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Re: [GPSL] Balloon burst video on spaceweather.com

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  • Mark Conner
    I see now that the page has been changed to reflect that talcum powder is the source of the halo. 73 de Mark N9XTN ... I see now that the page has been changed
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 10, 2011
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      I see now that the page has been changed to reflect that talcum powder is the source of the halo.

      73 de Mark N9XTN

      On Mon, Oct 10, 2011 at 14:07, Bruce Coates <bruce.coates@...> wrote:
      Ya, I think the talc group is on the right track but it's still fun to think
      about this stuff.

      73, Bruce
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Mike Manes" <mrmanes@...>
      To: "Bruce Coates" <bruce.coates@...>
      Cc: <GPSL@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, October 10, 2011 1:01 PM
      Subject: Re: [GPSL] Balloon burst video on spaceweather.com


      > Hi Bruce,
      >
      > Latex balloons are pretty near evacuated of all gas as shipped, so if
      > you got enough H2O in your fill to see vapor on burst , then I would
      > suggest
      > a strongly worded letter to your He supplier.
      >
      > Now, the burst event DOES yield a very fast, perhaps trans-sonic, wave
      > front, which could produce condensation of ambient air vapor, as we've
      > seen in pix busting Mach 1. But those were at low altitude, and probably
      > in high RH - unlike the very low RH in the stratosphere.
      >
      > - 73 de Mike
      >
      > On 10/10/2011 11:12, Bruce Coates wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> Hi Mark
      >> Great video.
      >> I think you’re probably closer to the truth than their explanation.
      >> “... Helium condensing into vapour......”. Um, unless the stratosphere
      >> where
      >> they are is −452.07 °F (+4.22 Kelvin, −268.93 °C) it’s going to be pretty
      >> tough to condense Helium. Many of us have measured the ambient
      >> temperature at
      >> 100,000 feet to be –20 to –50 C not –269. If you could condense Helium
      >> at –40
      >> Saskatchewan in January would be the place to go for liquid Helium. ;-)
      >> My wild guess has always been the residual humidity trapped in the
      >> balloon.
      >> Oops. That doesn’t sound certain enough. I’m not even sure how or if
      >> Helium
      >> can support water vapour like good old air can. Despite this, with a
      >> straight
      >> face I’ll state emphatically “It definitely is trapped water vapour”.
      >> (You
      >> never get quoted unless you make your wild speculations sound like
      >> absolute
      >> facts). ;-)
      >> Still a great video though.
      >> 73, Bruce – VE5BNC
      >> *From:* Mark Conner <mailto:mconner1@...>
      >> *Sent:* Monday, October 10, 2011 10:27 AM
      >> *To:* GPSL list <mailto:GPSL@yahoogroups.com>
      >> *Subject:* [GPSL] Balloon burst video on spaceweather.com
      >>
      >> http://spaceweather.com/
      >>
      >> Very nice, high-quality video of a balloon burst. You can see the balloon
      >> neck
      >> and attached shards being snapped downwards after burst, pulling the
      >> stack
      >> inverted for a time.
      >>
      >> However, there is one very interesting quote on the site - this is the
      >> first
      >> I've seen this explanation:
      >>
      >>     "Note the ghostly halo around the center of the exploding balloon.
      >> That's
      >>     relatively warm helium condensing into vapor droplets as it is
      >> exposed to
      >>     the super-cold air of the stratosphere--akin to moisture condensing
      >> on the
      >>     outside of a cold Coke bottle."
      >>
      >> JackieChan.png
      >> That's way more sciency than the mundane talcum power theory I've been
      >> using
      >> for more than a decade now.
      >> 73 de Mark N9XTN
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      > --
      > Mike Manes    mrmanes@...     Tel: 303-979-4899
      > "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not more so."
      > A. Einstein
      >
      >



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    • Bruce Coates
      And here s a clip of a balloon blowing up in someone s back yard. Yup, it s talc alright. Shame, it looked like a perfectly good balloon too. ;-) 73, Bruce
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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        And here's a clip of a balloon blowing up in someone's back yard. Yup, it's
        talc alright.

        Shame, it looked like a perfectly good balloon too. ;-)

        73, Bruce


        >> *From:* Mark Conner <mailto:mconner1@...>
        >> *Sent:* Monday, October 10, 2011 10:27 AM
        >> *To:* GPSL list <mailto:GPSL@yahoogroups.com>
        >> *Subject:* [GPSL] Balloon burst video on spaceweather.com
        >>
        >> http://spaceweather.com/
        >>
        >> Very nice, high-quality video of a balloon burst. You can see the balloon
        >> neck
        >> and attached shards being snapped downwards after burst, pulling the
        >> stack
        >> inverted for a time.
        >>
        >> However, there is one very interesting quote on the site - this is the
        >> first
        >> I've seen this explanation:
        >>
        >> "Note the ghostly halo around the center of the exploding balloon.
        >> That's
        >> relatively warm helium condensing into vapor droplets as it is
        >> exposed to
        >> the super-cold air of the stratosphere--akin to moisture condensing
        >> on the
        >> outside of a cold Coke bottle."
        >>
      • Bruce Coates
        That note would have made much more sense if I have included the link. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4Ce2EM7ku8&NR=1&feature=fvwp Bruce ... From: Bruce
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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          That note would have made much more sense if I have included the link. 
           
           
          Bruce
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 5:40 PM
          Subject: Re: [GPSL] Balloon burst video on spaceweather.com

           

          And here's a clip of a balloon blowing up in someone's back yard. Yup, it's
          talc alright.

          Shame, it looked like a perfectly good balloon too. ;-)

          73, Bruce

          >> *From:* Mark Conner <mailto:mconner1@...>
          >> *Sent:* Monday, October 10, 2011 10:27 AM
          >> *To:* GPSL list <mailto:GPSL@yahoogroups.com>
          >> *Subject:* [GPSL] Balloon burst video on spaceweather.com
          >>
          >> http://spaceweather.com/
          >>
          >> Very nice, high-quality video of a balloon burst. You can see the balloon
          >> neck
          >> and attached shards being snapped downwards after burst, pulling the
          >> stack
          >> inverted for a time.
          >>
          >> However, there is one very interesting quote on the site - this is the
          >> first
          >> I've seen this explanation:
          >>
          >> "Note the ghostly halo around the center of the exploding balloon.
          >> That's
          >> relatively warm helium condensing into vapor droplets as it is
          >> exposed to
          >> the super-cold air of the stratosphere--akin to moisture condensing
          >> on the
          >> outside of a cold Coke bottle."
          >>

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