Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

manned ballooning history and heritage, skin thickness

Expand Messages
  • Mark Caviezel
    I was referring to the US Army s rather common use of H2 balloons during WWI, not the sporadic experiments prior to then. ... My analysis was based on simple
    Message 1 of 1 , May 31, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      I was referring to the US Army's rather common use of H2 balloons during
      WWI, not the sporadic experiments prior to then.

      >>>> Let's not forget that an organized, annual international competition for sport ballooning started in 1906 (and it was not the first). In his book, 'My Airships', aviation pioneer Alberto Santos Dumont describes a rather mature ballooning industry in Paris in the 1890's, with multiple pilots offering rides and flight lessons to those able to pay for them. Many aeronauts of the 1700's and 1800's made hundreds of flights. A number of pilots made a real career of flying balloons between 1783 and the beginning of WW1. Given these documented, historical facts, I'm not sure that it is accurate to describe this very significant amount of aeronautical knowledge as merely 'sporadic experiments.'





      My analysis was based on simple geometry, comparing the surface area of
      single vs. multiple spheres having the same total volume, assuming equal
      skin densities and configurations.
      >>>>> Ah, understood. But in exactly the same way that
      the skin thickness on a B757 is far greater than a Cessna 152, you'll find that a conventional gas balloon has a far greater areal density than a 630 gram chloroprene cluster balloon cell.


      best

      - Mark
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.