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Re: [GAdetection] Re: 2001 Books

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  • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
    Nick- NOT that I d ever try to persuade you one way or another, but be warned that Upfield s VENOM HOUSE is not a very good representation of his work. I
    Message 1 of 23 , Jan 1, 2002
      Nick-  NOT that I'd ever try to persuade you one way or another, but be warned that Upfield's VENOM HOUSE is not a very good representation of his work.  I have about five left to read of his books and VENOM is about at the bottom of my favorites of his work.  It LOOKS good but it's dull ultimately.  And Boney is not very interesting in this story.
       
      Try DEATH OF A LAKE, MR. JELLY'S BUISNESS, THE BONE IS POINTED, THE MAN OF TWO TRIBES, THE MOUNTAINS HAVE A SECRET or THE SANDS OF WINDEE.  All of these are quite excellent and show Boney at his best. I would be really interested to read your comments on this writer.  I'm not all together sure that you are going to like him.  It's just a gut feeling I have...
       
      You mentioned teleplays of Carr's works.  I couldn't agree more.  And I never thought of Jim Broadbent as Dr. Fell but he would be perfect.  What I wouldn't give for an adequate adaptation of HAG'S NOOK or THE ARABIAN NIGHTS MURDERS or THE CROOKED HINGE.
       
      Happy New Year, Nick!  I hope that 2002 is prosperous for you!
       
      Richard
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Nicholas Fuller
      Sent: Monday, December 31, 2001 9:13 PM
      To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Re: 2001 Books
       

      I haven't read any Upfield, I'm afraid.  I know I ought to, but I haven't got round to reading any.  Have you read Venom House?

      I agree that the Poirot plots are sometimes oversimplified, which is why I hope and pray that Death on the Nile is filmed as a two parter.  Still, One, Two, Buckle My Shoe and Death in the Clouds have the distinctive Christiean feeling of clueing and detection; and The A.B.C. Murders, essentially a thriller with detection, has most of the book's plot, although Poirot's detection is over-simplified at the end--the deductions from the A.B.C. Guides themselves are lacking.  Although I can't read the books, I find that the Inspector Morse television series has plenty of detection.  Yet Poirot is far more entertaining, and less humdrum (although I love the opera elements in Morse).  The Miss Marples were two and a half hours long, so the makers were able to put in all the clues as well as adding new elements--A Caribbean Mystery, while weak as a book, works particularly well as a film because of this.  A balance needs to be struck.  John Dickson Carr, at his best, was a master at concealing clues in entertaining situations: e.g., The Blind Barber.  I wish a television series would be made of Carr's works--James Grout for H.M., Jim Broadbent for Dr. Fell.

      Regards,

      Nick Fuller



      'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).



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    • Nicholas Fuller
      Dear Richard, Thanks for the advice. I ll keep an eye out then for the others--I have heard Death of a Lake, The Bone is Pointed and The Sands of Windee are
      Message 2 of 23 , Jan 1, 2002

        Dear Richard,

        Thanks for the advice.  I'll keep an eye out then for the others--I have heard Death of a Lake, The Bone is Pointed and The Sands of Windee are especially good.

        Regards,

        Nick Fuller



        'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).



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      • wyattjames
        The New Shoe is half-caste Boney in a traditional setting (not Outback), and is quite good, but nothing to match with Death of a Lake, for example. But the
        Message 3 of 23 , Jan 1, 2002
          "The New Shoe" is half-caste Boney in a traditional setting (not
          Outback), and is quite good, but nothing to match with "Death of a
          Lake," for example. But the former does point out Boney's dual
          background in that he behaves like a "white man" here. That's why I
          wonder where Upfield got his anthropology from, since Inspector
          Bonaparte is a very schizoid character. Well-portrayed, but has there
          ever been anybody like this? The cultural magnetism that keeps
          driving him close to his aboriginal roots requires a constant effort
          of will to resist. Boney is a prototype classic detective (as was
          Holmes, Carrados, Thinking Machine, and others who had some
          definitive 'difference').

