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Re: Hurricanes John and Kristy

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  • Ap van Weeren
    ... Nice pic Chuck, keep also an eye on Ioke, passed Wake Island (people evacuated to Hawaii), with a lot of damage and expected to be cat 4 for the next 4
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
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      --- In GEO-Subscribers@yahoogroups.com, Chuck Vaughn <aa6g@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hurricane John has been getting some press as it skirts the SW coast
      > of Mexico. NOAA14 this morning also captured the smaller Hurricane
      > Kristy west of John so they made a nice pair.
      >
      > http://images.aa6g.org/noaa14-200608311649.jpg
      >
      > Chuck
      >

      Nice pic Chuck, keep also an eye on Ioke, passed Wake Island (people
      evacuated to Hawaii), with a lot of damage and expected to be cat 4
      for the next 4 days.
      see:
      http://forecast.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/shadow/tracker/dynamic/main.html

      Gr, Ap
    • geojohnt@aol.com
      In a message dated 31/08/2006 21:57:40 GMT Daylight Time, aa6g@aa6g.org writes: Hurricane John has been getting some press as it skirts the SW coast of Mexico.
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 2, 2006
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        In a message dated 31/08/2006 21:57:40 GMT Daylight Time, aa6g@...
        writes:

        Hurricane John has been getting some press as it skirts the SW coast
        of Mexico. NOAA14 this morning also captured the smaller Hurricane
        Kristy west of John so they made a nice pair.

        _http://images.http://imhttp://images.<Whttp://_
        (http://images.aa6g.org/noaa14-200608311649.jpg)


        Chuck,

        Many thanks for this very interesting image.
        Amazing to see two so close.
        I'm sure I commented to you some years ago that I was surprised at the
        number of hurricanes off the W coast of America (that you were posting images of)
        - we don't hear of them - just the ones coming across the Atlantic on the
        other side.

        Do any make landfall as 'hurricanes' and cause considerable damage?
        Or have they dissipated into tropical storms by then?

        Regards,
        John Tellick.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • geojohnt@aol.com
        In a message dated 01/09/2006 11:24:06 GMT Daylight Time, apvweeren@yahoo.com writes: Nice pic Chuck, keep also an eye on Ioke, passed Wake Island (people
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 2, 2006
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          In a message dated 01/09/2006 11:24:06 GMT Daylight Time,
          apvweeren@... writes:

          Nice pic Chuck, keep also an eye on Ioke, passed Wake Island (people
          evacuated to Hawaii), with a lot of damage and expected to be cat 4
          for the next 4 days.
          see:
          _http://forecast.http://fohttp://forecahttp://forecast.http://fo_
          (http://forecast.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/shadow/tracker/dynamic/main.html)


          Hi Ap,

          At last, I've got a name for the typhoon I've been tracking for over a week
          now via GOES-W and MTSAT - IOKE.
          It's showing a very good eye on MTSAT IR.

          Thanks for the useful link also.

          Regards,
          John Tellick


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Chuck Vaughn
          Hi John, The eastern Pacific hurricanes have a very typical pattern that they follow. They all form just off the southwest coast of Mexico around 10 - 15
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 2, 2006
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            Hi John,

            The eastern Pacific hurricanes have a very typical pattern that they
            follow. They all form just off the southwest coast of Mexico around
            10 - 15 degrees north. Early in the season (June - August) they all
            move west-north-west until they reach cooler water and dissipate.
            Frequently the remains get caught up in an upper level southwest flow
            and stream over California producing high and sometimes mid level
            clouds. Very rarely do we get any rain from them.

            Starting around now as the Mexican monsoon begins to weaken and the
            eastern Pacific southwest flow begins to move farther south with the
            approaching Fall, the WNW path of the hurricanes is impeded and they
            turn more north or even northeast in Mexico. This is what happened to
            Hurricane John. Usually they dissipate enough so Mexico doesn't get
            clobbered with a category 3 or 4 storm. Sometimes late in the season
            the remains from these storms will move up over Arizona and give the
            desert a drenching rain but no wind.

