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Re: [GAdetection] Connington and Cole

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  • Nicholas Fuller
    Dear Anita, You don t seem to have had much luck of late. While I would hardly call Two Tickets one of Connington s best (the murderer is obvious from very
    Message 1 of 23 , Jun 30, 2004
      Dear Anita,

      You don't seem to have had much luck of late.

      While I would hardly call Two Tickets one of Connington's best (the murderer is obvious from very early on, the characters are rather flat, and there's none of the wit of the Driffield novels), I do think you rather overstate the case. It's not completely unreadable, and I can think of a few worse Conningtons--e.g., Common Sense is All You Need, his last book, which reads well enough, but makes the mistake of treating the reader as an idiot. Of course, Sayers greatly improved on the idea in The Five Red Herrings.

      The only positive review I've ever read of Munitions was Barzun's in COC. Nearly every contemporary review was profoundly negative; and modern critics are almost unanimous in calling it one of their worst. Those of you who haven't read any of the Coles' works shouldn't be put off by this. They wrote several classic works, particularly in the 1920s: e.g., The Death of a Millionaire, The Murder at Crome House, The Man from the River, Poison in a Garden Suburb and Dead Man's Watch. Avoid the Pendexter Saga and Greek Tragedy.

      Nick


      'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).


      ---------------------------------
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ritzner Von Jung
      ... Which is telling a lot. Ritzner Von Jung
      Message 2 of 23 , Jul 1, 2004
        Nicholas Fuller wrote:

        >The only positive review I've ever read of Munitions was >Barzun's in COC.

        Which is telling a lot.

        Ritzner Von Jung
      • agh7746
        Hi Nick: Good to hear from you. Before we get down to GA business, are you now finished with school? What s next for you? And before I leave the personal note,
        Message 3 of 23 , Jul 1, 2004
          Hi Nick:

          Good to hear from you. Before we get down to GA business, are you now finished with school? What's next for you? And before I leave the personal note, I did see your updates, and they are appreciated. I know they must be incredibly time consuming, so I don't like to ask people to do updates (although I once did with Christian). The only thing you have to do, and I know I am being pushy, is update the photos of you. We want to see how you've grown over the years.

          Maybe you're right about Two Tickets. But the killer was so very obvious that everything went downhill from there. I don't have, and probably now won't look for, Common Sense. Thanks for the heads-up on that title.

          I knew I couldn't be the only one who thought Munitions was awful. Just checked Barzun and saw the review. They must have read an earlier draft than the final published copy. Sure wasn't the same book I am in the middle of. And speaking of being in the middle of, I just can't devote anymore time to this title. There are too many good books on my shelves that need to be reading.

          I recently acquired a copy of Night's Cloak by another favorite of mine, E. R. Punshon, featuring Inspector Bobby Owens. It has a reputation of being a true detective story, which I know I will enjoy.

          As for the other Cole titles you mentioned, I've read Death of a Millionaire and Murder at Crome House, both of which I totally enjoyed. The others I do not have. One bad Cole you didn't mention is Dr. Tancred Begins, a totally horrible read. And I finished last month The Blatchington Tangle, which I did enjoy. Supt. Wilson is no longer at Scotland Yard, and does the unimaginable at the end.... something I can't reveal as it is a spoiler in the strictest sense of the word.

          Again, good to hear from you,

          Anita



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Nicholas Fuller
          Last night I attended an amateur performance of Christie s And Then There Were None (Tempo Theatre, Belconnen). Although some of the performances were rather
          Message 4 of 23 , Jul 2, 2004
            Last night I attended an amateur performance of Christie's And Then There Were None (Tempo Theatre, Belconnen). Although some of the performances were rather ropy (Vera Claythorne spoke her lines as though reading them off a cue-card and Dr. Armstrong was rather wooden), most of the cast was very good indeed. General Mackenzie did a very good portrayal of senility; Miss Brent's fits of religious fervour were genuinely disturbing at times; and Blore, Captain Lombard and Mrs. Rogers were all excellent.

