even
        after 50 flights still keep learning new stuff.

        One thing we learned this flight is the upper winds are weird! Sometimes!

        We flew our usual stable flight train for a Video flight. long flight
        train and stabilization arms.

        All performed as usual. at low altitudes. but once it got like above
        80K it was really strange. The payload was like making a large cone
        circle. sometimes as large as like 45 degrees! Then other times is was
        a side to side swing also to these extremes.

        While this was interesting, what i found interesting was the amount of
        time it would stay at the extremes! like if the whole flight train is
        tilted to a 45 deg angle, and how long it stayed that way weird.

        enjoy!

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHAr7F1w-aE

        Joe WB9SBD
        Near Space Sciences KB9KHO


      • Joe
        No you were right, We just didn t announce the last two flights. NSS-49 was testing another GPS. So no big Deal, and NSS-50, yeah we should have done
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 1, 2010
          No you were right,  We just didn't announce the last two flights.

          NSS-49  was testing another GPS.  So no big Deal,  and NSS-50,  yeah we should have done something press wise.  Just never got around to it,  sorry<

          Joe WB9SBD
          Sig
          The Original Rolling Ball Clock
          Idle Tyme
          Idle-Tyme.com
          http://www.idle-tyme.com

          On 6/1/2010 8:08 AM, Keith Kaiser wrote:
          Joe

          On the announcements page (http://www.arhab.org/ARHABlaunchannouncements.html) I show your last flight as NS-48 did I get that wrong? Should that have been NS-50? All of the flight records are kept for posterity and I want to correct if it's wrong.

          Congrats on a successful flight!


          On May 31, 2010, at 4:42 PM, Joe wrote:

           

          Afternoon All,

          Well, NSS-50 is in the Bag.

          It was pretty interesting, we still again learned some new stuff. Even
          after 50 flights still keep learning new stuff.

          One thing we learned this flight is the upper winds are weird! Sometimes!

          We flew our usual stable flight train for a Video flight. long flight
          train and stabilization arms.

          All performed as usual. at low altitudes. but once it got like above
          80K it was really strange. The payload was like making a large cone
          circle. sometimes as large as like 45 degrees! Then other times is was
          a side to side swing also to these extremes.

          While this was interesting, what i found interesting was the amount of
          time it would stay at the extremes! like if the whole flight train is
          tilted to a 45 deg angle, and how long it stayed that way weird.

          enjoy!

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHAr7F1w-aE

          Joe WB9SBD
          Near Space Sciences KB9KHO


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