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Re: Sexism at the Edgars

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  • Alan Mescallado
    Ah, yes, the remarkable Mr. Penzler. I remember as a young man I was the unfortunate recipient of his wrath. I inquired about a book and when I failed to
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 30, 2005
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      Ah, yes, the remarkable Mr. Penzler. I remember as a young man I was
      the unfortunate recipient of his wrath. I inquired about a book and
      when I failed to respond quickly to his successful search, received a
      scathing rebuke about my unprofessionalism and lack of seriousness. In
      succint prose he castigated me for wasting his time. In my defence, it
      was a time when I still resided in a third world country (he gave a
      deadline for my response, but by the time the letter arrived, the
      deadline was two weeks past) that was under a dictatorship, so even
      getting the US funds to pay for the book would take time and lots of
      paperwork. Also, I was young and careless. Despite the humiliation I
      received, he earned my respect. I learned to take the role of book
      collector seriously and treat booksellers even more seriously.
      Now for his comments.
      I am not sure that Penzler is a sexist. Call him elitist, for every
      man has his meat. When Wilson questioned the value of detective
      stories, he seemed to have changed his mind about the people who wrote
      them when he got to Sherlock Holmes. Wilson may not have cared for
      mysteries, but he cared about writing. Penzler, for his part and
      experience (as editor and publisher), knows what he likes. Cosies are
      not his cup of tea. For his part, he can't find a cosy "well-written"
      enough to maintain his interest. He prefers "deep" writing and it's
      debatable if any of his choices of stories for his anthologies are
      badly-written. Even as one poster mentioned he selected stories that
      feature violence against women, Penzler is not one to quibble about
      plot if the prose is strong enough to satisy his taste. He published
      Spillane's latest books (wherein Spillane showed some maturity), but I
      doubt if he will publish the early works (if he started publishing
      then). By the way, he also published Charlotte MacLeod. He must have
      seen something in her (I tried reading MacLeod but is that enamored of
      her works).
      Does anyone know what his opinions are of Paretsky, Grafton and
      Evanovich?

      Alan M


      --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Jon Jermey" <jonjermey@o...>
      wrote:
      > Ah, never let your opinions get in the way when there's a chance of
      making
      > money...
      >
      > And Penzler has never said that cosies are unpopular, merely that he
      doesn't
      > like them. In fact it may be because they are so popular - and he's
      losing
      > his audience - that he feels compelled to speak out against them. As
      we in
      > Australia know, nobody else can be quite so rude about a group as
      their
      > former leader.
      >
      > Jon.
    • Wyatt James
      We have Edgars, Anthonys, and Creaseys. Perhaps there should be a new award, the Julian, for people like Penzler, just as there should be the Keeler award for
      Message 2 of 16 , May 2 7:01 PM
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        We have Edgars, Anthonys, and Creaseys. Perhaps there should be a new
        award, the Julian, for people like Penzler, just as there should be
        the Keeler award for off-the-wall detection. The dark side needs to be
        acknowledged too.


        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, MG4273@a... wrote:
        > In a message dated 05-04-29 12:31:03 EDT, Xavier writes:
        >
        > << Crazy Otto doesn't hate women; he just
        > hates the kind of mysteries they (well, most of them) write >>
        >
        > In the latest Penzler edited "Best American Mystery Short Stories of
        the
        > Year", the villian in one of the tales turns out to be an Evil
        Lesbian. Not to
        > worry - the detective "hero" drives her to her death. In another
        tale, the "hero"
        > gratuitously shoots the femme fatale at at the end - after calling
        an Arab
        > character by an ugly name.
        > This sort of thing is straight misogyny, homophobia and bigotry. It
        is really
        > inexecusable. Why is he praising stories that glorify violence
        against women?
        > And against gay people? Don't both groups suffer from enough
        violence in real
        > life?
        > Now he's saying women writers are not artists.
        > It's time to wake up and smell the coffee here.
        >
        > Mike Grost
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