            What really struck me, though, was the importance of playing it straight. Christie knew what she was doing when she wrote it as a black drawing-room comedy. There is a great deal of humour, e.g. Marston's lines about "jolly bad luck" to have run over a couple of children, even the growing suspicion in the second act is not without its humorous side (the lines about the biscuits, for example). Christie knows that we need humour both to relieve and to increase the tension--after all, films which go in for blood and guts without a pause tend to become increasingly farcical.

            The more recent films (I haven't seen the 1940s version) have both been dreadful. The Baghdad hotel and African safari settings were both so outlandish that it was difficult to believe in the multiple murders by nursery rhyme. To make the play work, to make it believable, it needs to be grounded in reality: a fairly normal setting: a brand-new mansion on an island, the sort of place where fashionable house parties would be held. Because we are used to seeing Lord Edgware stabbed to death in his mansion, Rex Fortescue poisoned in his and Lady Tressilian battered to death in hers, we are more likely to accept that ten people would be killed than if they were stranded in a balloon flying over the Andes.

            Another thing which I noticed was how excellent Christie's pacing was. She has the gift of knowing what to do, when--at the exact moment. The play begins very slowly, as the characters are introduced to each other and to the audience, and then begins to gather pace with the three murders committed in the first act. By the end of the second act, events have begun to move so quickly that they nearly get out of control--but only nearly, never quite.

            All in all, a very agreeable evening.

            Nick


            'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).


            ---------------------------------
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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Nicholas Fuller
            Australia is fortunate enough to have the four new episodes of Poirot broadcast on ABC on Sunday nights, beginning with Death on the Nile. This is easily the
            Message 5 of 23 , Jul 4, 2004
              Australia is fortunate enough to have the four new episodes of Poirot broadcast on ABC on Sunday nights, beginning with Death on the Nile. This is easily the best Poirot for several years, and the mosto faithful adaptation of any novel since Peril at End House, fourteen years ago. It was quite sensible to have a new executive producer, new script-writers and directors. Where the programme had been feeling rather stale and formulaic (too much emphasis on humour and gimmickry), it's now a much fresher programme. Suchet has dropped his mannerisms and is playing it straight: an older, wiser and sadder Poirot, who has realised that he is getting old and has missed the good things of life (romance, a family, etc.), and who is more understanding of the criminals' motives. The programme has become more serious drama, with equal emphasis placed on both character and detection. The cast was excellent, including Barbara Flynn, Emma Malin (both of whom appeared in the recent version of the
              The Forsyte Saga, directed by Andy Wilson, who also directed this) and Frances de la Tour; and the film was faithful to the book in almost every detail. Almost every detail: three minor characters (Fanthorp, Miss Bowers and Ricchetti) were dropped, and Tim Allerton became a homosexual. These didn't offend in the way extraneous sub-plots did in earlier films (e.g. the drug business in Murder in Mesopotamia and Evil under the Sun), and Rosalie's love for Tim (only to discover that she's "barking up the wrong tree"), when combined with Fanthorp's love for Cornelia Robson and the central triangle, could be seen as a comment on how seldom love is reciprocated.

              This bodes very well for the future, and I'd dearly like to see Cards on the Table, Mrs. McGinty's Dead and After the Funeral.

              Nick


              'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).


              ---------------------------------
              Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • MG4273@aol.com
              Brief OT note: In 1980, Frances de la Tour starred along with Bob Hoskins in a 6 hour BBC drama about the earliest days of the British silent film industry,
              Message 6 of 23 , Jul 4, 2004
                Brief OT note:
                In 1980, Frances de la Tour starred along with Bob Hoskins in a 6 hour BBC
                drama about the earliest days of the British silent film industry, "Flickers".
                This is one of the best dramatic presentations I have ever seen,
                extraordinarily rich in characterization. It is not a GA story or a mystery at all, although
                its well reconstructed early 20th Century setting would probably appeal to
                most GA readers.
                Had to post this, when reading de la Tour is in the new "Death on the Nile".

