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Re: Tired of detective stories

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  • Barry Ergang
    ... Not to the point of never wanting to read another one, but yes, I find myself needing a break from them now and then. It s why, for instance, I recently
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 30, 2005
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      --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Nicholas Fuller <stoke_moran@y...>
      wrote:
      >Has anyone ever reached that point where you're just sick to death of
      >detectve stories?

      Not to the point of never wanting to read another one, but yes, I find
      myself needing a break from them now and then. It's why, for instance,
      I recently decided to reread HUCKLBERRY FINN, which I finished
      yesterday. Last year, Michael Chabon's excellent THE AMAZING
      ADVENTURES OF KAVALIER & CLAY provided a nice respite.

      Another thing I frequently do is vary my mystery reading with
      sub-genres. So it might be a Golden Age (or Golden Age-type) story or
      novel followed by one that's hardboiled or noirish. For further
      variety, I'll throw a thriller or suspenser into the mix.
    • twoshed2000
      Strangely enough I am never sick of them as long as I am in the authentic place for it ,the UK ,where I spend a bit less than half a year.The other
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 4 2:36 AM
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        Strangely enough I am never sick of them as long as I am in the
        authentic place for it ,the UK ,where I spend a bit less than half a
        year.The other time,leaving the 'scenery' I find it much harder to
        focus on detective fiction.
        At the moment I am just in Korea and Punshon's excellent "Ten Star
        clues",which I started with great elan during the trip is now
        halfread since I started eating this food here,hearing a language
        which is alien and being in totally new surroundings.
        In 3 days time I will be back on English soil,sit in my cottage
        garden,stroke my cats and then it will be finished in no time.
        For me literature has a very strong local flair and connotation.
        But I doubt that I ever would get tired of reading mysteries granted
        that it is a varied diet.
        AND -- and this is a big 'AND' -- I am nowhere near in the league of
        Nick,whoses experience in the field is stupendous.
        In my own epert field though(classical music) I have similar heretic
        thoughts from time to time as
        sometimes I am forced to go to concerts,which is -ask any pro- not a
        favorite activity enjoyed by musicians.
        The audience around me is usually grateful and happy and I am
        sitting there with a sour face and wanting to leave half of the
        time,as when one knows every second of something it unfortunately
        takes out the joy and one is not "naive"(in the best sense!) enough
        to enjoy any more.
        The faults Nick spots more or less mercilessly in a book I hear
        sometimes already after a few bars of a piece of music and out goes
        the fun.
        Still,I am always surprised how flexible the GA field is,and from
        Futrelle's short puzzles to Punshon's elaborate works,from Dorothy
        Bower's excellent works(what a fabulous style she wrote in!) to
        lonely works like Kindon's "Murder on the Moor":
        there is lots of enjoyment there,but I am a youngster in the field
        (not in age,hell no,there are crumbling bits now here and there),but
        I still have many white areas on my mystery map so I will be happily
        plodding along for some time.
        Spotting the villain early doesn't happen to me that often,I quite
        enjoy being fooled,but dry and routine writing....well this is a
        niusance if the plot is weak.Point taken,such books are a waste of
        timeI.Off they go to the Charity shop.
        twoshed (¤¸¤§°Ü¤Ë¤Á)
        GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Nicholas Fuller
        <stoke_moran@y...> wrote:
        > Has anyone ever reached that point where you're just sick to death
        of detectve stories?
      • vegetableduck
        Hi again everyone. I went through a period in college and law school (1983-1990) where I stopped reading them altogether. Then, when browsing a Chicago
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 4 4:03 PM
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          Hi again everyone.

          I went through a period in college and law school (1983-1990) where
          I stopped reading them altogether. Then, when browsing a Chicago
          basement bookstore in 1990, I came across those snazzy IPL paperback
          Carr editions and was enticed back in again. In the 1990s, seeking
          my Ph.D. in American history, I was moving far afield from British
          GADS authors (or so it seemed), but I read them in my leisure time.
          Now, since taking up this GADS history book project several years
          ago, I'm been reading them every day. But this is research work, so
          it's no different from reading blurry microfilmed nineteenth-century
          newspapers, for example. In this sense, even bad books can have
          interest, historical interest. Admittedly, it's a relief to switch
          authors. It gets maddening after a while seeing, yet again, Eden
          Phillpotts use the term "the rising generation" or Anthony Gilbert
          refer to "flotsam and jetsam." This is work, so what can one do,
          but some variation in one's leisure reading surely is a good thing.
          Even the best writers in the field are still writing genre
          literature, after all, and it's nice to take a break from that
          occasionally.

          The thirties unquestionably saw great improvement in the British
          detective story. Even much of the Christie of the twenties is,
          let's be honest, not so good. In this decade there are too many
          country houses, too many jewel thefts, too many bright young people,
          too many gangs of crooks. It took a while to shake off these
          established conventions. And what once seemed highly original, the
          plotting mechanics of Crofts, came to seem dull and predicatable to
          many over time. How many people today really do enjoy those
          confounded timetables, I've often wondered!

          Curt

          --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "twoshed2000" <twoshed2000@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Strangely enough I am never sick of them as long as I am in the
          > authentic place for it ,the UK ,where I spend a bit less than half
          a
          > year.The other time,leaving the 'scenery' I find it much harder to
          > focus on detective fiction.
          > At the moment I am just in Korea and Punshon's excellent "Ten Star
          > clues",which I started with great elan during the trip is now
          > halfread since I started eating this food here,hearing a language
          > which is alien and being in totally new surroundings.
          > In 3 days time I will be back on English soil,sit in my cottage
          > garden,stroke my cats and then it will be finished in no time.
          > For me literature has a very strong local flair and connotation.
          > But I doubt that I ever would get tired of reading mysteries
          granted
          > that it is a varied diet.
          > AND -- and this is a big 'AND' -- I am nowhere near in the league
          of
          > Nick,whoses experience in the field is stupendous.
          > In my own epert field though(classical music) I have similar
          heretic
          > thoughts from time to time as
          > sometimes I am forced to go to concerts,which is -ask any pro- not
          a
          > favorite activity enjoyed by musicians.
          > The audience around me is usually grateful and happy and I am
          > sitting there with a sour face and wanting to leave half of the
          > time,as when one knows every second of something it unfortunately
          > takes out the joy and one is not "naive"(in the best sense!)
          enough
          > to enjoy any more.
          > The faults Nick spots more or less mercilessly in a book I hear
          > sometimes already after a few bars of a piece of music and out
          goes
          > the fun.
          > Still,I am always surprised how flexible the GA field is,and from
          > Futrelle's short puzzles to Punshon's elaborate works,from Dorothy
          > Bower's excellent works(what a fabulous style she wrote in!) to
          > lonely works like Kindon's "Murder on the Moor":
          > there is lots of enjoyment there,but I am a youngster in the field
          > (not in age,hell no,there are crumbling bits now here and
          there),but
          > I still have many white areas on my mystery map so I will be
          happily
          > plodding along for some time.
          > Spotting the villain early doesn't happen to me that often,I quite
          > enjoy being fooled,but dry and routine writing....well this is a
          > niusance if the plot is weak.Point taken,such books are a waste of
          > timeI.Off they go to the Charity shop.
          > twoshed (¤¸¤§°Ü¤Ë¤Á)
          > GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Nicholas Fuller
          > <stoke_moran@y...> wrote:
          > > Has anyone ever reached that point where you're just sick to
          death
          > of detectve stories?
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