          Fascinating. The Outback books rank with Tony Hillerman as wonderful
          descriptions of by-cultural adaptation. It's a pity that Upfield's
          prose style was very pedestrian, although some of his settings are
          unforgetably rendered. Just the laid-back and protracted
          investigations give the impression of a timeless and eternally old,
          changeless, and indifferent landscape. Imagine the Moon with air on
          it and a very simplified ecosystem.

          --- In GAdetection@y..., "RICHARD LIEDHOLM" <jandrliedholm@m...>
          wrote:
          > Nick- NOT that I'd ever try to persuade you one way or another,
          but be warned that Upfield's VENOM HOUSE is not a very good
          representation of his work. I have about five left to read of his
          books and VENOM is about at the bottom of my favorites of his work.
          It LOOKS good but it's dull ultimately. And Boney is not very
          interesting in this story.
          >
          > Try DEATH OF A LAKE, MR. JELLY'S BUISNESS, THE BONE IS POINTED, THE
          MAN OF TWO TRIBES, THE MOUNTAINS HAVE A SECRET or THE SANDS OF
          WINDEE. All of these are quite excellent and show Boney at his best.
          I would be really interested to read your comments on this writer.
          I'm not all together sure that you are going to like him. It's just
          a gut feeling I have...
          >
          > You mentioned teleplays of Carr's works. I couldn't agree more.
          And I never thought of Jim Broadbent as Dr. Fell but he would be
          perfect. What I wouldn't give for an adequate adaptation of HAG'S
          NOOK or THE ARABIAN NIGHTS MURDERS or THE CROOKED HINGE.
          >
          > Happy New Year, Nick! I hope that 2002 is prosperous for you!
          >
          > Richard
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Nicholas Fuller
          > Sent: Monday, December 31, 2001 9:13 PM
          > To: GAdetection@y...
          > Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Re: 2001 Books
          >
          > I haven't read any Upfield, I'm afraid. I know I ought to, but I
          haven't got round to reading any. Have you read Venom House?
          > I agree that the Poirot plots are sometimes oversimplified, which
          is why I hope and pray that Death on the Nile is filmed as a two
          parter. Still, One, Two, Buckle My Shoe and Death in the Clouds have
          the distinctive Christiean feeling of clueing and detection; and The
          A.B.C. Murders, essentially a thriller with detection, has most of
          the book's plot, although Poirot's detection is over-simplified at
          the end--the deductions from the A.B.C. Guides themselves are
          lacking. Although I can't read the books, I find that the Inspector
          Morse television series has plenty of detection. Yet Poirot is far
          more entertaining, and less humdrum (although I love the opera
          elements in Morse). The Miss Marples were two and a half hours long,
          so the makers were able to put in all the clues as well as adding new
          elements--A Caribbean Mystery, while weak as a book, works
          particularly well as a film because of this. A balance needs to be
          struck. John Dickson Carr, at his best, was a master at concealing
          clues in entertaining situations: e.g., The Blind Barber. I wish a
          television series would be made of Carr's works--James Grout for
          H.M., Jim Broadbent for Dr. Fell.
          > Regards,
          > Nick Fuller
          >
          >
          > 'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially
          when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed
          page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).
          >
          >
          >
          >
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          > Get personalised at My Yahoo!.
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          > ADVERTISEMENT
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        • wyattjames
          PS. Who is Jim Broadbent (as Dr Fell), for heaven s sake? (See my message to Doug Greene.) These days I don t know the names of most actors except outstanding
          Message 4 of 23 , Jan 2, 2002
            PS. Who is Jim Broadbent (as Dr Fell), for heaven's sake? (See my
            message to Doug Greene.) These days I don't know the names of most
            actors except outstanding eccentric ones like Gary Oldman and Tim
            Roth. Apart from the beautiful Nicole Kidman, the actresses are all
            just a melange of euphonious names.