                Mike Grost
              • Nicholas Fuller
                Mrs. Otterbourne always seems to be one of the great comic parts Christie wrote. Just as Angela Lanbury stole every scene she was in in the Ustinov film (and
                Message 7 of 23 , Jul 4, 2004
                  Mrs. Otterbourne always seems to be one of the great comic parts Christie wrote. Just as Angela Lanbury stole every scene she was in in the Ustinov film (and was easily the best thing about it), de la Tour is great here. She delivers her fruity dialogue with relish, including a lovely line about being "nibbled by haddocks". The dialogue in this adaptation, by the way, could well be the wittiest in the series so far.

                  Incidentally, wasn't de la Tour Caligula's second wife in I, Claudius?

                  Nick


                  'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).


                  ---------------------------------
                  Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Tony Medawar
                  Vera Claythorne ... ropey ... geddit!!!! ... From: Nicholas Fuller To: Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2004
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jul 5, 2004
                    Vera Claythorne ... ropey ... geddit!!!!


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Nicholas Fuller" <stoke_moran@...>
                    To: <GAdetection@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2004 7:55 AM
                    Subject: [GAdetection] And Then There Were None


                    >
                    > Last night I attended an amateur performance of Christie's And Then There
                    Were None (Tempo Theatre, Belconnen). Although some of the performances
                    were rather ropy (Vera Claythorne spoke her lines as though reading them off
                    a cue-card and Dr. Armstrong was rather wooden), most of the cast was very
                    good indeed. General Mackenzie did a very good portrayal of senility; Miss
                    Brent's fits of religious fervour were genuinely disturbing at times; and
                    Blore, Captain Lombard and Mrs. Rogers were all excellent.
                    >
                    > What really struck me, though, was the importance of playing it straight.
                    Christie knew what she was doing when she wrote it as a black drawing-room
                    comedy. There is a great deal of humour, e.g. Marston's lines about "jolly
                    bad luck" to have run over a couple of children, even the growing suspicion
                    in the second act is not without its humorous side (the lines about the
                    biscuits, for example). Christie knows that we need humour both to relieve
                    and to increase the tension--after all, films which go in for blood and guts
                    without a pause tend to become increasingly farcical.
                    >
                    > The more recent films (I haven't seen the 1940s version) have both been
                    dreadful. The Baghdad hotel and African safari settings were both so
                    outlandish that it was difficult to believe in the multiple murders by
                    nursery rhyme. To make the play work, to make it believable, it needs to be
                    grounded in reality: a fairly normal setting: a brand-new mansion on an
                    island, the sort of place where fashionable house parties would be held.
                    Because we are used to seeing Lord Edgware stabbed to death in his mansion,
                    Rex Fortescue poisoned in his and Lady Tressilian battered to death in hers,
                    we are more likely to accept that ten people would be killed than if they
                    were stranded in a balloon flying over the Andes.
                    >
                    > Another thing which I noticed was how excellent Christie's pacing was.
                    She has the gift of knowing what to do, when--at the exact moment. The play
                    begins very slowly, as the characters are introduced to each other and to
                    the audience, and then begins to gather pace with the three murders
                    committed in the first act. By the end of the second act, events have begun
                    to move so quickly that they nearly get out of control--but only nearly,
                    never quite.
                    >
                    > All in all, a very agreeable evening.
                    >
                    > Nick
                    >
                    >
                    > 'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it
                    has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys
                    Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Nicholas Fuller
                    What one may term gallows humour! Nick Tony Medawar wrote: Vera Claythorne ... ropey ... geddit!!!! ... From: Nicholas Fuller
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jul 5, 2004
                      What one may term gallows humour!

