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Re: [GMRS] Comminucations in the Jungle

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  • kvsp1160@aol.com
    David, I don t think GMRS is legal in C. America. You could try ham, but check with the FCC or others here on that one. Ya know, shortwave is another good idea
    Message 1 of 17 , May 1, 2003
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      David,

      I don't think GMRS is legal in C. America. You could try ham, but check with
      the FCC or others here on that one. Ya know, shortwave is another good idea
      to try, but it tends to go farther than you need and I'm sure how to go about
      getting a license and radio for that...

      Any thoughts guys??

      Ryan
      WPUI299
      San Jose, CA
    • wpuc720@juno.com
      That blanket statement is patently untrue. 11-meter CB radio is authorized in quite a few countries around the world, many with the same modes and
      Message 2 of 17 , May 1, 2003
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        That blanket statement is patently untrue. 11-meter CB radio is
        authorized in quite a few countries around the world, many with the same
        modes and channelization as the US. FRS as we know it is authorized in
        several countries in ITU Region 2 (the Western Hemisphere). I am unaware
        of any other countries in which GMRS may be legal, but that doesn't mean
        there are none. Why would you assume otherwise about these services?

        Contact the Organization of American States (OAS) telecommunications
        office CITEL, for information on radio services available in other
        countries within Region 2:
        http://www.citel.oas.org/citel_i.asp

        Cheers, Alan
        WPUC720



        On Wed, 30 Apr 2003 17:29:02 -0700 (PDT) Tony Drake <tld53389@...>
        writes:

        You cannot use GMRS or FRS or even CB when in the
        jungles of central America.

        These are not legal for use outside the US and its
        territories/protectorates/etc.

        You could look at Ham radio, as it is international,
        and vhf/uhf allocations are international as well.

        Apart from that you will have to license specific
        frequencies from the governement of the country you
        are going to. I could not even suggest where to start,
        except the US State department or the consulate.

        <snip>

        --
      • Tony Drake
        Thanks for the info. I was basing my info on previous posts and info that I got that FRS was not legal elsewhere. CB is legal in a variety of places and modes,
        Message 3 of 17 , May 1, 2003
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          Thanks for the info. I was basing my info on previous
          posts and info that I got that FRS was not legal
          elsewhere. CB is legal in a variety of places and
          modes, but I believe US and Canada are the only two
          that have our exact system. (britain has 2 different
          ones, the EU has a different one, Australia has a
          couple, etc)

          That OAS link should be interesting.

          Tonyh
          --- wpuc720@... wrote:
          > That blanket statement is patently untrue. 11-meter
          > CB radio is
          > authorized in quite a few countries around the
          > world, many with the same
          > modes and channelization as the US. FRS as we know
          > it is authorized in
          > several countries in ITU Region 2 (the Western
          > Hemisphere). I am unaware
          > of any other countries in which GMRS may be legal,
          > but that doesn't mean
          > there are none. Why would you assume otherwise
          > about these services?
          >
          > Contact the Organization of American States (OAS)
          > telecommunications
          > office CITEL, for information on radio services
          > available in other
          > countries within Region 2:
          > http://www.citel.oas.org/citel_i.asp
          >
          > Cheers, Alan
          > WPUC720
          >
          >
          >
          > On Wed, 30 Apr 2003 17:29:02 -0700 (PDT) Tony Drake
          > <tld53389@...>
          > writes:
          >
          > You cannot use GMRS or FRS or even CB when in the
          > jungles of central America.
          >
          > These are not legal for use outside the US and its
          > territories/protectorates/etc.
          >
          > You could look at Ham radio, as it is international,
          > and vhf/uhf allocations are international as well.
          >
          > Apart from that you will have to license specific
          > frequencies from the governement of the country you
          > are going to. I could not even suggest where to
          > start,
          > except the US State department or the consulate.
          >
          > <snip>
          >
          > --
          >
          >
        • wpuc720@juno.com
          Australia has our exact same CB modes and channelization. EU has our same CB modes and channelization, but has FM and additional channels, as well. Mexico, and
          Message 4 of 17 , May 1, 2003
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            Australia has our exact same CB modes and channelization.

            EU has our same CB modes and channelization, but has FM and additional
            channels, as well.

            Mexico, and likely other CITEL member states, also has our exact same CB
            modes and channelization.

