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Wilkie Collins

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  • Wyatt James
    His beard is worse than mine when I haven t trimmed it for six months.
    Message 1 of 14 , Sep 12, 2004
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      His beard is worse than mine when I haven't trimmed it for six months.
    • Wyatt James
      This is a controversial comment to bring up now, with the case going on about the vegetative woman having her feeding tubes removed (even getting the courts
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 27, 2005
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        This is a controversial comment to bring up now, with the case going
        on about the 'vegetative' woman having her feeding tubes removed (even
        getting the courts and the politicians and the Vatican involved). But
        it is interesting.

        Collins's mystery/ghost-story novella "The Haunted Hotel" (1878)
        contains the first presentation of 'brain-dead' that I know of: "Is
        she likely to die?" "She is dead ... of a rupture of a blood-vessel on
        the brain. Those sounds [stertorous breathing, etc.] you hear are
        purely mechanical -- they may go on for hours."

        How does one define death? Descartes said "I think therefore I am" --
        if you can no longer think, you must be dead (no slurs intended on
        George Bush or the late Ronald Reagan). The traditional definition of
        death depends on the heart stopping to beat, yet it is commonplace
        these days for people to live on after their heart has stopped beating
        for any short length of time.

        Sorry if this is off-topic.
      • Rolf Richberg
        The times have been, That, when the brains were out, the man would die. (Macbeth, Act III)
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 28, 2005
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          The times have been,
          That, when the brains were out,
          the man would die. (Macbeth, Act III)
        • Carola
          Has anyone read any Wilkie Collins other than The Moonstone and The Woman in White? Are they worth the trouble of downloading? Happy New Year to all, Carola
          Message 4 of 14 , Dec 31, 2012
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            Has anyone read any Wilkie Collins other than The Moonstone and The Woman in White? Are they worth the trouble of downloading?

            Happy New Year to all,
            Carola
            <http://CarolaDunn.Weebly.com> & Facebook
            GONE WEST-20th Daisy Dalrymple mystery-England 1920s
            tHE VALLEY OF THE SHADOW-3rd Cornish Mystery
            Regencies galore, all now in e-books
          • Les
            Must admit I haven t read a lot of him yet beyond Moonstone and WIW...but I see where Amazon has an illustrated Kindle volume of ALL of Collins s work for
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 1, 2013
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              Must admit I haven't read a lot of him yet beyond Moonstone and WIW...but I see where Amazon has an illustrated Kindle volume of ALL of Collins's work for $2.99. Or, for just .99, you can get the "Greatest Mystery Collection, Volume 2," which has a few dozen Collins novels and short stories (along with Anna Katherine Green, very early Earl Derr Biggers (not Charlie Chan) and others.

              --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Carola" <caroladunn@...> wrote:
              >
              > Has anyone read any Wilkie Collins other than The Moonstone and The Woman in White? Are they worth the trouble of downloading?
              >
              > Happy New Year to all,
              > Carola
              > <http://CarolaDunn.Weebly.com> & Facebook
              > GONE WEST-20th Daisy Dalrymple mystery-England 1920s
              > tHE VALLEY OF THE SHADOW-3rd Cornish Mystery
              > Regencies galore, all now in e-books
              >
            • nzkpzq
              The Haunted Hotel (1878) is a pleasant novel. The Haunted Hotel is more of a detective story than a ghost story, despite its title. The ghostly manifestations
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 1, 2013
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                The Haunted Hotel (1878) is a pleasant novel.
                The Haunted Hotel is more of a detective story than a ghost story, despite its title. The ghostly manifestations are relatively few in number, and pretty short lived. They are mainly concerned with providing clues to the murder, clues which another author (or Collins himself in a different work) could easily have provided through pure detective work. Formally, the work adheres very closely to the canons of detective fiction.

                Even better is a long short story (or novella) "A Plot in Private Life" (1858). Collins wrote this while he was warming up for The Woman in White.