                      Nick
                      Tony Medawar <tonymedawar@...> wrote:
                      Vera Claythorne ... ropey ... geddit!!!!


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Nicholas Fuller" <stoke_moran@...>
                      To: <GAdetection@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2004 7:55 AM
                      Subject: [GAdetection] And Then There Were None


                      >
                      > Last night I attended an amateur performance of Christie's And Then There
                      Were None (Tempo Theatre, Belconnen). Although some of the performances
                      were rather ropy (Vera Claythorne spoke her lines as though reading them off
                      a cue-card and Dr. Armstrong was rather wooden), most of the cast was very
                      good indeed. General Mackenzie did a very good portrayal of senility; Miss
                      Brent's fits of religious fervour were genuinely disturbing at times; and
                      Blore, Captain Lombard and Mrs. Rogers were all excellent.
                      >
                      > What really struck me, though, was the importance of playing it straight.
                      Christie knew what she was doing when she wrote it as a black drawing-room
                      comedy. There is a great deal of humour, e.g. Marston's lines about "jolly
                      bad luck" to have run over a couple of children, even the growing suspicion
                      in the second act is not without its humorous side (the lines about the
                      biscuits, for example). Christie knows that we need humour both to relieve
                      and to increase the tension--after all, films which go in for blood and guts
                      without a pause tend to become increasingly farcical.
                      >
                      > The more recent films (I haven't seen the 1940s version) have both been
                      dreadful. The Baghdad hotel and African safari settings were both so
                      outlandish that it was difficult to believe in the multiple murders by
                      nursery rhyme. To make the play work, to make it believable, it needs to be
                      grounded in reality: a fairly normal setting: a brand-new mansion on an
                      island, the sort of place where fashionable house parties would be held.
                      Because we are used to seeing Lord Edgware stabbed to death in his mansion,
                      Rex Fortescue poisoned in his and Lady Tressilian battered to death in hers,
                      we are more likely to accept that ten people would be killed than if they
                      were stranded in a balloon flying over the Andes.
                      >
                      > Another thing which I noticed was how excellent Christie's pacing was.
                      She has the gift of knowing what to do, when--at the exact moment. The play
                      begins very slowly, as the characters are introduced to each other and to
                      the audience, and then begins to gather pace with the three murders
                      committed in the first act. By the end of the second act, events have begun
                      to move so quickly that they nearly get out of control--but only nearly,
                      never quite.
                      >
                      > All in all, a very agreeable evening.
                      >
                      > Nick
                      >
                      >
                      > 'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it
                      has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys
                      Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).
                      >
                      >
                      > ---------------------------------
                      > Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >



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                      'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).


                      ---------------------------------
                      Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Nicholas Fuller
                      Oh my aunt, my only aunt! Group set up. Discussion H.C. Bailey. Quite so. No members no. All alone. Not nice, no. Quite so. However. Study to improve.
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jul 7, 2004
                        Oh my aunt, my only aunt! Group set up. Discussion H.C. Bailey. Quite so. No members no. All alone. Not nice, no. Quite so. However. Study to improve. Invite you all: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hcbailey.

                        Nick Fuller

                        (trottin' off to regale self with saffron buns filled with strawberry jam and clotted cream, my own invention)

                        agh7746 <agh7746@...> wrote:
                        Hi Nick:

                        Good to hear from you. Before we get down to GA business, are you now finished with school? What's next for you? And before I leave the personal note, I did see your updates, and they are appreciated. I know they must be incredibly time consuming, so I don't like to ask people to do updates (although I once did with Christian). The only thing you have to do, and I know I am being pushy, is update the photos of you. We want to see how you've grown over the years.

                        Maybe you're right about Two Tickets. But the killer was so very obvious that everything went downhill from there. I don't have, and probably now won't look for, Common Sense. Thanks for the heads-up on that title.

