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Re: [GAdetection] Book Fair Finds

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  • Nicholas Fuller
    Experiment in Crime (proper title Nothing but the Truth) is widely supposed to be one of Rhode s worst books. Walling is a much-maligned author; while he
    Message 1 of 16 , May 1 12:40 AM
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      Experiment in Crime (proper title Nothing but the
      Truth) is widely supposed to be one of Rhode's worst
      books.

      Walling is a much-maligned author; while he certainly
      isn't one of the best writers, and his plots are often
      anti-climactic (he seems afraid of making anyone a
      villain and so always makes the crime manslaughter),
      he's a pleasant second-rate writer. MR. TOLEFREE'S
      RELUCTANT WITNESSES (of which I have a signed copy in
      dust-jacket, which I bought for a song in January) is
      probably his best, although THE CORPSE IN THE CRIMSON
      SLIPPERS is also recommended.

      Regards,

      N.L. Fuller


      --- mike5568 <mike5568@...> wrote: > Came back
      with a bunch of hard-cover editions of the
      > following: The
      > Body On The Floor and The Other Bullet by Nancy Barr
      > Mavity ($2.00
      > apiece and in very good condition). Experiment in
      > Crime by John
      > Rhode ($1.00 in excellent condition). Death On My
      > Left by Philip
      > MacDonald ($7.00 in very good condition). I had
      > never heard of this
      > book by MacDonald, it`s from 1933 and is an Anthony
      > Gerthryn novel.
      > Also two by R.A.J. Walling, The Corpse With A Blue
      > Cravat and A
      > Corpse By Any Other Name. Anyone familiar with any
      > of these titles?
      > I have never read Mavity and only read one book by
      > Rhode (The
      > Claverton Affair).
      >
      >

      =====
      'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).

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    • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
      Mike- If you paid a dollar for Rhode s Experiment in Crime you paid too much. I read (and actually finished) Experiment about eight years ago and I cannot
      Message 2 of 16 , May 1 7:03 PM
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        Mike- If you paid a dollar for Rhode's Experiment in Crime you paid too much. I read (and actually finished) Experiment about eight years ago and I cannot think of any mystery novel, by any writer, at ANY time, that wrote a worse book than this. You could almost forgive it for being astonishingly boring (which it is), or routine, uninspired, or wooden. Other books have these faults... But I have never read a mystery that had such an awful ending. The way the murderer is captured makes me shudder just to think about it. That a fine writer like Rhode was a part of this makes me sad. That a great detective like Priestley would even dare suggest what he does in this book would have every lawyer and judge howling for his head. I think that someday I may find a worse mystery than Experiment in Crime but I hope I'm either lucky enough to avoid it or will find the sense to stop reading it. I did neither with Experiment and its taste still lingers...

        Richard

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: mike5568
        Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 1:50 PM
        To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [GAdetection] Book Fair Finds

        Came back with a bunch of hard-cover editions of the following: The
        Body On The Floor and The Other Bullet by Nancy Barr Mavity ($2.00
        apiece and in very good condition). Experiment in Crime by John
        Rhode ($1.00 in excellent condition). Death On My Left by Philip
        MacDonald ($7.00 in very good condition). I had never heard of this
        book by MacDonald, it`s from 1933 and is an Anthony Gerthryn novel.
        Also two by R.A.J. Walling, The Corpse With A Blue Cravat and A
        Corpse By Any Other Name. Anyone familiar with any of these titles?
        I have never read Mavity and only read one book by Rhode (The
        Claverton Affair).




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      • mike5568
        Alias Basil Willing by Helen McCloy, I Could Murder Her by E.C.R. Lorac, Florentine Finish by Cornelius Hirschberg, The Hog Murders by William DeAndrea, The
        Message 3 of 16 , May 7 5:22 PM
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          Alias Basil Willing by Helen McCloy, I Could Murder Her by E.C.R.
          Lorac, Florentine Finish by Cornelius Hirschberg, The Hog Murders by
          William DeAndrea, The Big Kiss-Off Of 1944 by Andrew Bergman, Gold
          Comes In Bricks by A.A. Fair, Leave It To Psmith by P.G. Wodehouse,
          Adventures Of Solar Pons by August Derleth. Comments? MikeB
        • Barry Ergang
          ... It s been years since I read it, but I remember enjoying THE BIG KISS-OFF OF 1944 a great deal. I own some of the Solar Pons collections, but haven t read
          Message 4 of 16 , May 7 7:34 PM
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            --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "mike5568" <mike5568@y...> wrote:
            > Alias Basil Willing by Helen McCloy, I Could Murder Her by E.C.R.
            > Lorac, Florentine Finish by Cornelius Hirschberg, The Hog Murders by
            > William DeAndrea, The Big Kiss-Off Of 1944 by Andrew Bergman, Gold
            > Comes In Bricks by A.A. Fair, Leave It To Psmith by P.G. Wodehouse,
            > Adventures Of Solar Pons by August Derleth. Comments? MikeB

            It's been years since I read it, but I remember enjoying THE BIG
            KISS-OFF OF 1944 a great deal.

