Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Garlic

Expand Messages
  • Go Friend
    ... in just about everything. It also lowers blood pressure for those of you with that problem. OF course none of this is proven, but my blood pressure went
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 1, 2002
      >>No wonder my cholesterol is only 152. We put garlic
      in just about everything. It also lowers blood
      pressure for those of you with that problem. OF
      course none of this is proven, but my blood pressure
      went down and the stress level certainly didn't, if
      anything it got worse with David's diagnosis.
      Anne<<


      Arch Latinoam Nutr 2000 Sep;50(3):219-29 Related
      Articles, Books


      [Review: cardiovascular effect of garlic (Allium
      sativum)]

      [Article in Spanish]

      Garcia Gomez LJ, Sanchez-Muniz FJ.

      Departamento de Nutricion y Bromatologia I
      (Nutricion), Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad
      Complutense de Madrid, Madrid-Espana.

      Garlic has been used for centuries, and even nowadays
      is part of popular medicine in many cultures. New data
      have increased the interest in garlic and its role in
      normalization and treatment of cardiovascular disease
      risk factors. Recent studies have shown the complex
      composition of garlic, containing many compounds, that
      present potential positive effect in the field of
      health. The aim of the present paper was to review
      results of some studies that have found a relationship
      between garlic and cardiovascular diseases. From some
      of them it can be summarized that garlic can normalize
      plasma lipid, check lipid peroxidation, stimulate
      fibrinolytic activity, inhibit platelet aggregation,
      smooth the thickening and structural changes of artery
      wall related to aging and atherosclerosis, and
      decrease blood pressure. However, some other studies
      do not support these benefits. The positive effects
      found have promoted many study projects, nevertheless,
      the extract lability and the lack of result consensus
      call for a moderate consumption of garlic and garlic
      extracts. The composition variation due to gathering
      and aging together with the changes occurring in
      canning and industrial treatment makes necessary the
      application of some norms in the production and
      consumption of this functional food in order to
      guarantee its use in adequate form and doses.

      Publication Types:
      Review
      Review, Tutorial

      PMID: 11347290 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! Sports - sign up for Fantasy Baseball
      http://sports.yahoo.com
    • Doc
      There is a study on this but it doesnt implicate garlic in any potential effect on treatment. In the study one garlic capsule was administered twice a day and
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 3, 2002
        There is a study on this but it doesnt implicate garlic in any potential effect on treatment.

        In the study one garlic capsule was administered twice a day and very careful pharmacokinetics studies were performed. The results were dramatic: garlic reduces the levels of saquinavir by 50%. No data was presented about other antiretrovirals, but this study questions the use of these supplements concomitantly with protease inhibitors. The therapeutic implications of this are unknown.
        Saquinavir is used almost exclusively in combination with ritonavir, but no data was presented about the three-way interaction. It might be that ritonavir "compensates" for the effects of garlic.

        It is possible that these interactions will occur when you take an overdose of "pills" with such supplements. Natural garlic when taken in food should not cause any problem.

        Dr Sharat Misra MD,DM,FACG







        Although I am a strong proponent of complimentary
        medicines, I do have to say that I just read an
        article where it was shown that consumption of garlic
        decreased the levels in the body of some of the anti
        virals used in the treatment of HIV, and they were
        saying it might be a concern, since garlic is used by
        some HIV patients to control cholesterol, which tends
        to rise when one has AIDS. It didn't say efficacy was
        reduced, but levels were lowered which may result in
        diminished effectiveness. So even garlic may have
        some circumstances where it isn't harmless.





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.