                        I knew I couldn't be the only one who thought Munitions was awful. Just checked Barzun and saw the review. They must have read an earlier draft than the final published copy. Sure wasn't the same book I am in the middle of. And speaking of being in the middle of, I just can't devote anymore time to this title. There are too many good books on my shelves that need to be reading.

                        I recently acquired a copy of Night's Cloak by another favorite of mine, E. R. Punshon, featuring Inspector Bobby Owens. It has a reputation of being a true detective story, which I know I will enjoy.

                        As for the other Cole titles you mentioned, I've read Death of a Millionaire and Murder at Crome House, both of which I totally enjoyed. The others I do not have. One bad Cole you didn't mention is Dr. Tancred Begins, a totally horrible read. And I finished last month The Blatchington Tangle, which I did enjoy. Supt. Wilson is no longer at Scotland Yard, and does the unimaginable at the end.... something I can't reveal as it is a spoiler in the strictest sense of the word.

                        Again, good to hear from you,

                        Anita



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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                        'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).


                        ---------------------------------
                        Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • billvw221
                        Feeling very Lomas-like this morning. Can t seem to find the group. Have the yahoos hidden it somewhere? Bill
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jul 8, 2004
                          Feeling very Lomas-like this morning. Can't seem to find the group.
                          Have the yahoos hidden it somewhere?
                          Bill
                        • Christian Henriksson
                          ... From the above, I suspect that that s the only reason I haven t heard from Anita, because otherwise she d have had every right to call me on the long wait
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jul 8, 2004
                            > agh7746 <agh7746@...> wrote:
                            > Hi Nick:
                            >
                            > Good to hear from you. Before we get down to GA business, are you now
                            > finished with school? What's next for you? And before I leave the
                            > personal note, I did see your updates, and they are appreciated. I
                            > know they must be incredibly time consuming, so I don't like to ask
                            > people to do updates (although I once did with Christian).

                            From the above, I suspect that that's the only reason I haven't heard from
                            Anita, because otherwise she'd have had every right to call me on the long
                            wait for an update of my site.

                            Fear no more, though, because as of tonight the site has been updated.
                            One new author has been added (Rufus King), and many others (check the
                            What's New Page to see which) have been added to or changed. For those
                            of you who use my pages as the end-all and be-all of bibliographies (which
                            is just a fancier way of saying "Christian") it might be worth looking up those
                            authors' pages...

                            If work treats me kindly I might add some more authors, but we'll see.

                            Back to being silent again...

                            Christian Henriksson
                            (christianhenriksson@...)
                            --
                            The human race, to which so many of my
                            readers belong.
                            - G. K. Chesterton
                          • agh7746
                            Hi Christian: I do think of you often as I use your bibliography to check off books I have added to my collections, and books still missing. I miss you in the
                            Message 13 of 23 , Jul 8, 2004
                              Hi Christian:

                              I do think of you often as I use your bibliography to check off books I have added to my collections, and books still missing. I miss you in the group, and hope that if works permits, you will stop lurking and get back to participating.

                              Hope all else is well, and I will check the site later tonight.

                              Anita


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Christian Henriksson
                              To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Thursday, July 08, 2004 12:37 PM
                              Subject: [GAdetection] Updates and such


                              > agh7746 <agh7746@...> wrote:
                              > Hi Nick:
                              >
                              > Good to hear from you. Before we get down to GA business, are you now
                              > finished with school? What's next for you? And before I leave the
                              > personal note, I did see your updates, and they are appreciated. I
                              > know they must be incredibly time consuming, so I don't like to ask
                              > people to do updates (although I once did with Christian).

                              From the above, I suspect that that's the only reason I haven't heard from
                              Anita, because otherwise she'd have had every right to call me on the long
                              wait for an update of my site.

                              Fear no more, though, because as of tonight the site has been updated.
                              One new author has been added (Rufus King), and many others (check the
                              What's New Page to see which) have been added to or changed. For those
                              of you who use my pages as the end-all and be-all of bibliographies (which
                              is just a fancier way of saying "Christian") it might be worth looking up those
                              authors' pages...