            --- In GAdetection@y..., "RICHARD LIEDHOLM" <jandrliedholm@m...>
            wrote:
            > Nick- NOT that I'd ever try to persuade you one way or another,
            but be warned that Upfield's VENOM HOUSE is not a very good
            representation of his work. I have about five left to read of his
            books and VENOM is about at the bottom of my favorites of his work.
            It LOOKS good but it's dull ultimately. And Boney is not very
            interesting in this story.
            >
            > Try DEATH OF A LAKE, MR. JELLY'S BUISNESS, THE BONE IS POINTED, THE
            MAN OF TWO TRIBES, THE MOUNTAINS HAVE A SECRET or THE SANDS OF
            WINDEE. All of these are quite excellent and show Boney at his best.
            I would be really interested to read your comments on this writer.
            I'm not all together sure that you are going to like him. It's just
            a gut feeling I have...
            >
            > You mentioned teleplays of Carr's works. I couldn't agree more.
            And I never thought of Jim Broadbent as Dr. Fell but he would be
            perfect. What I wouldn't give for an adequate adaptation of HAG'S
            NOOK or THE ARABIAN NIGHTS MURDERS or THE CROOKED HINGE.
            >
            > Happy New Year, Nick! I hope that 2002 is prosperous for you!
            >
            > Richard
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Nicholas Fuller
            > Sent: Monday, December 31, 2001 9:13 PM
            > To: GAdetection@y...
            > Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Re: 2001 Books
            >
            > I haven't read any Upfield, I'm afraid. I know I ought to, but I
            haven't got round to reading any. Have you read Venom House?
            > I agree that the Poirot plots are sometimes oversimplified, which
            is why I hope and pray that Death on the Nile is filmed as a two
            parter. Still, One, Two, Buckle My Shoe and Death in the Clouds have
            the distinctive Christiean feeling of clueing and detection; and The
            A.B.C. Murders, essentially a thriller with detection, has most of
            the book's plot, although Poirot's detection is over-simplified at
            the end--the deductions from the A.B.C. Guides themselves are
            lacking. Although I can't read the books, I find that the Inspector
            Morse television series has plenty of detection. Yet Poirot is far
            more entertaining, and less humdrum (although I love the opera
            elements in Morse). The Miss Marples were two and a half hours long,
            so the makers were able to put in all the clues as well as adding new
            elements--A Caribbean Mystery, while weak as a book, works
            particularly well as a film because of this. A balance needs to be
            struck. John Dickson Carr, at his best, was a master at concealing
            clues in entertaining situations: e.g., The Blind Barber. I wish a
            television series would be made of Carr's works--James Grout for
            H.M., Jim Broadbent for Dr. Fell.
            > Regards,
            > Nick Fuller
            >
            >
            > 'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially
            when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed
            page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Get personalised at My Yahoo!.
            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            > ADVERTISEMENT
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > GAdetection-unsubscribe@y...
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
            Wyatt- I respectfully direct you to the films TOPSY-TURVY and MOULIN ROUGE for a great glimpse of Jim Broadbent. I especially grew to love him in
            Message 5 of 23 , Jan 3, 2002
              Wyatt-  I respectfully direct you to the films TOPSY-TURVY and MOULIN ROUGE for a great glimpse of Jim Broadbent.  I especially grew to love him in TOPSY-TURVY.  ROUGE has many good points but the annoying directing style caused me to have an epileptic fit.  He's also in a new movie with Judi Densch, but I forgot the title. 
               
              He certainly has the look and the spirit of a Dr. Fell.  It would be as inspired a casting as Jeremy Brett.
               
              Richard  
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: wyattjames
              Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 2:08 AM
              To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [GAdetection] Re: 2001 Books
               
              PS. Who is Jim Broadbent (as Dr Fell), for heaven's sake? (See my
              message to Doug Greene.) These days I don't know the names of most
              actors except outstanding eccentric ones like Gary Oldman and Tim
              Roth. Apart from the beautiful Nicole Kidman, the actresses are all
              just a melange of euphonious names.

