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NEWS: Significant Amounts of HCV RNA Found in Saliva of HIV-Coinfected Patients

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    Significant Amounts of HCV RNA Found in Saliva of HIV-Coinfected Patients WESTPORT, CT (Reuters Health) Mar 07 - Individuals infected with both HIV and
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 10, 2001
      Significant Amounts of HCV RNA Found in Saliva of
      HIV-Coinfected Patients


      WESTPORT, CT (Reuters Health) Mar 07 - Individuals
      infected with both HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV)
      often have significant amounts of the latter
      pathogen in their saliva, according to a report
      published in the February issue of the Journal of
      Medical Virology.
      Dr. D. Rey, from Hopitaux Universitaires in
      Strasbourg, France, and colleagues assessed the
      levels of HCV RNA in serum and saliva samples from
      59 HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Nested-PCR was
      used to detect the presence of HCV RNA and
      positive results were then quantified with b-DNA
      analysis.
      More than a third of patients had detectable
      levels of HCV RNA in their saliva and the mean
      level was 1.15 million genome equivalents per
      milliliter, the authors state. While age, immune
      status, and HIV risk group had no bearing on
      salivary positivity, a significantly greater
      proportion of men than women had detectable levels
      of HCV RNA in their saliva.
      The researchers detected HCV RNA in the serum of
      76.3% of patients and the mean level was 25.2
      million genome equivalents per milliliter. Serum
      positivity was not influenced by the patient's
      age, gender, or CD4+ cell count.
      There was no correlation between quantitative
      saliva and serum results, but qualitative results
      did show a significant direct association, the
      investigators note.
      "To our knowledge, this study is the first to find
      significant amounts of HCV RNA in saliva," the
      authors point out. This "could have important
      implications for hepatitis C epidemiology, as the
      origin of infection remains unknown in up to 40%
      of cases."
      J Med Virol 2001;63:117-119.

      Dr Sharat C Misra MD, DM
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