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Hepatitis Neighborhood Hepatitis C and Weight Management

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  • Shshonee
    (I pasted just partial info from the article. You might want to read the part about carbs if you are a hepper considering Atkins, which according to this
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 20, 2004
      (I pasted just partial info from the article. You might want to read the part about carbs if you are a hepper considering Atkins, which according to this article would be a definite no no. As always, check with your doctor first before making any drastic changes to your diet.)

      http://www.hepatitisneighborhood.com/content/treatment_options/food_and_nutrition_1571.aspx?randStr=

      The Role the Liver in Nutrition

      The food we eat is broken down in the stomach and intestine. Nutrients pass through the intestine, are absorbed into the bloodstream and are transported to the liver.

      The body processes all foods into three basic components: carbohydrate, fat and protein. Carbohydrate and fat are the main sources of energy and protein is used by the body for growth and repair.

      In the liver, these nutrients are either stored or additionally processed, depending on the body's nutritional needs.

      Liver disease can interfere with the normal processing of nutrients, and this can present challenges for diet management in liver disease.

      As liver disease progresses, the liver may lose the ability to perform these functions. A weight management program for someone with HCV should accommodate variations in the liver's ability to process nutrients and waste products.



      The Role the Liver in Nutrition

      The food we eat is broken down in the stomach and intestine. Nutrients pass through the intestine, are absorbed into the bloodstream and are transported to the liver.

      The body processes all foods into three basic components: carbohydrate, fat and protein. Carbohydrate and fat are the main sources of energy and protein is used by the body for growth and repair.

      In the liver, these nutrients are either stored or additionally processed, depending on the body's nutritional needs.

      Liver disease can interfere with the normal processing of nutrients, and this can present challenges for diet management in liver disease.

      As liver disease progresses, the liver may lose the ability to perform these functions. A weight management program for someone with HCV should accommodate variations in the liver's ability to process nutrients and waste products.

      Proteins assist with tissue repair, and prevent fatty infiltration and additional damage to the liver cells.

      While too much protein can result in an increased amount of ammonia in the blood; too little protein can reduce healing of the liver. Doctors must carefully prescribe the correct amount of protein for a person with cirrhosis.

      People with liver disease require approximately 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight.

      For a 70 kilogram man (154 pounds), 70 grams of protein translates into 8 ounces of cooked protein and two 8-ounce glasses of milk per day.

      This does not include the protein from starches and vegetables.

      People with a severely damaged liver may be on strict protein restriction, and may be limited to only minimal quantities of essential amino acids, obtained through special nutritional supplements.

      Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates, found in "starchy" foods like bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, cereals, fruit and sugar candies are broken down in the liver to glucose. Glucose is the main "fuel" of the body.

      Surplus glucose is stored as glycogen in the liver and in some muscles. Glycogen can be quickly converted to glucose by the liver when the body needs extra energy.

      As well as storing glycogen, the liver helps to control the level of glucose in the blood, preventing low and high blood sugar levels (hypo- and hyperglycemia).

      Some weight loss plans advocate the near-total elimination of carbohydrates from the diet, suggesting that increasing the intake of dietary protein and fat will trigger the body to burn stored fat to generate energy.

      For people with liver disease, carbohydrates should be the major source of calories.

      When damaged by disease, the liver may become less efficient at converting carbohydrates and glycogen to glucose, so a greater proportion of carbohydrates in the diet can helps support the body's energy needs.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tatezi
      Great article, Alley....thanks for sharing it with us. Nutrition is so important to living with our dragon. Blessings Tatezi ... From: Shshonee To: happy
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 22, 2004
        Great article, Alley....thanks for sharing it with us. Nutrition is so important to living with our dragon.

        Blessings
        Tatezi
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Shshonee
        To: happy heppers ; GIWorld
        Sent: Monday, December 20, 2004 5:22 PM
        Subject: [GIWorld-Hepatitis] Hepatitis Neighborhood Hepatitis C and Weight Management



        The Role the Liver in Nutrition

        The food we eat is broken down in the stomach and intestine. Nutrients pass through the intestine, are absorbed into the bloodstream and are transported to the liver.
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