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Re: [GMRS] Need some help

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  • Ed Greany
    Attached is your manual you need. It is available from the FCC website at
    Message 1 of 17 , May 31, 2009
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      Attached is your manual you need. It is available from the FCC website at
      <https://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/oetcf/eas/reports/ViewExhibitReport.cfm?mode=Exhibits&RequestTimeout=500&calledFromFrame=N&application_id=92693&fcc_id='ALH24623110'>
       
      73
       
      Ed

      --- On Sat, 5/30/09, todda323 <todda323@...> wrote:


      From: todda323 <todda323@...>
      Subject: [GMRS] Need some help
      To: GMRS@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, May 30, 2009, 9:31 AM








      Not entirely new to the world of UHF as I use one daily at work. Unfortunatley that is, for the most part, as far as my experience goes. An inlaw got some TK 380's years ago at a yard sale and I recently pulled them out of a stack of junk in his girrage. I was wondering how or if to incorperate these in to my family's prospected GMRS usage (pending license). So before I buy a license, new batteries and new chargers for these I was hoping some one could bring me up to speed a little. I have to appologize for my lack of knowledge on the subject but im here to learn. On the bubble pack radios purchased (easily replaced) for the kids there are multiple gmrs frequencies. Then there are 121? ctcss codes which can be applied for each individual frequency. Can this be done with the tk380 similarly so that I have the privacy interoperability between the cheapo radios the kids will carry and the good ones wife and I will carry? If out on a camping trip and a
      combination of frequency channell and ctcss code needs changing or modifying for privacy can this be accomplished? Keep in mind, I forget how, but I checked the FCC number in the back of the unit verifying it is capable of GMRS freq's.
      Next, I have been searching for a manual for these units, even on Kenwood site, with little success. I read in a post some where the manual may be posted on the FCC site. Does any one have any idea if this is true and how to access this information?
      Lastly, I have been reading of windows based programming software (KPG49D version 4.0 i think) which is alledgedly user friendly. There is only one shop in the area which will program Kenwoods and I spoke with the owner today. I'm not sure if he was on track with what I wanted to accomplish and the questions I asked regarding the CTCSS issues. He may have been and I'm not speaking ill of him in any way. Being as he stays so busy I'm not sure I asked my questions in an effecient manner. Any help would be very greatly appreciated.
















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    • Duane Vincent
      Regarding the privacy codes , they are one of the most misunderstood features of a radio.  What a privacy code (more properly referred to as a PL tone)
      Message 2 of 17 , May 31, 2009
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        Regarding the "privacy codes", they are one of the most misunderstood features of a radio.  What a "privacy code" (more properly referred to as a "PL" tone) does is to block audible reception of a signal not bearing the subaudible PL tone.  Thus, one does not have to listen to all of the chatter on a radio frequency.

        Using a radio that is not set up with a "PL" tone, all transmissions on that frequency will be heard.  Thus, there is no true privacy accorded for the user of that frequency.

        That having been said, it is still the responsibility of the licensee to listen to the frequency without the PL tone being activated to ensure that the frequency is not in use.  Failing to do this required monitoring can result in a more powerful transmitter "walking all over" the transmissions of a less powerful transmitter, blocking the signal from getting through.

        This was not an uncommon case with the local ambulance company, which did not follow the law and monitor the frequency before transmitting.  Every now and then the ambulance company would make communications difficult for those working for another agency on the same frequency while engaged in search and rescue operations.

        Duane
























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