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Re: [GIWorld-Hepatitis] Car ribbon magnets & feedback

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  • claudine intexas
    My HCV awareness ribbon is yellow and red. I got it from Hepatitis Neighborhood. The debate on coffee goes on forever. I ve seen research that says it s bad,
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 17, 2004
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      My HCV awareness ribbon is yellow and red. I got it from Hepatitis Neighborhood.

      The debate on coffee goes on forever. I've seen research that says it's bad, and research that says it's not bad, and research that says it's good for you. I have actually seen more research that indicates coffee is good for the liver than harmful. I know Alley posted a recent article on research done in New Orleans which showed coffee was beneficial to people at risk of liver disease and a study done in Italy reported in 2001 concluded coffee lowered the risk of developing cirrhosis. (I'll paste it at the bottom of the page.) Since I love coffee and drink it daily, and have no intentions of giving it up, I choose to believe these reports! :)

      C

      Department of Statistics, Chair of Statistics in Medicine and
      Epidemiology,University of Milan-Bicocca,
      Via Bicocca degli Arcimboldi 8, 20126 Milan, Italy.
      giovanni.corrao@...

      PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of the consumption of
      caffeine-containing beverages on the risk of
      symptomatic liver cirrhosis (LC). METHODS: From 1994 to 1998, all the
      consecutive cirrhotic
      inpatients admitted in 19 collaborative hospitals for signs of liver
      decompensation in whom the
      diagnosis of liver cirrhosis was made for the first time (274 cases)
      and one or two gender, age, and
      place of residence pair matched individuals (458 controls) were
      recruited. Data on years of
      education, lifetime cigarette use, lifetime intake of alcohol- and
      caffeine-containing beverages, usual
      consumption of 180 food items, and on markers of hepatitis B and C
      viral infection were collected.
      RESULTS: A statistically significant trend toward
      lowered cirrhosis risk with increasing exposure to coffee was
      observed. The LC odds ratios
      decreased from 1.0 (reference category: lifetime abstainers from
      coffee) to 0.47 (95% confidence
      interval: 0.20, 1.10), 0.23 (0.10, 0.53), 0.21 (0.06, 0.74), and 0.16
      (0.05, 0.50) in 1, 2, 3, and 4 or
      more cups of coffee drinkers, respectively. There was no convincing
      evidence that coffee
      consumption modifies the effects of the known risk factors of liver
      cirrhosis (alcohol intake and viruses infection). CONCLUSIONS: These
      findings support the hypothesis that coffee, but not other beverages
      containing caffeine, may inhibit the onset of alcoholic and
      nonalcoholic liver cirrhosis.

      goddesspv@... wrote:
      Claudine,



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Shshonee (Alley)
      I m not much of a coffee drinker, but I ll convert it to tea and keep my tea lol I think I got my images from Hepatitis Central or something. You can order
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 17, 2004
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        I'm not much of a coffee drinker, but I'll convert it to tea and keep my tea lol

        I think I got my images from Hepatitis Central or something. You can order them online.

        Alley

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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