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Hepatitis C virus infection in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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  • claudine intexas
    Hepatitis C virus infection in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma [see comments] Ann Intern Med 1997 Sep 15;127(6):423-8 (ISSN: 0003-4819) Zuckerman
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 26 11:34 AM
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      Hepatitis C virus infection in patients with B-cell
      non-Hodgkin lymphoma [see comments]

      Ann Intern Med 1997 Sep 15;127(6):423-8 (ISSN:
      0003-4819)

      Zuckerman E; Zuckerman T; Levine AM; Douer D;
      Gutekunst K; Mizokami M; Qian DG; Velankar M; Nathwani
      BN; Fong TL [Find other articles with these Authors]
      University of Southern California School of Medicine,
      Los Angeles, USA.

      BACKGROUND: Several studies from Europe have reported
      a high prevalence (9% to 32%) of chronic hepatitis C
      virus (HCV) infection in patients with B-cell
      non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It has been suggested that HCV
      plays a role in the pathogenesis of B-cell non-Hodgkin
      lymphoma. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of
      HCV infection in patients with B-cell lymphoma in the
      United States. DESIGN: Controlled, cross-sectional
      analysis. SETTING: University medical center.
      PATIENTS: 120 patients with B-cell lymphoma (78% were
      Hispanic, 9% were black, 7% were Asian, and 6% were
      white), 154 patients with other malignant hematologic
      conditions (control group 1), and 114 patients with
      nonmalignant conditions (control group 2).
      MEASUREMENTS: Samples were tested for antibodies to
      HCV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hepatitis C
      virus RNA was detected by reverse-transcription
      polymerase chain reaction. Genotyping for HCV was done
      with genotype-specific primers from the HCV core
      region. RESULTS: Infection with HCV was detected in 26
      patients (22% [95% CI, 15% to 30%]) with B-cell
      lymphoma compared with 7 of 154 patients (4.5%) in
      control group 1 and 6 of 114 patients (5%) in control
      group 2 (P < 0.001). Risk factors for HCV infection
      were present in 15 patients (60%) with B-cell lymphoma
      and occurred a median of 15 years before diagnosis of
      lymphoma. Monocytoid B-cell lymphoma was the most
      common type of lymphoma found in HCV-positive patients
      (23% compared with 7% in HCV-negative patients) (P =
      0.034). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HCV infection
      was higher in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin
      lymphoma than in controls. The possible role of HCV in
      the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma warrants further
      investigation.

      Comment in: Ann Intern Med 1998 Apr 15; 128(8):695


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