            I own some of the Solar Pons collections, but haven't read anything in
            them in God knows how long. I remember the stories I read as being
            clever pastiches.
          • MG4273@aol.com
            Have only read a few of these. Actually, liked other books by the same authors better. Alias Basil Willing by Helen McCloy is quite grim - prefer her Two
            Message 5 of 16 , May 8 1:48 AM
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              Have only read a few of these. Actually, liked other books by the same
              authors better. "Alias Basil Willing" by Helen McCloy is quite grim - prefer her
              "Two Thirds of a Ghost" and "The Goblin Market", both of which are richly
              written, with much inventiveness throughout. But there is a clever puzzle plot idea
              in "Alias Basil Willing".
              "The HOG Murders" by William DeAndrea. Did not like this one as much as its
              sequel, "The Werewolf Murders". Have not yet read the third book in the series,
              "The Manx Murders". DeAndrea could really plot. His best books are modern
              classics in the Golden Age style. His early death is a huge, tragic loss for
              mystery fiction. Also really enjoyed "Killed in the Ratings" and "Killed in
              Paradise" in his Matt Cobb series. And "Encyclopedia Mysteriosa", his reference book
              on mystery fiction, is a great browsing book, endlessly fun to read.

              Mike Grost
            • Enrique F. Bird
              Mike, If you love Golden Age stories, you will love The Hog Murders . I recently re-read it and loved it again! Best regards, Enrique F. Bird Picó ... From:
              Message 6 of 16 , May 8 9:21 AM
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                Mike,

                If you love Golden Age stories, you will love "The Hog Murders". I recently
                re-read it and loved it again!

                Best regards,
                Enrique F. Bird Picó

                -----Original Message-----
                From: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com [mailto:GAdetection@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of mike5568
                Sent: Saturday, May 07, 2005 8:23 PM
                To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [GAdetection] Book Fair Finds

                Alias Basil Willing by Helen McCloy, I Could Murder Her by E.C.R.
                Lorac, Florentine Finish by Cornelius Hirschberg, The Hog Murders by
                William DeAndrea, The Big Kiss-Off Of 1944 by Andrew Bergman, Gold
                Comes In Bricks by A.A. Fair, Leave It To Psmith by P.G. Wodehouse,
                Adventures Of Solar Pons by August Derleth. Comments? MikeB






                Yahoo! Groups Links
              • Christian Henriksson
                ... The Wodehouse novel was the one that introduced me to humor novels - a great introduction to the world of Wodehouse. I haven t read any of the other Psmith
                Message 7 of 16 , May 8 10:33 AM
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                  Lo and behold, on 8 May 2005 at 0:22, mike5568 sayeth thus:

                  > Alias Basil Willing by Helen McCloy, I Could Murder Her by E.C.R.
                  > Lorac, Florentine Finish by Cornelius Hirschberg, The Hog Murders by
                  > William DeAndrea, The Big Kiss-Off Of 1944 by Andrew Bergman, Gold
                  > Comes In Bricks by A.A. Fair, Leave It To Psmith by P.G. Wodehouse,
                  > Adventures Of Solar Pons by August Derleth. Comments? MikeB

                  The Wodehouse novel was the one that introduced me to humor novels - a great
                  introduction to the world of Wodehouse. I haven't read any of the other Psmith novels,
                  so I can't compare it to them, but it's nevertheless a really good Blandings book.



                  Christian Henriksson
                  (christian.henriksson@...)
                  --
                  The human race, to which so many of my
                  readers belong.
                  - G. K. Chesterton
                • Wyatt James
                  I ve always thought it was a pity Wodehouse didn t write any detective stories to speak of. He was a master plotter. ... a great ... other Psmith novels, ...
                  Message 8 of 16 , May 8 11:54 AM
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                    I've always thought it was a pity Wodehouse didn't write any detective
                    stories to speak of. He was a master plotter.