                              If work treats me kindly I might add some more authors, but we'll see.

                              Back to being silent again...

                              Christian Henriksson
                              (christianhenriksson@...)
                              --
                              The human race, to which so many of my
                              readers belong.
                              - G. K. Chesterton



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                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Nicholas Fuller
                              Dear Bill, The address is: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hcbailey/ Regards, Nick billvw221 wrote: Feeling very Lomas-like this
                              Message 14 of 23 , Jul 8, 2004
                                Dear Bill,

                                The address is: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hcbailey/

                                Regards,

                                Nick

                                billvw221 <billvw@...> wrote:
                                Feeling very Lomas-like this morning. Can't seem to find the group.
                                Have the yahoos hidden it somewhere?
                                Bill


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                                ---------------------------------
                                Yahoo! Groups Links

                                To visit your group on the web, go to:
                                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GAdetection/

                                To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                GAdetection-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                                'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).


                                ---------------------------------
                                Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Patrick O
                                Below is my full review of the novel, as well as an announcement of an upcoming ten-part series of articles (inspired by the novel) that I will collaborate on
                                Message 15 of 23 , Jan 11, 2012
                                  Below is my full review of the novel, as well as an announcement of an upcoming ten-part series of articles (inspired by the novel) that I will collaborate on with Curt Evans:

                                  <http://at-scene-of-crime.blogspot.com/2012/01/death-invites-you.html>
                                • Tony Medawar
                                  Very much looking forward to this! From: Patrick O Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2012 9:07 PM To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com Subject: [GAdetection] And Then
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Jan 11, 2012
                                    Very much looking forward to this!

                                    From: Patrick O
                                    Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2012 9:07 PM
                                    To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: [GAdetection] And Then There Were None


                                    Below is my full review of the novel, as well as an announcement of an upcoming ten-part series of articles (inspired by the novel) that I will collaborate on with Curt Evans:

                                    <http://at-scene-of-crime.blogspot.com/2012/01/death-invites-you.html>





                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Alan Cassady-Bishop
                                    Enjoy the production.  I ve seen it twice (in two different cities, by two different directors) and even with the diversion from the novel, it is usually
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Mar 10, 2015
                                      Enjoy the production.  I've seen it twice (in two different cities, by two different directors) and even with the diversion from the novel, it is usually good.
                                    • Mike D.
                                      For those that receive The Lifetime Channel, there is a new TV adaptation of Agatha Christie s And Then There Were None that starts tomorrow (Sunday the
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Mar 12, 2016
                                        For those that receive The Lifetime Channel, there is a new TV adaptation of Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None that  starts tomorrow (Sunday the 13th), airing in two parts. Cast includes Sam Neill, Miranda Richardson, and Toby Stephens. I've seen no reviews, so can't offer any opinions on the production.


                                        Mike D.
                                      • Simon Bao
                                        Mike D, I saw the new mini-series when it was on BBC One.  It has a fine cast and is well acted.  It s the same *basic* story as in the novel; liberties are
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Mar 12, 2016
                                          Mike D, I saw the new mini-series when it was on BBC One.  It has a fine cast and is well acted.  It's the same *basic* story as in the novel; liberties are taken but they don't alter the story in important ways, and certainly not as in the 1945 film.  And I don't think there were any major changes for 2016 that Agatha Christie would have object to - only some minor details that appear now, which Christie could never have got past the censors in her time. But I promise there's no "I'm *not* Mr. Lombard" stuff.  The series is heavy on atmospherics but I think the series gets the most out of the atmospherics.  It's unrelentingly dark and deadly. 

                                          One further note, of possible interest to some.  The plot requires actor Aiden Turner to turn up standing in the hallway for a gratuitous half-naked shot, clad only in a rather low-slung towel.  Clearly he is not concealing a pistol!  Female viewers in the UK, and some male viewers, nearly broke Twitter when that scene came on the telly.  




