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Re: [GAdetection] Re: John Pritchard Jackson - hang on, there's more!

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  • aria376
    I too did my share of hounding, friend Zero, as Barry can attest, quite earlier in these events. However, I make no apology, conditional or otherwise. ;
    Message 1 of 21 , Jul 2, 2004
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      I too did my share of hounding, friend Zero, as Barry can attest, quite earlier in these
      events. However, I make no apology, conditional or otherwise.
      ;
      rkazero <rkazero@...> wrote:
      To bring you all up to date on what is happening in another forum, in
      case RVJ doesn't come here to explain:
      =======================================
      =======================================
      --- in The Golden Age Mysteries Forum "General" RVJ said:

      The William Wallace Press was kind of a book-club aimed to a Scottish
      independantist/traditionalist audience. Books were available in
      sympathizing stores and libraries, but most of the sales were made
      through mail. This some underground statute is the main reason for
      Pritchard's and its publisher's obscurity.

      --- in The Golden Age Mysteries Forum "General" Dave said:

      I can't find any of these books thorugh my usual sources. I don't
      believe they exist. Ritzner, what point are you trying to make?

      --- in The Golden Age Mysteries Forum "General" RVJ said:

      None, but it seems no one wants to believe me, so I'd better leaving
      and never coming back. I already unsuscribed from GAdetection, I now
      unsubscribe from this forum. Goodbye, all.
      =======================================
      =======================================

      Well, what can I say? The mail-order book-club story is certainly
      plausible, even obvious, as the explanation of the previous RVJ
      postings. The historians among you may know whether such things could
      have existed in the 30's in Scotland.

      Whether Pritchard Jackson really existed, and was "one of the most
      under-rated of GA authors", wrote "fine novels", and deserved a wide
      and huge appreciation, we may never know because of my leadership in
      the vile, mean-spirited, cynical and unfair hounding of this
      sensitive soul out of the group. And for that possibility I
      conditionally apologize.

      I think he will be back.
      RKAzero
















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    • b_ergang
      ... A number of us zinged him, it s true, and I took a cheap shot several days ago in the course of my shameless self-promotion--which I later apologized
      Message 2 of 21 , Jul 2, 2004
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        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, aria376 <aria376@y...> wrote:
        > I too did my share of hounding, friend Zero, as Barry can attest,
        > quite earlier in these events. However, I make no apology,
        > conditional or otherwise.

        A number of us zinged him, it's true, and I took a cheap shot
        several days ago in the course of my shameless self-promotion--which
        I later apologized for--but I can't recall any of us "hounding" him
        to leave either GAD or GAM. He threatened to do so, and several of
        us told him that was his decision to make but we weren't encouraging
        it.

        Most of us tried--sometimes diplomatically, sometimes not--to urge
        him to explain his positions and opinions, not just make
        pronouncements and assertions without foundation. As I tried several
        times to politely explain to him, we can all accept dissenting
        opinions about books and authors. (If we all agreed with one another
        all the time, forums like this and GAM would be indescribably dull.)
        What we all had a problem with was his acerbic manner and his
        arrogant I'll-brook-no-arguments way of voicing his views.

        I tried repeatedly, and for the most part civilly, to urge him to
        cut out the godlike pretentiousness by backing up his contentions
        with examples and explanations. A few times he did, but then
        reverted to type. E.g., at GAM, in a thread about Edmund Crispin, he
        wrote without qualification, "Crispin was a hack!!" This occurred
        *after* my several urgings and the urgings of others, including
        Wyatt and Aria. It annoyed me and I dropped civility when I
        replied, "The biggest 'hacks' are the ones who make unsubstantiated
        pronunciamentos like the one above."

        It's hard to imagine someone like Ritzner functioning in the "real"
        world, out among other people, if he expects them always to agree
        with him or consider him the last word on a given topic. Despite the
        irritation it provokes, you have to feel sorry for him.

        Richard, I don't think your amateur psychologizing is off the mark.
        I'd add to it that Ritzner is obviously an intelligent person, but
        one whose insecurity drives him to call attention to himself in
        negative ways to perpetuate a streak of martyrdom. E.g., the John
        Pritchard Jackson business. Jackson may truly have been the GA
        writer Ritzner claims, but Ritzner admits to having "spiced" his
        claims for the man's genius by attributing fabricated acclamations
        from major mystery writers. This does nothing to enhance Ritzner's
        personal credibility, and he has to have known that on *some* level.
        But it *does* call attention to him as the "discoverer" of
        a "neglected" author. When he's challenged by others for additional,
        verifiable information, he drapes himself in martyr's clothing and
        bails out of the group, sadly misunderstood and disbelieved.

        In other words, he sets himself up for rejection so he can savor his
        self-image: the savant in a world of philistines, the tragic but
        heroic intellectual waging a losing battle against the "great
        unwashed."

        If you're lurking, Ritzner, I wish you a belated happy birthday,
        good fortune, and self-awareness. Speaking only for myself, you're
        more than welcome to rejoin us and voice your opinions. I'd ask only
        that you cite the reasons for them.

        This is all entirely off-topic. It's time to get back to discussing
        mysteries rather than personalities. I'll start--but in a separate
        post.