            Cheers,
            Alan



            On Thu, 1 May 2003 08:45:26 -0700 (PDT) Tony Drake <tld53389@...>
            writes:
            <snip>
            > CB is legal in a variety of places and
            > modes, but I believe US and Canada are the only two
            > that have our exact system. (britain has 2 different
            > ones, the EU has a different one, Australia has a
            > couple, etc)

            <snip>

            --
          • striplingp
            ... In addition to the Central America resources, check out the ARRL page http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/io/#IARP for how to get yourself
            Message 5 of 17 , May 1, 2003
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              --- In GMRS@yahoogroups.com, "Dave" <davekone@c...> wrote:
              > Would GMRS radios be a viable way to communicate while in the Jungle
              > of Central America? Is there a better way or another type of hand
              > held radio that might be best. Looking for something that has a 30-
              > 40 mile range.

              In addition to the Central America resources, check out the ARRL page
              http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/io/#IARP
              for how to get yourself authorized as a licensed amateur in Central
              American countries. Not all countries are signatories, so check the list.

              For a handheld radio in a jungle, I think you'll have trouble getting
              much beyond actual line of sight. The problem (from the ARRL page) is
              that you can be authorized either as a tech and use 30MHz and above or
              be a Tech Plus and use HF and higher frequencies. If you don't have
              International Morse Code, you are stuck in VHF/UHF, and I think that's
              not going to have the range you want from a handheld. If you are a
              tech plus or higher, you could try something like the Yaesu FT-817 on
              HF and VHF/UHF with external antennas up in the canopy.

              Good luck and have fun.

              Phil
            • John H. Guetherman
              ... Australian HF and UHF CB. http://www.geocities.com/acbroteam/beginner.htm ... additional channels, as well. ... same CB modes and channelization. ... I
              Message 6 of 17 , May 1, 2003
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                --- In GMRS@yahoogroups.com, wpuc720@j... wrote:
                > Australia has our exact same CB modes and channelization.
                >

                Australian HF and UHF CB.
                http://www.geocities.com/acbroteam/beginner.htm

                >
                > EU has our same CB modes and channelization, but has FM and
                additional channels, as well.
                >
                > Mexico, and likely other CITEL member states, also has our exact
                same CB modes and channelization.
                >

                I know I've seen a Great Britain listing, (not necessarily the same
                as the EU) but I don't know where. I have not seen a confirmation of
                Mexico's CB radio service, whether it's license-by-rule, or if it
                requires a license to be issued.

                >
                > Cheers,
                > Alan
                >

                John H. Guetherman
                KB7MIB/WPXJ598
                KAZ7FA/KBKF9922/SSB-83T
                Peoria, AZ.
              • wpuc720@juno.com
                Yeah, thanks John. I totally forgot about Austral UHF CB. Somewhere, I have this information in a link straight from the Austral Government. Can t find it,
                Message 7 of 17 , May 2, 2003
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                  Yeah, thanks John. I totally forgot about Austral UHF CB. Somewhere, I
                  have this information in a link straight from the Austral Government.
                  Can't find it, of course. They also have a commercial HF radiotelephone
                  service for the Outback, much like the old marine High Seas (R)
                  radiotelephone service.
                  Cheers, Alan


                  On Fri, 02 May 2003 02:23:38 -0000 "John H. Guetherman"
                  <jhguetherman@...> writes:

                  > --- In GMRS@yahoogroups.com, wpuc720@j... wrote:
                  > Australia has our exact same CB modes and channelization.

                  Australian HF and UHF CB.
                  http://www.geocities.com/acbroteam/beginner.htm

                  John H. Guetherman
                  KB7MIB/WPXJ598
                  KAZ7FA/KBKF9922/SSB-83T
                  Peoria, AZ.

                  --
                • Tony Drake
                  They have another HF service which is dedicated to the flying doctors...another outback based service. I found out when I was looking for rental ssb equipment.
                  Message 8 of 17 , May 2, 2003
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                    They have another HF service which is dedicated to the
                    flying doctors...another outback based service. I
                    found out when I was looking for rental ssb equipment.

                    There is still high seas HF radio...WLO in Alabama is
                    still online, even though all the other US based coast
                    stations went offline (AT&T said that with sattelite
                    there was no longer a need for them and it couldn't
                    afford to keep the running...now they are used for
                    sailmail and other email over HF services).

                    The Marine VHF marine operators are also offline as of
                    july 1. (AT&T pulled them years ago, maritel bought
                    them all up and linked them up, and then decided they
                    weren't profitable, so they are closing up shop on
                    July 1).