                Mike Grost
              • Allan Griffith
                ... I ll second the recommendation for THE HAUNTED HOTEL. A very enjoyable novel. Al
                Message 7 of 14 , Jan 2, 2013
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                  On 2 January 2013 20:05, <GAdetection@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                  > Posted by: "nzkpzq" mike@... nzkpzq
                  > Date: Tue Jan 1, 2013 7:51 am ((PST))
                  >
                  > The Haunted Hotel (1878) is a pleasant novel.
                  > The Haunted Hotel is more of a detective story than a ghost story, despite its title. The ghostly manifestations are relatively few in number, and pretty short lived. They are mainly concerned with providing clues to the murder, clues which another author (or Collins himself in a different work) could easily have provided through pure detective work. Formally, the work adheres very closely to the canons of detective fiction.

                  I'll second the recommendation for THE HAUNTED HOTEL. A very enjoyable novel.

                  Al
                • Douglas G.
                  Collins short stories are generally good, and they have considerable interest to fans of early detective fiction: After Dark. 1856. Mixed collection
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jan 3, 2013
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                    Collins' short stories are generally good, and they have considerable interest to fans of early detective fiction:

                    After Dark. 1856.
                    Mixed collection including 2 detective stories as well as the classic "A Terribly Strange Bed."


                    The Queen of Hearts. 1859.
                    Mixed collection of related stories, including one detective tale, "The Biter Bit. QQ 3; DSS p. 27; MR 207.

                    Little Novels. 1887.
                    Mixed collection including one detective story (“Mr. Policeman and the Cook”). According to Julian Thompson (in Wilkie Collins, The Complete Shorter Fiction, 1995), the detective story was commissioned by the American dime-novel publisher, George Munro, and appeared under the title "Who Killed Zebedee?" in 1881 (Seaside Library 928).

                    Julian Thompson's anthology is clearly the one to get.

                    DG


                    --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Allan Griffith wrote:
                    >
                    > On 2 January 2013 20:05, wrote:
                    > > Posted by: "nzkpzq" mike@... nzkpzq
                    > > Date: Tue Jan 1, 2013 7:51 am ((PST))
                    > >
                    > > The Haunted Hotel (1878) is a pleasant novel.
                    > > The Haunted Hotel is more of a detective story than a ghost story, despite its title. The ghostly manifestations are relatively few in number, and pretty short lived. They are mainly concerned with providing clues to the murder, clues which another author (or Collins himself in a different work) could easily have provided through pure detective work. Formally, the work adheres very closely to the canons of detective fiction.
                    >
                    > I'll second the recommendation for THE HAUNTED HOTEL. A very enjoyable novel.
                    >
                    > Al
                    >
                  • Carola
                    Thanks to everyone for your suggestions. Carola & Facebook GONE WEST-20th Daisy Dalrymple mystery-England 1920s tHE VALLEY OF
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jan 4, 2013
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                      Thanks to everyone for your suggestions.

                      Carola
                      <http://CarolaDunn.Weebly.com> & Facebook
                      GONE WEST-20th Daisy Dalrymple mystery-England 1920s
                      tHE VALLEY OF THE SHADOW-3rd Cornish Mystery
                      Regencies galore, all now in e-books
                    • goldenage_44
                      Hi, A bit off topic I know but, I recently bought some Wilkie Collins books, and noticed that one of them, The Moonstone according to the info on the back
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 25, 2013
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                        Hi,

                        A bit off topic I know but, I recently bought some Wilkie Collins books, and noticed that one of them, "The Moonstone" according to the info on the back has a impossible crime part to it, and I was curious if anyone can enlighten me, thanks.



                        Allen.
                      • Christine
                        If you are asking what I think you are asking, it just refers to the fact that on the surface, it appears that the crime was not possible to commit.  It may
                        Message 11 of 14 , Sep 25, 2013
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                          If you are asking what I think you are asking, it just refers to the fact that on the surface, it appears that the crime was not possible to commit.  It may be that everyone has an alibi, or it may have been a locked room incident..whatever the situation,  it couldn't have happened, but it did.