              --- In GAdetection@y..., "RICHARD LIEDHOLM" <jandrliedholm@m...>
              wrote:
              > Nick-  NOT that I'd ever try to persuade you one way or another,
              but be warned that Upfield's VENOM HOUSE is not a very good
              representation of his work.  I have about five left to read of his
              books and VENOM is about at the bottom of my favorites of his work.
              It LOOKS good but it's dull ultimately.  And Boney is not very
              interesting in this story.
              >
              > Try DEATH OF A LAKE, MR. JELLY'S BUISNESS, THE BONE IS POINTED, THE
              MAN OF TWO TRIBES, THE MOUNTAINS HAVE A SECRET or THE SANDS OF
              WINDEE.  All of these are quite excellent and show Boney at his best.
              I would be really interested to read your comments on this writer.
              I'm not all together sure that you are going to like him.  It's just
              a gut feeling I have...
              >
              > You mentioned teleplays of Carr's works.  I couldn't agree more.
              And I never thought of Jim Broadbent as Dr. Fell but he would be
              perfect.  What I wouldn't give for an adequate adaptation of HAG'S
              NOOK or THE ARABIAN NIGHTS MURDERS or THE CROOKED HINGE.
              >
              > Happy New Year, Nick!  I hope that 2002 is prosperous for you!
              >
              > Richard
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Nicholas Fuller
              > Sent: Monday, December 31, 2001 9:13 PM
              > To: GAdetection@y...
              > Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Re: 2001 Books
              >
              > I haven't read any Upfield, I'm afraid.  I know I ought to, but I
              haven't got round to reading any.  Have you read Venom House?
              > I agree that the Poirot plots are sometimes oversimplified, which
              is why I hope and pray that Death on the Nile is filmed as a two
              parter.  Still, One, Two, Buckle My Shoe and Death in the Clouds have
              the distinctive Christiean feeling of clueing and detection; and The
              A.B.C. Murders, essentially a thriller with detection, has most of
              the book's plot, although Poirot's detection is over-simplified at
              the end--the deductions from the A.B.C. Guides themselves are
              lacking.  Although I can't read the books, I find that the Inspector
              Morse television series has plenty of detection.  Yet Poirot is far
              more entertaining, and less humdrum (although I love the opera
              elements in Morse).  The Miss Marples were two and a half hours long,
              so the makers were able to put in all the clues as well as adding new
              elements--A Caribbean Mystery, while weak as a book, works
              particularly well as a film because of this.  A balance needs to be
              struck.  John Dickson Carr, at his best, was a master at concealing
              clues in entertaining situations: e.g., The Blind Barber.  I wish a
              television series would be made of Carr's works--James Grout for
              H.M., Jim Broadbent for Dr. Fell.
              > Regards,
              > Nick Fuller
              >
              >
              > 'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially
              when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed
              page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Do You Yahoo!?
              > Get personalised at My Yahoo!.
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              > ADVERTISEMENT
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > GAdetection-unsubscribe@y...
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              GAdetection-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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            • Jon Jermey
              Incidentally, they re just repeating a Bony series on daytime TV in Sydney - not the earlier one where Kate Fitzpatrick got her start, but the later one from
              Message 6 of 23 , Jan 4, 2002
                Incidentally, they're just repeating a Bony series on daytime TV in Sydney - not the earlier one where Kate Fitzpatrick got her start, but the later one from the 80's (?). In both series they rather missed the point by a) ignoring the original plots and b) having Bony played by a white actor with a touch of light tan boot polish. This is one series which is no loss to posterity.
                 
