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Re: [GEO-Subscribers] Kosmos/Iridium satellite collision.

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  • geojohnt@aol.com
    In a message dated 28/02/2009 15:43:46 GMT Standard Time, gm8arv@yahoo.co.uk writes: What a mess! Those responsible should be made to go and clear it up....
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 1, 2009
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      In a message dated 28/02/2009 15:43:46 GMT Standard Time, gm8arv@...
      writes:

      What a mess! Those responsible should be made to go and clear it up....

      <G>

      ... leading to the question of who /was/ responsible?


      David,

      Well, it was bound to happen sooner or later?

      One of the satellites was travelling W to E and the other S to N.
      _www.spaceweather.com_ (http://www.spaceweather.com) (if you do a search)
      has an animation of their paths just before the collision.

      I wonder how many other satellite are on a collision course 'some time' in
      the future?

      Regards,
      John.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Alan Banks
      Hi John and David, The easy answer to David s question is - everyone who sends stuff up into orbit. There was no coordination from the outset (natural at the
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 1, 2009
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        Hi John and David,
        The easy answer to David's question is - everyone who sends stuff up
        into orbit. There was no coordination from the outset (natural at the
        time) and there is very little now.
        Few satellites have a 'planned demise' when they die. Geostationary sats
        'may' get parked in a graveyard orbit and some low altitude orbiters may
        have a planned or not burn up. The Russians seem to have lots of dead
        sats still in orbit and don't forget it was them plastered radioactive
        material over a large part of Canada.
        You only have to run the 3d version of WxTrack to see the bees round the
        hive to realise it will happen again.
        How often it will happen is probably pretty rare. Deliberate hits (a la
        Chinese) arr hard enough. In this case a second either side would have
        meant a miss.
        Any new shuttle design 'should' have a 'dustcart' facility and dedicated
        'bin men' or 'orbital debris recovery operatives' on minimum wage but
        they can keep the proceeds of their recoveries. :-).

        Alan

        geojohnt@... wrote:
        >
        > In a message dated 28/02/2009 15:43:46 GMT Standard Time, gm8arv@...
        > writes:
        >
        > What a mess! Those responsible should be made to go and clear it up....
        >
        > <G>
        >
        > ... leading to the question of who /was/ responsible?
        >
        >
        > David,
        >
        > Well, it was bound to happen sooner or later?




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      • Douglas Deans
        ... From: To: Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2009 12:02 PM Subject: Re: [GEO-Subscribers] Kosmos/Iridium
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 1, 2009
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <geojohnt@...>
          To: <GEO-Subscribers@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2009 12:02 PM
          Subject: Re: [GEO-Subscribers] Kosmos/Iridium satellite collision.


          >
          > In a message dated 28/02/2009 15:43:46 GMT Standard Time,
          > gm8arv@...
          > writes:
          >
          > What a mess! Those responsible should be made to go and clear it up....
          >
          > <G>
          >
          > ... leading to the question of who /was/ responsible?
          >
          >
          > David,
          >
          > Well, it was bound to happen sooner or later?
          >
          > One of the satellites was travelling W to E and the other S to N.
          > _www.spaceweather.com_ (http://www.spaceweather.com) (if you do a
          > search)
          > has an animation of their paths just before the collision.
          >
          > I wonder how many other satellite are on a collision course 'some time' in
          > the future?
          >
          > Regards,
          > John.

          John, fast forward WXTrack to about 12 or 13 September 2009 and the answer
          is NOAA 18 and 19 !!!

          Regards
          Douglas.
        • geojohnt@aol.com
          In a message dated 01/03/2009 13:29:45 GMT Standard Time, dsdeans@tiscali.co.uk writes: John, fast forward WXTrack to about 12 or 13 September 2009 and the
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 1, 2009
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            In a message dated 01/03/2009 13:29:45 GMT Standard Time,
            dsdeans@... writes:

            John, fast forward WXTrack to about 12 or 13 September 2009 and the answer
            is NOAA 18 and 19 !!!


            Douglas,

            Er, they are both going in the same direction though and if one is catching
            the other up then it's at a slightly different altitude?

            Regards,
            John.




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Douglas Deans
            ... From: To: Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2009 2:52 PM Subject: Re: [GEO-Subscribers] Kosmos/Iridium satellite
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 1, 2009
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              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <geojohnt@...>
              To: <GEO-Subscribers@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2009 2:52 PM
              Subject: Re: [GEO-Subscribers] Kosmos/Iridium satellite collision.


              >
              > In a message dated 01/03/2009 13:29:45 GMT Standard Time,
              > dsdeans@... writes:
              >
              > John, fast forward WXTrack to about 12 or 13 September 2009 and the
              > answer
              > is NOAA 18 and 19 !!!
              >
              >
              > Douglas,
              >
              > Er, they are both going in the same direction though and if one is
              > catching
              > the other up then it's at a slightly different altitude?
              >
              > Regards,
              > John.

              Yes I do realise that (I think they are about 10 km apart). Just light
              heartedly taking the opportunity to point out that meteorologically speaking
              they are a bit of a waste of space for a while. By then NOAA 19 should be
              the operational craft if commissioning goes well (and it is at the moment).

              Regards
              Douglas.
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