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Re: Stronger balloons?

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  • Mike Manes
    Hi Mike, Well, hydrogen will burn in the upper atmosphere, provided with a near-adiabatic supply of oxygen. After all, that s what the NASA Shuttle main
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 1, 2005
      Hi Mike,

      Well, hydrogen will burn in the upper atmosphere, provided with a
      near-adiabatic supply of oxygen. After all, that's what the NASA
      Shuttle main engines run on.

      However, if you were to use the hydrogen for propulsion, then you'd
      have a rocket. And if you think FAR 101 is tough for balloons, check
      the same regs for rockets!

      ANd you're right about hydrogen being a bit dangerous. It does yield
      maybe 10% more lift than helium and it costs a lot less. But all the
      ignition-avoidance and fire protection you'd be compelled to deal
      with isn't likely worth those benefits.

      73 de Mike W5VSI
      EOSS

      upand_at_them wrote:
      >
      > Okay, thanks for the explanation guys. I was just trying to think of a
      > way to achieve even higher altitude.
      >
      > My other idea was a balloon filled with hydrogen where the hydrogen is
      > ignited and used for propulsion once the balloon reached near max
      > altitude. But then, hydrogen is dangerous, and it probably won't burn
      > in the upper atmosphere.
      >
      > Mike

      --
      Mike Manes manes@... Tel: 303-979-4899
      "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not more so." A.
      Einstein
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