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Acetaminophen: a Killer With Many Weapons

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  • Shshonee (Alley)
    I have no idea what all those big words and abbreviations mean, but I know what the title means. Anyone care to translate?... Alley Acetaminophen: a Killer
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 6, 2004
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      I have no idea what all those big words and abbreviations mean, but I know what the title means. Anyone care to translate?... Alley

      Acetaminophen: a Killer With Many Weapons
      Controversy exists as to the relative contribution of necrosis versus apoptosis in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Kon et al. examined this issue in cultured mouse hepatocytes. The mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA) prevented early but not late MPT and cell killing in the presence of 10 mmol/L APAP. Treatment with the combination of fructose and glycine maintained cell ATP and prevented necrotic killing but did not prevent MPT while switching to increased caspase dependent apoptosis (Fig. 4). These findings indicate that APAP induces an early regulated MPT (CsA inhibitable) and late unregulated MPT (not CsA inhibitable). Maintenance of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels lead to a switch from necrosis to apoptosis in response to APAP-induced MPT. Since glycogen acts similarly to fructose in sustaining glycolytic ATP generation, the findings suggest that the mechanism of fasting-induced potentiation of APAP toxicity may be at least partly due to glycogen depletion and lessened ability to sustain ATP. The presumption is that switching from necrotic to apoptotic cell death may influence the severity of liver failure in vivo. Necrosis releases intracellular contents, which may promote inflammation and collateral damage. It remains to be seen whether switching to apoptosis will have an overall beneficial effect in vivo on the extent of organ damage or survival. (See HEPATOLOGY 2004;40:1170-1179.).

      http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/109712305/HTMLSTART


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    • AVansi7465@aol.com
      In a message dated 11/7/2004 2:24:47 AM Eastern Standard Time, shshonee@comcast.net writes: I have no idea what all those big words and abbreviations mean, but
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 7, 2004
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        In a message dated 11/7/2004 2:24:47 AM Eastern Standard Time,
        shshonee@... writes:

        I have no idea what all those big words and abbreviations mean, but I know
        what the title means. Anyone care to translate?... Alley



        A quick guess would be....don't take Acetominophin pain killers. Isn't that
        what Tylenol has in it?
        Anne


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      • Tatezi
        There has been a lot of research on Tylenol (acetominophin) being hard on the liver. And it s in a lot of prescription pain meds. I remember a particular study
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 7, 2004
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          There has been a lot of research on Tylenol (acetominophin) being hard on the liver. And it's in a lot of prescription pain meds. I remember a particular study where the conclusion was that it was hard enough on the liver that people who drink alcohol should never take tylenol.



          I have no idea what all those big words and abbreviations mean, but I know
          what the title means. Anyone care to translate?... Alley



          A quick guess would be....don't take Acetominophin pain killers. Isn't that
          what Tylenol has in it?
          Anne




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Shshonee (Alley)
          Yes Tylenol is aceto whatever and yes it is hard on the liver. Always has been, always will be (until they change the chemistry). If you were around when it
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 7, 2004
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            Yes Tylenol is aceto whatever and yes it is hard on the liver. Always has been, always will be (until they change the chemistry). If you were around when it first got approved and read about the history, you'd know the crap that went on to get it approved. FDA doesn't force companies to do long term studies anymore. So how in the heck would they know if it did liver damage? The proof is in the ER room. Ask any ER nurse or doctor.

            Alley

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