            It's not unusual for there to be a large number of named eastern
            Pacific storms. Since I've been paying attention to them, I'd say
            this year is normal. The last couple of years have been far below
            average. I don't know if this is related to the high Atlantic
            hurricane activity. It's interesting to note that with the more
            average eastern Pacific hurricane activity this year, that the
            Atlantic hurricane activity has been more average too.

            Chuck


            >
            > In a message dated 31/08/2006 21:57:40 GMT Daylight Time,
            > aa6g@...
            > writes:
            >
            > Hurricane John has been getting some press as it skirts the SW coast
            > of Mexico. NOAA14 this morning also captured the smaller Hurricane
            > Kristy west of John so they made a nice pair.
            >
            > _http://images.http://imhttp://images.<Whttp://_
            > (http://images.aa6g.org/noaa14-200608311649.jpg)
            >
            >
            > Chuck,
            >
            > Many thanks for this very interesting image.
            > Amazing to see two so close.
            > I'm sure I commented to you some years ago that I was surprised at the
            > number of hurricanes off the W coast of America (that you were
            > posting images of)
            > - we don't hear of them - just the ones coming across the Atlantic
            > on the
            > other side.
            >
            > Do any make landfall as 'hurricanes' and cause considerable damage?
            > Or have they dissipated into tropical storms by then?
            >
            > Regards,
            > John Tellick.
          • Dale Ireland
            Chuck It is amazing how predictable the eastern pacific hurricane pattern is each year I will bet that the Island of Socorro 19N 111W is the most hurricane
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 2, 2006
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              Chuck
              It is amazing how predictable the eastern pacific hurricane pattern is each
              year> I will bet that the Island of Socorro 19N 111W is the most hurricane
              prone place on Earth. A season never passes without it getting multiple
              tropical or hurricane events.
              It is also interesting that right now former hurricane Kristy has done a
              U-Turn and is dissipating while on an unusual SE course
              http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

              Mexico has a nice set of coastal Doppler radars which made it interesting to
              follow hurricane John's landfall yesterday and today
              http://smn.cna.gob.mx/radares/radares.html

              Too bad they don't have (or I can't find) an archive or animated loops.

              Dale

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: GEO-Subscribers@yahoogroups.com
              > [mailto:GEO-Subscribers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Chuck Vaughn
              > Sent: Saturday, September 02, 2006 8:29 AM
              > To: GEO-Subscribers@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [GEO-Subscribers] Hurricanes John and Kristy
              >
              > Hi John,
              >
              > The eastern Pacific hurricanes have a very typical pattern
              > that they follow. They all form just off the southwest coast
              > of Mexico around 10 - 15 degrees north. Early in the season
              > (June - August) they all move west-north-west until they
              > reach cooler water and dissipate.
              > Frequently the remains get caught up in an upper level
              > southwest flow and stream over California producing high and
              > sometimes mid level clouds. Very rarely do we get any rain from them.
              >
              > Starting around now as the Mexican monsoon begins to weaken
              > and the eastern Pacific southwest flow begins to move farther
              > south with the approaching Fall, the WNW path of the
              > hurricanes is impeded and they turn more north or even
              > northeast in Mexico. This is what happened to Hurricane John.
              > Usually they dissipate enough so Mexico doesn't get clobbered
              > with a category 3 or 4 storm. Sometimes late in the season
              > the remains from these storms will move up over Arizona and
              > give the desert a drenching rain but no wind.
              >
            • geojohnt@aol.com
              Hi Chuck, Many thanks for your information regarding eastern Pacific hurricanes - interesting. And for your nice images. Now that we have Hi-Res images from
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 4, 2006
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                Hi Chuck,

                Many thanks for your information regarding eastern Pacific hurricanes -
                interesting.
                And for your nice images.

                Now that we have Hi-Res images from GOES-E, GOES-W, MTSAT and IODC (as
                opposed to - for most - WEFAX previously) via EUMETCast, tracking hurricanes has a
                whole new meaning.

                Let's hope the rest of the season, for you all, remains 'average?'

                Regards,
                John.


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