                    --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Christian Henriksson"
                    <christian.henriksson@c...> wrote:
                    > Lo and behold, on 8 May 2005 at 0:22, mike5568 sayeth thus:
                    >
                    > > Alias Basil Willing by Helen McCloy, I Could Murder Her by E.C.R.
                    > > Lorac, Florentine Finish by Cornelius Hirschberg, The Hog Murders by
                    > > William DeAndrea, The Big Kiss-Off Of 1944 by Andrew Bergman, Gold
                    > > Comes In Bricks by A.A. Fair, Leave It To Psmith by P.G. Wodehouse,
                    > > Adventures Of Solar Pons by August Derleth. Comments? MikeB
                    >
                    > The Wodehouse novel was the one that introduced me to humor novels -
                    a great
                    > introduction to the world of Wodehouse. I haven't read any of the
                    other Psmith novels,
                    > so I can't compare it to them, but it's nevertheless a really good
                    Blandings book.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Christian Henriksson
                    > (christian.henriksson@c...)
                    > --
                    > The human race, to which so many of my
                    > readers belong.
                    > - G. K. Chesterton
                  • Mike Blake
                    ... Comments on the these three, which I read long, long ago... KISS-OFF: Read and enjoyed when it first came out in paperback, but other than that all I can
                    Message 9 of 16 , May 8 2:25 PM
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                      This group's original MikeB listed among others:

                      > The Big Kiss-Off Of 1944 by Andrew Bergman
                      > Gold Comes In Bricks by A.A. Fair
                      > Adventures Of Solar Pons by August Derleth.

                      And asked:

                      >Comments? MikeB

                      Comments on the these three, which I read long, long ago...

                      KISS-OFF: Read and enjoyed when it first came out in paperback,
                      but other than that all I can remember about it is that it's the
                      first in the Jack Levine series, and I liked the second,
                      HOLLYWOOD AND LEVINE, even more.

                      GOLD BRICKS: Another I can't remember. except that I am fond of
                      the series in general, but thought the one immediately after this
                      one, SPILL THE JACKPOT, the best in the series.

                      ADVENTURES: I seem to have a theme here: the first, but not the
                      best, of the Pons collections.

                      --Mike Blake
                    • pugmire1
                      I agree, he could have been very good. One can only assume his prodigious output left him no time. The only detective story that I know of is a reasonably
                      Message 10 of 16 , May 9 1:12 PM
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                        I agree, he could have been very good. One can only assume his
                        prodigious output left him no time. The only detective story that I
                        know of is a reasonably competent locked-room originally
                        entitled 'The Education of Detective Oakes', and reprinted in EQMM
                        May 1978 as 'Death at the Excelsior'.

                        John P.

                        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Wyatt James" <grobius@s...>
                        wrote:
                        > I've always thought it was a pity Wodehouse didn't write any
                        detective
                        > stories to speak of. He was a master plotter.
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Christian Henriksson"
                        > <christian.henriksson@c...> wrote:
                        > > Lo and behold, on 8 May 2005 at 0:22, mike5568 sayeth thus:
                        > >
                        > > > Alias Basil Willing by Helen McCloy, I Could Murder Her by
                        E.C.R.
                        > > > Lorac, Florentine Finish by Cornelius Hirschberg, The Hog
                        Murders by
                        > > > William DeAndrea, The Big Kiss-Off Of 1944 by Andrew Bergman,
                        Gold
                        > > > Comes In Bricks by A.A. Fair, Leave It To Psmith by P.G.
                        Wodehouse,
                        > > > Adventures Of Solar Pons by August Derleth. Comments? MikeB
                        > >
                        > > The Wodehouse novel was the one that introduced me to humor
                        novels -
                        > a great
                        > > introduction to the world of Wodehouse. I haven't read any of the
                        > other Psmith novels,
                        > > so I can't compare it to them, but it's nevertheless a really
                        good
                        > Blandings book.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Christian Henriksson
                        > > (christian.henriksson@c...)
                        > > --
                        > > The human race, to which so many of my
                        > > readers belong.
                        > > - G. K. Chesterton
                      • mike5568
                        The 57th annual St. Louis Book Fair started today and runs through next Wednesday. I went today and lasted an hour before the mass of humanity wore me down,
                        Message 11 of 16 , Apr 28, 2006
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                          The 57th annual St. Louis Book Fair started today and runs through
                          next Wednesday. I went today and lasted an hour before the mass of
                          humanity wore me down, every year it becomes more demanding of
                          stamina. Over a million books, with a quarter of them mystery and a
                          good amount of classic and some rarities available. The first day is
                          so tough with the crush of people, I did come away with the following:
                          2 by Erle Stanley Gardner- The DA Breaks A Seal and The DA Cooks A
                          Goose. Also The Floating Admiral by Detection Club Members, Light
                          Thickens by Marsch (her last and the only one I haven`t read), an old
                          Dell Mapback of The Continental Op by Hammett, The Under Dog by
                          Footner, Great American Detective Stories edited by Boucher and with a
                          real good lineup of authors, and Left Handed Death by Richard Hull.
                          I`ll make a couple other visits before the fair closes down Wednesday
                          since it`s about half a mile from me. I haven`t read any of the books
                          I bought so any opinions are welcome. MikeB
                        • nick
                          ... I know that we have discussed this one before on-list (and the other collaborative effort - The Scoop?). Judged as a decent mystery it is - IMO - a near
                          Message 12 of 16 , Apr 29, 2006
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                            > Also The Floating Admiral by Detection Club Members,
                            > I haven`t read any of the books
                            > I bought so any opinions are welcome. MikeB