                                          On Saturday, March 12, 2016 8:49 PM, "'Mike D.' mdmeleagro945@... [GAdetection]" <GAdetection@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                                           
                                          For those that receive The Lifetime Channel, there is a new TV adaptation of Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None that  starts tomorrow (Sunday the 13th), airing in two parts. Cast includes Sam Neill, Miranda Richardson, and Toby Stephens. I've seen no reviews, so can't offer any opinions on the production.


                                          Mike D.


                                        • alanjbishop1
                                          As said, the production standards of this version are fantastic. The atmosphere is almost palpable and even knowing the plot doesn t take away the mystery and
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Mar 14, 2016
                                            As said, the production standards of this version are fantastic. The atmosphere is almost palpable and even knowing the plot doesn't take away the mystery and threat you feel from watching it.
                                            This version is a return to the novel's plot rather than the theater/cinema treatment - it's a return to the dark, bleak story where the romance is in the past.
                                            As well as some tinkering with the novel in sub-plots and back stories - only to be expected in any "take" on the original - there is strong language used which many people objected to. While I agree Christie never used the expletives that pepper the island as bodies start to pile up, it is a more realistic show of the strain put on the characters. Imagine if you were one of four "survivors" in the murderous rampage - I certainly wouldn't restrain myself to a few "damn"s  and "gosh!"

                                            Worth watching but be warned - not for the faint-hearted which, I think, was the effect on the contemporary reader of the novel.
                                          • Mike D.
                                            I enjoyed the movie very much. It was nice to finally see a mostly faithful adaptation. Good cast, good sets, good everything. The only thing I was a bit
                                            Message 21 of 23 , Mar 17, 2016
                                              I enjoyed the movie very much. It was nice to finally see a mostly faithful adaptation. Good cast, good sets, good everything. The only thing I was a bit surprised about (and I have no idea why) was the big exposed house stuck on top of a big rock in the ocean. It just looked anomalous, inexplicably.

                                              I kept it on the DVR and might go back and re-watch some pf it in a few weeks.


                                              Mike D.


                                              March 14, 2016 at 02:40
                                               

                                              As said, the production standards of this version are fantastic. The atmosphere is almost palpable and even knowing the plot doesn't take away the mystery and threat you feel from watching it.

                                              This version is a return to the novel's plot rather than the theater/cinema treatment - it's a return to the dark, bleak story where the romance is in the past.
                                              As well as some tinkering with the novel in sub-plots and back stories - only to be expected in any "take" on the original - there is strong language used which many people objected to. While I agree Christie never used the expletives that pepper the island as bodies start to pile up, it is a more realistic show of the strain put on the characters. Imagine if you were one of four "survivors" in the murderous rampage - I certainly wouldn't restrain myself to a few "damn"s  and "gosh!"

                                              Worth watching but be warned - not for the faint-hearted which, I think, was the effect on the contemporary reader of the novel.
                                               

                                              For those that receive The Lifetime Channel, there is a new TV adaptation of Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None that  starts tomorrow (Sunday the 13th), airing in two parts. Cast includes Sam Neill, Miranda Richardson, and Toby Stephens. I've seen no reviews, so can't offer any opinions on the production.


                                              Mike D.


                                            • Simon Bao
                                              Mike, the very creepy house on Soldier Island was CGI - at least the shots that showed it isolated on a tree-less, wind-swept, almost feature-less landscape.
                                              Message 22 of 23 , Mar 17, 2016
                                                Mike, the very creepy house on Soldier Island was CGI - at least the shots that showed it isolated on a tree-less, wind-swept, almost feature-less landscape.  The true-to-1939 interiors were a real house, but the big exposed house stuck on top of a big rock in the ocean was creepy CGI.  :-)  -simon



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