                    There still are such services in other countries, but,
                    for the most part they are going away, yielding to
                    cellular phones, iridium and globalstar, and inmarsat.

                    (sorry I know it was way off topic of GMRS, but I
                    thought it might be useful for someone to know since
                    it isn't highly publicized info).


                    Tony
                    --- wpuc720@... wrote:
                    > Yeah, thanks John. I totally forgot about Austral
                    > UHF CB. Somewhere, I
                    > have this information in a link straight from the
                    > Austral Government.
                    > Can't find it, of course. They also have a
                    > commercial HF radiotelephone
                    > service for the Outback, much like the old marine
                    > High Seas (R)
                    > radiotelephone service.
                    > Cheers, Alan
                    >
                    >
                    > On Fri, 02 May 2003 02:23:38 -0000 "John H.
                    > Guetherman"
                    > <jhguetherman@...> writes:
                    >
                    > > --- In GMRS@yahoogroups.com, wpuc720@j... wrote:
                    > > Australia has our exact same CB modes and
                    > channelization.
                    >
                    > Australian HF and UHF CB.
                    > http://www.geocities.com/acbroteam/beginner.htm
                    >
                    > John H. Guetherman
                    > KB7MIB/WPXJ598
                    > KAZ7FA/KBKF9922/SSB-83T
                    > Peoria, AZ.
                    >
                    > --
                    >
                    >
                  • John H. Guetherman
                    ... http://www.telstat.com.au/rfdshf.htm http://www.flyingdoctor.net/hfradio.htm Check the link to the UHF CB service on Telstat s site. Uniden UH090 HF/UHF
                    Message 9 of 17 , May 2, 2003
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                      --- In GMRS@yahoogroups.com, Tony Drake <tld53389@y...> wrote:
                      > They have another HF service which is dedicated to the
                      > flying doctors...another outback based service. I
                      > found out when I was looking for rental ssb equipment.
                      >

                      http://www.telstat.com.au/rfdshf.htm
                      http://www.flyingdoctor.net/hfradio.htm

                      Check the link to the UHF CB service on Telstat's site. Uniden UH090
                      HF/UHF dual-band CB Radio. If you'd like a dual-band HF/UHF CB radio,
                      move to Australia. *grin*

                      Also look at http://www.telstat.com.au/cb_info.htm for more info on
                      their HF and UHF CB radio services. Their UHF is 5 watts on 40
                      channels (8 repeater pairs, 2 telemetry channels, 30 simplex
                      channels), compared to our GMRS's 50 watts on the 8 main
                      repeater/simplex channels, or 5 watts ERP on the 7 interstital
                      simplex-only channels.

                      They've also got a 27 MHz/11meter Marine Band Down Under. 10 channels
                      27.680-27.980. http://www.vkham.com/AustCB.html and many others found
                      searching under "27 MHz Marine" (with the "").

                      Also check http://www.alphalink.com.au/~parkerp/radio.htm if you're
                      interested in more Australian stuff.

                      This should be my last off-topic post about this....

                      >
                      > Tony
                      >

                      John
                      KB7MIB/WPXJ598
                      Peoria, AZ.
                    • a049806t
                      I wonder what kind of radios the guerillas use?! I don t think you d get 30 miles on gmrs without a repeater on a very high mountain, but I think the guerillas
                      Message 10 of 17 , May 5, 2003
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                        I wonder what kind of radios the guerillas use?! I don't think you'd
                        get 30 miles on gmrs without a repeater on a very high mountain, but I
                        think the guerillas have control over that stuff, seriously! And watch
                        out for those disease carrying mosquitos! Did you know that there are
                        ants in those jungles that are strong enough to carry a human away?
                        It's true, saw it on the discovery channel. Be careful!!
                      • striplingp
                        ... Nah, he s gonna be in South and Cenral America. Guerrillas are only in Africa -- I saw it on the Discovery Channel. We ve got monkeys in the Western
                        Message 11 of 17 , May 6, 2003
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                          --- In GMRS@yahoogroups.com, "a049806t" <a049806t@y...> wrote:
                          > I wonder what kind of radios the guerillas use?! I don't think you'd
                          > get 30 miles on gmrs without a repeater on a very high mountain, but I
                          > think the guerillas have control over that stuff, seriously! And watch
                          > out for those disease carrying mosquitos! Did you know that there are
                          > ants in those jungles that are strong enough to carry a human away?
                          > It's true, saw it on the discovery channel. Be careful!!