                            I know that we have discussed this one before
                            on-list (and the other collaborative effort - The Scoop?).
                            Judged as a decent mystery it is - IMO - a
                            near complete failure - but it remains of great
                            interest to all fans of British GA writing because
                            of the authors involved. It also opens the way
                            to fascinating discussions about why it fails, the differences
                            between the writers, whether such a collaboration
                            is doomed to failure and so on.

                            :) - it is a book of which I would say don't be misled
                            by the opening - which is quite promising - it gets
                            much worse! I think I recall however that others
                            saw it in a more charitable light.

                            NickH.
                          • Nicholas Fuller
                            I have to say that I enjoyed it a lot. Given that it s written by thirteen authors without direction, it s surprisingly successful. Unlike Crime on the
                            Message 13 of 16 , Apr 30, 2006
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                              I have to say that I enjoyed it a lot. Given that it's written by thirteen authors without direction, it's surprisingly successful. Unlike Crime on the Coast, which is a shaggy dog story, or No Flowers by Request, which sets up plot threads and then ignores them, it's internally coherent and consistent. Since many of the authors are from the same school of detection - not so much "humdrum" (a term which is only meaningful when applied to Crofts, since the Coles' early work is often satirical, Connington makes a definite attempt at characterisation in many of the Driffields, Rhode is underrated as both a writer and a writer of character [think of the woman doctor in Murder, MD or the characters in The Three Corpse Trick] and many of Christie's books up to 1934 are no different from those by, say, the Coles) as "orthodox" - there are no great differences in style, except for GK Chesterton. It's interesting to see the authors' handling of the traditional clues of tide and
                              time-tables, wills, blackmail and black sheep, and their various solutions. Sayers's solution is, of course, the best (after Anthony Berkeley's "true" one), and the worst has to be Milward Kennedy's, where the reader learns that "X" is the murderer.

                              As you would expect, Crofts is unstoppable. We have yet another example of his horrible tendency to write mathematical problems as prose.

                              The first question was: How had Mount made the journey? Mount had a car, but most persons of moderate income went by train, rail being so much cheaper for the long distance. Mount had been at the Vicarage at one o’clock, and he had rung up Rudge from the Charing Cross Hotel at nine. There were two, and only two, trains he could have used, the 2.5 from Whynmouth, which reached Waterloo at 5.45, and the 4.25 from Whynmouth, arriving at 8.35...

                              He had gone by the 1.30 which connected at Passfield Junction with the 11.0 a.m. express from Waterloo to the west.

                              Gosh, Crofts really was a genius. Isn't he a more sensitive and intellectual writer than Blake, and a more exciting and atmospheric one than Carr?

                              Nick


                              "a citizen of the Universe, and a gentleman to boot"






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                            • mike5568
                              Catching up with some classics I`ve never read, I found The Moonstone by Collins, The Innocence Of Father Brown by Chesterton and The Valley Of Fear by Doyle.
                              Message 14 of 16 , Aug 26, 2006
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                                Catching up with some classics I`ve never read, I found The Moonstone
                                by Collins, The Innocence Of Father Brown by Chesterton and The Valley
                                Of Fear by Doyle. Also found some books by authors I really like,
                                Angels Of Doom by Charteris, After The Fine Weather and Trouble by
                                Michael Gilbert and Turn On The Heat by A.A. Fair. Any comments on
                                these?
                                BTW, total of cost for all books, $3.50. I love book fairs. MikeB
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