        Best,
        Barry
      • Wyatt James
        As Xavier so well puts it, this is a Golden Age mystery writer who deserves to be remembered, even if we have to invent him. Paranoid/schizo (perhaps that s
        Message 3 of 21 , Jul 3, 2004
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          As Xavier so well puts it, this is a Golden Age mystery writer who
          deserves to be remembered, even if we have to invent him.
          Paranoid/schizo (perhaps that's too cruel a term) Ritzner discovered
          him for us, so we owe him the respect to expand upon the theme.

          Let us say that JPJ was born in Chislehurst, Kent, in 1900, went to
          the Cooper's Union School in East London, worked as a newspaper
          reporter (craft fairs and labor union rallies and the like) on Fleet
          Street for most of his early life, then at the age of 26 went off to
          Glasgow to rediscover his Scottish roots and support the nationalist
          cause. The Nats needed money, so he wrote some detective stories,
          which have become underground classics even if they never sold more
          than a couple of hundred copies each. They are noted for complex plots
          of the 'impossible crime' variety, well-clued, but set in the 'mean
          streets' of Sauchiekill amongst a class of folk not written about in
          bourgeois detective fiction of the time -- no lairds, no gillies
          managing deer and grouse and salmon in the Highlands, none of that.
          His detective, however, Angus Arbuthnot, Esq., was a quintessential
          Scottish law clerk, later an advocate, who was noted for his
          scriptural quotations and his addiction to snuff. ....
          JPJ died in 1942 when a misguided German bomb fell on his taxi-cab while
          he was on his way back to his hotel in London from a pub-crawl; he was
          working at that time as a secret agent investigating the inroads of
          German intelligence operatives into the Celtic nationalist movements
          of the time, his opinion being that the Krauts were worse masters than
          the Limies.

          --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Xavier Lechard" <x.lechard@f...>
          wrote:
          > Whoever he was and whether he existed or not, we have to admit
          "John
          > Pritchard Jackson" had a flair for tempting titles:
          >
          > > - The Cross Street Mystery (1929)
          > > - Red As Death (1930)
          > > - We Who Shall Die (1931)
          > > - Back From Oblivion (1932)
          > > - The Season of the Witch (1933)
          > > - The House of Evil (1934)
          > > - The French Affair (1935)
          > > - Missing From His Home (1936)
          > > - The Messenger of Death (1937)
          > > - The Dilettante Hangman (1938)
          > > - The Nameless Thing (1939)
          > > - The Man From The Rhine (1940)
          > > - Second Thoughts (1941)
          >
          > If these books don't exist, then they should. Someone willing to
          > write them? ;-)
          >
          > Friendly,
          > Xavier
        • rkazero
          An admirable effort, Wyatt, but clearly fictitious. In GAM, Von Jung informed us that the real JPJ lived from 1899 to 1997. Check your sources, laddie! I
          Message 4 of 21 , Jul 3, 2004
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            An admirable effort, Wyatt, but clearly fictitious. In GAM, Von Jung
            informed us that the real JPJ lived from 1899 to 1997. Check your
            sources, laddie!

            I wonder what JPJ was doing for that last 50-odd years of his life.
            Probably couldn't find another publisher after the demise of the
            William Wallace Press, given the subversive nature of his writing.

            It reminds me of Mildred Davis (everything does). People have asked
            me why she stopped writing (as if I would know). As we now know,
            thanks to my brilliant research (I asked her), she didn't. She just
            stopped writing publishable novels. I wonder how much this was due
            to a decline in her powers as a writer, and how much because
            publishers thought her style of writing would not sell well any more.

            I am currently investigating the possibility, using computerized
            textual analysis, that John Pritchard Jackson moved to the U.S. after
            WW2, and wrote the Mildred Davis stories under this nom de plume,
            giving the credit to an obscure Westchester housewife in order to
            hide his identity. Stay tuned. (Ritzner lent me the JPJ books for the
            analysis.)
            RKAzero
          • Xavier Lechard
            ... Jung ... What have Harper Lee or J.D. Salinger been doing for the last fifty years? Maybe JPJ had said everything he had to say, or he lost inspiration, or
            Message 5 of 21 , Jul 3, 2004
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              --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "rkazero" <rkazero@f...> wrote:
              > An admirable effort, Wyatt, but clearly fictitious. In GAM, Von
              Jung
              > informed us that the real JPJ lived from 1899 to 1997. Check your
              > sources, laddie!
              >
              > I wonder what JPJ was doing for that last 50-odd years of his life.

              What have Harper Lee or J.D. Salinger been doing for the last fifty
              years? Maybe JPJ had said everything he had to say, or he lost
              inspiration, or simply got a life.

              Friendly,
              Xavier
            • Wyatt James
              JPJ was born on New Year s Eve 1899 according to the registry, but claimed in a preface that he was a child of the new century. Ritzner could be right about
              Message 6 of 21 , Jul 3, 2004
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                JPJ was born on New Year's Eve 1899 according to the registry, but
                claimed in a preface that he was a child of the new century. Ritzner
                could be right about his death date, but a body with his ID was found
                in the bombed taxi -- perhaps he went under cover? In any case he
                wrote no more books under his own name.

