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Re: The man behind the Hardy Boys Nancy Drew

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  • MG4273@aol.com
    My favorite teen sleuth as a kid was neither Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys, but Kay Tracy. Her book The Mansion of Secrets deals with an old house more full
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 5, 2004
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      My favorite teen sleuth as a kid was neither Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys,
      but Kay Tracy. Her book "The Mansion of Secrets" deals with an old house more
      full of secret passages than "The Cat and the Canary" and Udolpho put together.
      Pure bliss for an 11 year-old.
      As long as secret passages are not used to "solve" impossible crimes, they
      are a lot of fun. British Golden Age writers such as R.A.J. Walling sometimes
      included them in their books.
      Very interesting article!

      Mike Grost
    • brucknerfan1951
      A newspaper feature several years ago postulated that the evolution of the Nancy Drew character over the decades reflected the evolution in the status of women
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 6, 2004
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        A newspaper feature several years ago postulated that the evolution
        of the Nancy Drew character over the decades reflected the evolution
        in the status of women and girls in American society. One thing that
        is clear from the outset of the two series is that Nancy is in a
        higher socioeconomic category than the Hardy Boys. She is the
        daughter of a lawyer and has her own car, whereas the Hardy Boys are
        the sons of a retired New York City police detective who has gone
        into private practice, and they are lucky to have motorcycles at the
        beginning of the series before the rewards from their solving of
        mysteries enable them to get a boat and a car. Mrs. Hardy works at
        home, unless trips out of town turn the family over to the tender
        mercies of Aunt Gertrude (I suspect that Aunt Gertrude was more than
        Mrs. Hardy could put up with for very long.) As the newspaper
        article put it, Nancy Drew fulfilled the dream of not having a mother
        to interfere with her sleuthing and was able to run her own household
        through the housekeeper, and as an only child did not have to share
        the attention of her father with any siblings. Her two girlfriends
        George and Bess reflected the complementary assertive and passive
        sides of being a girl in that society. Ned Nickerson her boyfriend
        was around when Nancy needed him and even jealous of other boys if
        they showed up, but made no demands upon Nancy that restricted her
        freedom. Supposedly this emancipated Nancy in the early years of the
        series (the 1930s) gave way to a more traditional character as
        America went through World War Two and into the 1950s, then Nancy
        became more emancipated again in later decades. Comparatively
        speaking, the Hardy Boys did not undergo such a social change. --
        Warren




        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Emily Wagner <nativedenver@y...>
        wrote:
        > It has been many years since I read Nancy Drew or the
        > Hardy Boys, but my recollection is that, while there
        > may have been an Aunt Gertrude (I remember her only
        > from the MMC, and not from the books), there is
        > definitely a Mrs. Hardy.
        >
        > In the Cliff House, or whatever it was called, she
        > receives the letter from her husband and is disturbed
        > that he did not include their secret sign, which is
        > what tipped her off that all was not well.
        >
        > There is, on the other hand, no Mrs. Drew. Mr. Drew is
        > a widower, and the family is looked after by Hannah,
        > the housekeeper.
        >
        > Emily
        >
        > --- aria376 <aria376@y...> wrote:
        >
        > > That's what I recall too, Barry. "Aunt Gertrude"
        > > even made the television transition when
        > > The Hardy Boys first appeared (on The Mickey Mouse
        > > Club).
        >
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      • Emily Wagner
        ... I have not read any of the current Hardy Boys books, but I have glanced through a couple of them at the bookstore, and it seems to me that they are now
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 6, 2004
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          --- brucknerfan1951 <Brucknerfan1951@...> wrote:

          > Comparatively
          > speaking, the Hardy Boys did not undergo such a
          > social change. --

          I have not read any of the current Hardy Boys books,
          but I have glanced through a couple of them at the
          bookstore, and it seems to me that they are now
          reflective of what passes for "drama" on television
          these days. That is, there is not so much "detection"
          as there are explosions and car chases and fights.

          I notice that they also killed off at least one of
          their girlfriends from the old days, the one with the
          oldest-fashioned name.

          Perhaps I'm not being entirely fair, but it was enough
          to put me off wanting to read them.

          I also notice that they are releasing a number of
          other children's mystery series that I remember from
          my childhood. I saw Trixie Belden in the store, and I
          think I even saw some Bobbsey Twins.

          Emily

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        • Christian Henriksson
          ... No! Did they kill Iola Morton? Say it ain t so... She was my favouritest girl back when. Christian Henriksson (christianhenriksson@telia.com) -- The human
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 6, 2004
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            Lo and behold, on 6 Nov 2004 at 8:31, Emily Wagner sayeth thus:

            >
            > --- brucknerfan1951 <Brucknerfan1951@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Comparatively
            > > speaking, the Hardy Boys did not undergo such a
            > > social change. --
            >
            > I have not read any of the current Hardy Boys books,
            > but I have glanced through a couple of them at the
            > bookstore, and it seems to me that they are now
            > reflective of what passes for "drama" on television
            > these days. That is, there is not so much "detection"
            > as there are explosions and car chases and fights.
            >
            > I notice that they also killed off at least one of
            > their girlfriends from the old days, the one with the
            > oldest-fashioned name.


            No! Did they kill Iola Morton? Say it ain't so...

            She was my favouritest girl back when.

            Christian Henriksson
            (christianhenriksson@...)
            --
            The human race, to which so many of my
            readers belong.
            - G. K. Chesterton
          • Emily Wagner
            ... Indeed. With a car bomb, no less... Emily __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 6, 2004
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              --- Christian Henriksson
              <christian.henriksson@...> wrote:
              > No! Did they kill Iola Morton? Say it ain't so...
              >
              Indeed.

              With a car bomb, no less...

              Emily



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