                          I've read The Moonstone several times, and I love it!  I love the telling of story from different people's narratives, I loved the impossible crime aspect...if you keep in mind that it was written in the 1860's, the plotting devices and the ingenious execution of the crime mentioned will blow your mind...well, it did mine anyway!

                          Enjoy!

                           
                           
                          Christine Brannen
                           
                          pinkpolarbear on Ravelry
                           
                          Friends help you move.  Real friends help you move bodies.
                        • Allan Griffith
                          ... THE WOMAN IN WHITE is good as well. Actually all of Wilkie Collins stuff is worth reading. THE HAUNTED HOTEL is a great blending of the gothic with the
                          Message 12 of 14 , Sep 26, 2013
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                            On 25 September 2013 23:11, Christine <murdermostbritish@...> wrote:



                            I've read The Moonstone several times, and I love it!  I love the telling of story from different people's narratives, I loved the impossible crime aspect...if you keep in mind that it was written in the 1860's, the plotting devices and the ingenious execution of the crime mentioned will blow your mind...well, it did mine anyway!

                            Enjoy!

                            THE WOMAN IN WHITE is good as well. Actually all of Wilkie Collins' stuff is worth reading. THE HAUNTED HOTEL is a great blending of the gothic with the Victorian sensation novel.

                            Al
                          • Allen Askew
                            Christine, Thanks for that, I was not aware of the impossible crime element of the story when I bought the book, glad you enjoyed it. Best, Allen.
                            Message 13 of 14 , Sep 27, 2013
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                              Christine,
                              Thanks for that, I was not aware of the impossible crime element of the story when I bought the book, glad you enjoyed it.



                              Best,
                              Allen.


                              From: Christine <murdermostbritish@...>
                              To: "GAdetection@yahoogroups.com" <GAdetection@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Wednesday, 25 September 2013, 14:11
                              Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Wilkie Collins

                               

                              If you are asking what I think you are asking, it just refers to the fact that on the surface, it appears that the crime was not possible to commit.  It may be that everyone has an alibi, or it may have been a locked room incident..whatever the situation,  it couldn't have happened, but it did.

                              I've read The Moonstone several times, and I love it!  I love the telling of story from different people's narratives, I loved the impossible crime aspect...if you keep in mind that it was written in the 1860's, the plotting devices and the ingenious execution of the crime mentioned will blow your mind...well, it did mine anyway!

                              Enjoy!

                               
                               
                              Christine Brannen
                               
                              pinkpolarbear on Ravelry
                               
                              Friends help you move.  Real friends help you move bodies.


                            • Allen Askew
                              Allan, Thanks, I did also buy The Woman In White and The Haunted Hotel to read, so I shall look forward to reading them some time in the future. Best, Allen.
                              Message 14 of 14 , Sep 27, 2013
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                                Allan,
                                Thanks, I did also buy The Woman In White and The Haunted Hotel to read, so I shall look forward to reading them some time in the future.



                                Best,
                                Allen.


                                From: Allan Griffith <dfordoom@...>
                                To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Thursday, 26 September 2013, 9:47
                                Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Wilkie Collins

                                 
                                On 25 September 2013 23:11, Christine <murdermostbritish@...> wrote:



                                I've read The Moonstone several times, and I love it!  I love the telling of story from different people's narratives, I loved the impossible crime aspect...if you keep in mind that it was written in the 1860's, the plotting devices and the ingenious execution of the crime mentioned will blow your mind...well, it did mine anyway!

                                Enjoy!

                                THE WOMAN IN WHITE is good as well. Actually all of Wilkie Collins' stuff is worth reading. THE HAUNTED HOTEL is a great blending of the gothic with the Victorian sensation novel.

                                Al


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