                          Nah, he's gonna be in South and Cenral America. Guerrillas are only in
                          Africa -- I saw it on the Discovery Channel. We've got monkeys in the
                          Western Hemisphere, but no guerrillas.

                          Phil
                          :->
                        • Joe
                          ... Jungle ... sat comms either by phone or radio if it can work in the dessert why not the jungle. I have used radio when in hondurous due to the terain we
                          Message 12 of 17 , May 6, 2003
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                            --- In GMRS@yahoogroups.com, "Dave" <davekone@c...> wrote:
                            > Would GMRS radios be a viable way to communicate while in the
                            Jungle
                            > of Central America? Is there a better way or another type of hand
                            > held radio that might be best. Looking for something that has a 30-
                            > 40 mile range.
                            >
                            > Thanks
                            >
                            > David

                            sat comms either by phone or radio if it can work in the dessert why
                            not the jungle.

                            I have used radio when in hondurous due to the terain we were in made
                            or low band stuff unrelieable.

                            good luck
                          • Tony Drake
                            The problem with the jungle is that the dense overbrush canopy can block signals...I was reminded of this watching the eco-challenge this week...its the same
                            Message 13 of 17 , May 6, 2003
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                              The problem with the jungle is that the dense
                              overbrush canopy can block signals...I was reminded of
                              this watching the eco-challenge this week...its the
                              same reason why you can't use a GPS in the rain
                              forest.

                              Most sat stuff, even the best of it nowadays, requires
                              a line of sight to the sat's, or if its like iridium
                              or globalstar, straight up or to the horizon.

                              Tony
                              --- Joe <olderookie@...> wrote:
                              > --- In GMRS@yahoogroups.com, "Dave" <davekone@c...>
                              > wrote:
                              > > Would GMRS radios be a viable way to communicate
                              > while in the
                              > Jungle
                              > > of Central America? Is there a better way or
                              > another type of hand
                              > > held radio that might be best. Looking for
                              > something that has a 30-
                              > > 40 mile range.
                              > >
                              > > Thanks
                              > >
                              > > David
                              >
                              > sat comms either by phone or radio if it can work in
                              > the dessert why
                              > not the jungle.
                              >
                              > I have used radio when in hondurous due to the
                              > terain we were in made
                              > or low band stuff unrelieable.
                              >
                              > good luck
                              >
                              >
                              >
                            • wpuc720@juno.com
                              Trees: Jungle = Trees Desert = No trees On Tue, 06 May 2003 20:55:39 -0000 Joe writes: sat comms either by phone or radio if it
                              Message 14 of 17 , May 7, 2003
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                                Trees:
                                Jungle = Trees
                                Desert = No trees


                                On Tue, 06 May 2003 20:55:39 -0000 "Joe" <olderookie@...> writes:
                                <snip>

                                sat comms either by phone or radio if it can work in the dessert why not
                                the jungle[?]

                                <snip>

                                --
                              • Dave
                                Sorry I never got back to this, but I want to stay in touch with people back at camp while we are out exploring. David
                                Message 15 of 17 , May 9, 2003
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                                  Sorry I never got back to this, but I want to stay in touch with
                                  people back at camp while we are out exploring.

                                  David

                                  --- In GMRS@yahoogroups.com, Tony Drake <tld53389@y...> wrote:
                                  > You cannot use GMRS or FRS or even CB when in the
                                  > jungles of central America.
                                  >
                                  > These are not legal for use outside the US and its
                                  > territories/protectorates/etc.
                                  >
                                  > You could look at Ham radio, as it is international,
                                  > and vhf/uhf allocations are international as well.
                                  >
                                  > Apart from that you will have to license specific
                                  > frequencies from the governement of the country you
                                  > are going to. I could not even suggest where to start,
                                  > except the US State department or the consulate.
                                  > I just have to ask:
                                  > WHy do you want to communicate over 50 miles of jungle
                                  > in Central America?
                                  > --- Dave <davekone@c...> wrote:
                                  > > Would GMRS radios be a viable way to communicate
                                  > > while in the Jungle
                                  > > of Central America? Is there a better way or
                                  > > another type of hand
                                  > > held radio that might be best. Looking for
                                  > > something that has a 30-
                                  > > 40 mile range.
                                  > >
                                  > > Thanks
                                  > >
                                  > > David
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
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