                Jon
              • mike5568
                Puzzle Of The Silver Persian, Stuart Palmer (1934) - Literally the book where Stuart Palmer matures as a writer. The Penguin Pool Murder,Murder On Wheels and
                Message 7 of 23 , May 9, 2003
                  Puzzle Of The Silver Persian, Stuart Palmer (1934) - Literally the
                  book where Stuart Palmer matures as a writer. The Penguin Pool
                  Murder,Murder On Wheels and Murder On The Blackboard were very good
                  books. They were breezy, entertaining and lightweight. The Silver
                  Persian gets more complex and with more meat on the bone while still
                  maintaining a certain humor in the proceedings. Miss Withers starts
                  this one off on a voyage for the first quarter or so of the book and
                  finishes in England. Good characterization and solid plot make this
                  one a 4 out of 5 (very good). Mr.Smith`s Hat, Helen Reilly (1936) -
                  My first reading of Mrs.Reilly and was interesting going for the
                  first third of the book. Good story, plot going back and forth
                  between the crime and the people concerned along with Insp. McKees
                  efforts to solve it. But about halfway through Mr. Smith`s Hat turns
                  out to be like a good soup with too many ingredients added to it.
                  While things smooth out toward the end and a satisfactory ending, it
                  just seems like a very good story told with more trimming than was
                  necessary. 3.5 out of 5. Harvard Has A Homicide, Timothy Fuller
                  (1936) - This is the first of the Edmund (Jupiter) Jones books
                  written by Fuller. In it, Jones, who is an undergraduate in Fine
                  Arts at Harvard comes off as an early Ellery Queen type crossed with
                  early Anthony Gethryn. Very intelligent, flippant and taking nothing
                  seriously. He discovers the body of his tutor murdered and becomes an
                  amateur sleuth. Actually getting along pretty well with the officer
                  assigned to the case who is not portrayed as dummy but a pretty smart
                  guy himself. Lots of witty dialouge, lots of typical stereotyping of
                  the times and lots of drinking, a whole lot. Good solid first effort
                  that rates a 4 out of 5.
                • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
                  Mike- Thanks for your reviews. I have The Puzzle of the Silver Persian somewhere buried in my bookshelves and I ll need to dig it out and give it a spin. And
                  Message 8 of 23 , May 9, 2003
                    Mike- Thanks for your reviews. I have The Puzzle of the Silver Persian somewhere buried in my bookshelves and I'll need to dig it out and give it a spin.

                    And Bob- thanks for your kind comments. I deleted your e-mail by accident-I meant to hit the response button. As you know, I love your Nero Wolfe reviews and look forward to more or them. I hope you start discussing the novels soon. I would welcome your comments on such books as The Red Box, The Second Confession and If Death Ever Slept.

                    Richard

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: mike5568
                    Sent: Friday, May 09, 2003 3:33 PM
                    To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [GAdetection] Capsule Reviews

                    Puzzle Of The Silver Persian, Stuart Palmer (1934) - Literally the
                    book where Stuart Palmer matures as a writer. The Penguin Pool
                    Murder,Murder On Wheels and Murder On The Blackboard were very good
                    books. They were breezy, entertaining and lightweight. The Silver
                    Persian gets more complex and with more meat on the bone while still
                    maintaining a certain humor in the proceedings. Miss Withers starts
                    this one off on a voyage for the first quarter or so of the book and
                    finishes in England. Good characterization and solid plot make this
                    one a 4 out of 5 (very good). Mr.Smith`s Hat, Helen Reilly (1936) -
                    My first reading of Mrs.Reilly and was interesting going for the
                    first third of the book. Good story, plot going back and forth
                    between the crime and the people concerned along with Insp. McKees
                    efforts to solve it. But about halfway through Mr. Smith`s Hat turns
                    out to be like a good soup with too many ingredients added to it.
                    While things smooth out toward the end and a satisfactory ending, it
                    just seems like a very good story told with more trimming than was
                    necessary. 3.5 out of 5. Harvard Has A Homicide, Timothy Fuller
                    (1936) - This is the first of the Edmund (Jupiter) Jones books
                    written by Fuller. In it, Jones, who is an undergraduate in Fine
                    Arts at Harvard comes off as an early Ellery Queen type crossed with
                    early Anthony Gethryn. Very intelligent, flippant and taking nothing
                    seriously. He discovers the body of his tutor murdered and becomes an
                    amateur sleuth. Actually getting along pretty well with the officer
                    assigned to the case who is not portrayed as dummy but a pretty smart
                    guy himself. Lots of witty dialouge, lots of typical stereotyping of
                    the times and lots of drinking, a whole lot. Good solid first effort
                    that rates a 4 out of 5.



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