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Re: More Television

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  • b_ergang
    Good news, indeed--especially the Crispins. Now all I have to hope is that these programs are shown in the U.S. on A&E or PBS, because my cable company doesn t
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 3, 2003
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      Good news, indeed--especially the Crispins. Now all I have to hope
      is that these programs are shown in the U.S. on A&E or PBS, because
      my cable company doesn't make BBC America available.

      But why, for God's sake, don't they adapt some Carrs and Dicksons?

      --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Nicholas Fuller
      <stoke_moran@y...> wrote:
      > According to The Guardian, Chorion, which also owns the rights to
      Agatha Christie's detective stories, is planning to adapt the works
      of Margery Allingham and Edmund Crispin in the next few years. For
      more information, see:
      http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,975371,00.html.
      >
      > Nick
      >
      >
      > 'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially
      when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the
      printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Mobile
      > - Check & compose your email via SMS on your Telstra or Vodafone
      mobile.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Wyatt James
      I don t have even cable TV -- refuse to pay for all that extra junk they give you and making you pay extra for what you really want to watch. As for satellite,
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 4, 2003
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        I don't have even cable TV -- refuse to pay for all that extra junk
        they give you and making you pay extra for what you really want to
        watch. As for satellite, c'mon, 600 channels, how can you find
        anything amidst the garbage? But it really upsets me that the shows
        I'd like to watch (GAD related) such as Nero Wolfe, Monk, Poirot,
        Pascoe & Dalziel, etc. are not shown on the free networks. The PBS
        Mystery series, that does a few of them, is a rare fluke -- mysteries
        are too low-brow for those elitists in NYC, supporting the channel,
        who prefer to watch 'il pomposito' Pavaratti and other fat juicy-
        voiced tenors. (And if I misspelled his name, who cares? Likes of him
        would snub me if we ever ran across each other.)

        What I would really like would be re-broadcasts of the old radio
        shows, which included a lot of Carrs. National Public Radio should do
        them. Somebody should, anyway. Carr's mysstery novels may never have
        caught on as a subject for movie screenplays -- they would be hard to
        do convincingly -- but as an author he did create convincing 'live'
        drama in those succinct radio plays, and in many of his short stories.


        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "b_ergang" <bergang@o...> wrote:
        > Good news, indeed--especially the Crispins. Now all I have to hope
        > is that these programs are shown in the U.S. on A&E or PBS, because
        > my cable company doesn't make BBC America available.
        >
        > But why, for God's sake, don't they adapt some Carrs and Dicksons?
        >
        > --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Nicholas Fuller
        > <stoke_moran@y...> wrote:
        > > According to The Guardian, Chorion, which also owns the rights to
        > Agatha Christie's detective stories, is planning to adapt the works
        > of Margery Allingham and Edmund Crispin in the next few years. For
        > more information, see:
        > http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,975371,00.html.
        > >
        > > Nick
        > >
        > >
        > > 'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially
        > when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the
        > printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).
        > >
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------
        > > Yahoo! Mobile
        > > - Check & compose your email via SMS on your Telstra or Vodafone
        > mobile.
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • W. Peck
        I must immediately agree with you. Unfortunately, the only recourse seems to be the hundreds of old radio shows, comedy and drama alike, that have at least
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 4, 2003
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          I must immediately agree with you. Unfortunately, the only recourse seems
          to be the hundreds of old radio shows, comedy and drama alike, that have
          at
          least been made available on audiotape.
          ;
          --- Wyatt James <grobius@...> wrote:
          > I don't have even cable TV -- refuse to pay for all that extra junk
          > they give you and making you pay extra for what you really want to
          > watch. As for satellite, c'mon, 600 channels, how can you find
          > anything amidst the garbage? But it really upsets me that the shows
          > I'd like to watch (GAD related) such as Nero Wolfe, Monk, Poirot,
          > Pascoe & Dalziel, etc. are not shown on the free networks. The PBS
          > Mystery series, that does a few of them, is a rare fluke -- mysteries
          > are too low-brow for those elitists in NYC, supporting the channel,
          > who prefer to watch 'il pomposito' Pavaratti and other fat juicy-
          > voiced tenors. (And if I misspelled his name, who cares? Likes of him
          > would snub me if we ever ran across each other.)
          >
          > What I would really like would be re-broadcasts of the old radio
          > shows, which included a lot of Carrs. National Public Radio should do
          > them. Somebody should, anyway. Carr's mysstery novels may never have
          > caught on as a subject for movie screenplays -- they would be hard to
          > do convincingly -- but as an author he did create convincing 'live'
          > drama in those succinct radio plays, and in many of his short stories.
          >
          >
          > --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "b_ergang" <bergang@o...> wrote:
          > > Good news, indeed--especially the Crispins. Now all I have to hope
          > > is that these programs are shown in the U.S. on A&E or PBS, because
          > > my cable company doesn't make BBC America available.
          > >
          > > But why, for God's sake, don't they adapt some Carrs and Dicksons?
          > >
          > > --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Nicholas Fuller
          > > <stoke_moran@y...> wrote:
          > > > According to The Guardian, Chorion, which also owns the rights to
          > > Agatha Christie's detective stories, is planning to adapt the works
          > > of Margery Allingham and Edmund Crispin in the next few years. For
          > > more information, see:
          > > http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,975371,00.html.
          > > >
          > > > Nick
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > 'There is no past tense in the conjugation of genius, especially
          > > when it has left us whatever of itself can be conveyed by the
          > > printed page.'--Gladys Mitchell, Death and the Maiden (1947).
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > ---------------------------------
          > > > Yahoo! Mobile
          > > > - Check & compose your email via SMS on your Telstra or Vodafone
          > > mobile.
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >


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        • Jon Jermey
          Due to a loophole in US copyright law, US radio shows and scripts from before 1948 are generally in the public domain, and are starting to appear on the Web. I
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 4, 2003
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            Due to a loophole in US copyright law, US radio shows and scripts from
            before 1948 are generally in the public domain, and are starting to
            appear on the Web. I haven't found any Carrs, but they may be out there
            somewhere.

            See http://www.unknown.nu/mercury/ for audio files of a number of
            mystery radio plays, including The Thirty-Nine Steps, The Murder of
            Roger Ackroyd, and The Glass Key.

            http://simplyscripts.com/radio_af.html has some scripts, including
            Boston Blackie, Sergeant Preston and an Ellery Queen.


            Jon.


            > What I would really like would be re-broadcasts of the old radio
            > shows, which included a lot of Carrs. National Public Radio should do
            > them. Somebody should, anyway. Carr's mysstery novels may never have
            > caught on as a subject for movie screenplays -- they would be hard to
            > do convincingly -- but as an author he did create convincing 'live'
            > drama in those succinct radio plays, and in many of his short stories.

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