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7891Re: [GPSL] 5 Years from Now

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  • Mike Manes
    Aug 1, 2010
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      Dr Peiter Tans of NOAA developed the Aircore and has both analysis and
      empirical data to show the vertical resolution. I can send you his email
      address if you want more than I passed on off the top of my head.
      73 de Mike W5VSI

      On 8/1/2010 16:08, Mark Conner wrote:
      > Very interesting, thanks Mike. I can buy a concentration precision (maybe
      > even accuracy) of 1 ppm with their method, but I think 10m vertical precision
      > is asking a lot from the sampling method. They can generate that precision,
      > but I'd have my doubts on the accuracy.
      >
      > Anyway, now I can Google for more ("NOAA aircore profiler") and I see a few
      > hits worth investigating already. Seems a simple enough process and may be
      > worth showing to some atmospheric science types at Creighton or NU.
      >
      > 73 de Mark N9XTN
      >
      >
      > On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 16:58, Mike Manes <mrmanes@...
      > <mailto:mrmanes@...>> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Mark,
      >
      > The NOAA profiler, aka "Aircore", has two parts:
      >
      > 1. The airborne portion is 100 m length of about 1/4" OD tubing, coiled up and
      > sealed at one end with a valve at the other. The tube is filled with a
      > standard 380 ppm concentration of CO2 and air. Just before launch, the valve
      > is opened, so that the tube vents during ascent. Now, during descent, the
      > tube refills with ambient air, forming the gaseous equivalent of a core
      > sample. On landing the valve is closed, thus sealing off the core sample.
      > Due to the internal dimensions of the tube, the CO2 concentration of the
      > core sample retains its structure, since diffusion is relatively slow in that
      > long, skinny enclosure.
      >
      > 2. After the flight, the tube is connected to a very sensitive IR
      > spectrometer, and the core sample is then pushed out from the end opposite
      > from the flight valve using 380 ppm air. The spectrometer is tuned to
      > absorption line(s) of the gas species of interest. The 380 ppm "push" gas
      > serves as an "eof" marker.
      >
      > If the aircore sample get to the lab within 24 hours, the CO2 concentration
      > can be resolved with a resolution of 10 m in altitude with a precision of
      > better than 1 ppm. As one can understand, high confidence in a timely
      > recovery after landing is a key requirement.
      >
      > Now, I've heard that there are some folks working on real-time in situ CO2
      > analyzers, and EOSS might be flying some of those by 'n by.
      >
      > 73 de Mike W5VSI
      >
      > On 7/31/2010 21:16, Mark Conner wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Mike,
      >
      > Any details on the CO2 sensors? The company I work for has some
      > interest in
      > balloon-borne CO2 sensor profiles.
      >
      > Still hoping someday to combine hobby and work.........
      >
      > 73 de Mark N9XTN
      >
      >
      > On Sat, Jul 31, 2010 at 21:58, Mike Manes <mrmanes@...
      > <mailto:mrmanes@...>
      > <mailto:mrmanes@... <mailto:mrmanes@...>>> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > EOSS has flown several in situ atmospheric CO2 and CH4 profilers
      > for NOAA, and
      > some of the results have been quite revealing.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Mike Manes mrmanes@... <mailto:mrmanes@...> Tel: 303-979-4899
      > "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not more so."
      > A. Einstein
      >
      >

      --
      Mike Manes mrmanes@... Tel: 303-979-4899
      "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not more so."
      A. Einstein
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