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Re: Belgian food for thought

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  • b_ergang
    It strikes me as a very valid analysis and conclusion, Xavier. ... made a point I found worthy to be shared with you all. As we were talking about role of
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 28, 2003
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      It strikes me as a very valid analysis and conclusion, Xavier.

      --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Xavier Lechard"
      <x.lechard@f...> wrote:
      > I had a discussion with a Belgian friend of mine* lately, and he
      made a point I found worthy to be shared with you all. As we were
      talking about role of police in mystery fiction, he pointed it was
      one of the most important differences between Anglo-Saxon and
      European schools - one of the most overlooked, too.
      > Anglo-Saxon school started with Edgar Allan Poe's Dupin, and never
      stopped from then to emphasize on independent detectives, either
      amateur or private investigator. Even though police-procedurals
      developed and became a major force, lone sleuth remains a trademark
      of American and, to a lesser degree, British mystery fiction. On the
      other hand, European school, and particularly French, started with
      Emile Gaboriau's Lecoq from the Sureté - in other words, a cop.
      Official police then always got the lead in European mysteries but
      for some famous yet little statistically important exceptions such
      as Rouletabille or Arsène Lupin.
      > My friend said a good evidence of that gap between the two schools
      is that when you think of a famous American or British detective,
      you think of Sherlock Holmes or Philip Marlowe, while Maigret is the
      first one coming to mind when it comes to famous European
      detectives.
      > What do you think of this opinion? I'll let my friend know about
      your replies and comments.
      >
      > Friendly,
      > Xavier
      >
      > * No, he isn't Hercule Poirot.
      >
      > "Existence is still a strange thing to me; and as a stranger, I
      gave it welcome."
      > G.K. Chesterton
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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