                --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "rkazero" <rkazero@f...> wrote:
                > An admirable effort, Wyatt, but clearly fictitious. In GAM, Von Jung
                > informed us that the real JPJ lived from 1899 to 1997. Check your
                > sources, laddie!
                >
                > I wonder what JPJ was doing for that last 50-odd years of his life.
                > Probably couldn't find another publisher after the demise of the
                > William Wallace Press, given the subversive nature of his writing.
                >
                > It reminds me of Mildred Davis (everything does). People have asked
                > me why she stopped writing (as if I would know). As we now know,
                > thanks to my brilliant research (I asked her), she didn't. She just
                > stopped writing publishable novels. I wonder how much this was due
                > to a decline in her powers as a writer, and how much because
                > publishers thought her style of writing would not sell well any more.
                >
                > I am currently investigating the possibility, using computerized
                > textual analysis, that John Pritchard Jackson moved to the U.S. after
                > WW2, and wrote the Mildred Davis stories under this nom de plume,
                > giving the credit to an obscure Westchester housewife in order to
                > hide his identity. Stay tuned. (Ritzner lent me the JPJ books for the
                > analysis.)
                > RKAzero
              • rkazero
                ... found ... Exactly! And that brings us to the serious thesis I put forward, that he emigrated to the States and wrote the Mildred Davis books. Just
                Message 7 of 21 , Jul 3, 2004
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                  --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Wyatt James" <grobius@s...>
                  wrote:
                  > JPJ was born on New Year's Eve 1899 according to the registry, but
                  > claimed in a preface that he was a child of the new century. Ritzner
                  > could be right about his death date, but a body with his ID was
                  found
                  > in the bombed taxi -- perhaps he went under cover? In any case he
                  > wrote no more books under his own name.

                  Exactly! And that brings us to the serious thesis I put forward, that
                  he emigrated to the States and wrote the Mildred Davis books. Just
                  consider!
                  1. JPJ and MD each published exactly 13 novels (if we count Suicide
                  Hour). Coincidence? I don't think so.
                  2. If we subtract the publ. year of MD's first novel from that of the
                  last, we get 29!! JPJ's first novel was published in '29.
                  Coincidence? I don't think so.
                  3. If we look at the collection of words in the combined titles of
                  each author we find these remarkable facts:
                  (a) each has four words starting with 'S'.
                  (b) if we eliminate initial articles, each has two embedded articles.
                  Coincidence? Don't fool yourself!
                  4. There is an obvious forward looking reference to MD in the JPJ
                  title "Messenger of Death".
                  5. And just look at the correlation of the titles "STRange CORner"
                  and "The CROss STReet Mystery".
                  Case Closed.
                  RKAzero (nobody can say I'm just a pretty face)
                • Wyatt James
                  You have proved your case by sheer deduction -- brilliant. Howwever, there isn t a shred of proof.
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jul 3, 2004
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                    You have proved your case by sheer deduction -- brilliant. Howwever,
                    there isn't a shred of proof.

                    --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "rkazero" <rkazero@f...> wrote:
                    > --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Wyatt James" <grobius@s...>
                    > wrote:
                    > > JPJ was born on New Year's Eve 1899 according to the registry, but
                    > > claimed in a preface that he was a child of the new century. Ritzner
                    > > could be right about his death date, but a body with his ID was
                    > found
                    > > in the bombed taxi -- perhaps he went under cover? In any case he
                    > > wrote no more books under his own name.
                    >
                    > Exactly! And that brings us to the serious thesis I put forward, that
                    > he emigrated to the States and wrote the Mildred Davis books. Just
                    > consider!
                    > 1. JPJ and MD each published exactly 13 novels (if we count Suicide
                    > Hour). Coincidence? I don't think so.
                    > 2. If we subtract the publ. year of MD's first novel from that of the
                    > last, we get 29!! JPJ's first novel was published in '29.
                    > Coincidence? I don't think so.
                    > 3. If we look at the collection of words in the combined titles of
                    > each author we find these remarkable facts:
                    > (a) each has four words starting with 'S'.
                    > (b) if we eliminate initial articles, each has two embedded articles.
                    > Coincidence? Don't fool yourself!
                    > 4. There is an obvious forward looking reference to MD in the JPJ
                    > title "Messenger of Death".
                    > 5. And just look at the correlation of the titles "STRange CORner"
                    > and "The CROss STReet Mystery".
                    > Case Closed.
                    > RKAzero (nobody can say I'm just a pretty face)
                  • rkazero
                    ... Ah, but you are forgetting the computerized textual analysis which will prove beyond the shadow of a statistical doubt that the 26 novels were written by
                    Message 9 of 21 , Jul 4, 2004
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                      --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Wyatt James" <grobius@s...>
                      wrote:
                      > You have proved your case by sheer deduction -- brilliant. Howwever,
                      > there isn't a shred of proof.

                      Ah, but you are forgetting the computerized textual analysis which
                      will prove beyond the shadow of a statistical doubt that the 26
                      novels were written by the same author. RKAzero
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