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INFO:Risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma according to the titer of antibody to hepatitis C virus

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    Hepatogastroenterology 2001 Mar-Apr;48(38):498-501 Risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma according to the titer of antibody to hepatitis C virus. Hara M,
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 9, 2001
      Hepatogastroenterology 2001 Mar-Apr;48(38):498-501

      Risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma
      according to the titer of antibody to hepatitis C
      virus.
      Hara M, Mori M, Hara T, Yamamoto K, Honda M,
      Nishizumi M
      Department of Community Health Science, Saga
      Medical School, Nabeshima 5-1-1, Saga 849-8501,
      Japan. g9713@...-med.ac.jp
      [Medline record in process]

      BACKGROUND/AIMS: Hepatitis C virus infection has
      been reported to be one of the main risk factor
      for developing hepatocellular carcinoma in Japan.
      The aim of the study was to examine the
      differences in the risk of developing
      hepatocellular carcinoma according to the titer of
      antibody to HCV. METHODOLOGY: A total of 13,173
      inhabitants had their titers of anti-HCV examined
      based on a second generation passive
      hemagglutination assay, and we thus found 1,758
      inhabitants whose anti-HCV titers were equal to or
      above 2(5). After carefully comparing our findings
      with the list of hepatocellular carcinoma in the
      Saga Prefectural Cancer Registry, we ascertained
      45 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (males 37,
      females 8). The logistic regression model was used
      to estimate the Odds ratio of risk factors for
      hepatocellular carcinoma. RESULTS: The risk of
      hepatocellular carcinoma in the subjects from
      60-69 years of age was significantly higher than
      in the other age groups (Odds ratio = 3.88, P <
      0.01). The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in the
      males was also significantly higher than in the
      females (Odds ratio = 8.96, P < 0.001). The risk
      of hepatocellular carcinoma in the subjects with a
      titer of anti-HCV equal to or above 2(12) was
      significantly higher than in the subjects with a
      titer of less than 2(12) (Odds ratio = 33.46, P <
      0.001). Furthermore, the age- and sex-adjusted
      risk for developing hepatocellular carcinoma for
      the subjects with a titer equal to or above 2(12)
      was significantly higher than that for subjects
      with a titer of less than 2(12) (Odds ratio =
      32.56, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of
      developing hepatocellular carcinoma was
      significantly high in the subjects with a titer
      equal to or above 2(12). To measure the titer of
      anti-HCV is thus considered to be useful for
      effectively detecting infection in a mass
      screening program.


      Dr Sharat C Misra MD, DM
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