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Bits and pieces

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  • mike5568
    In the last couple of months, I`ve divided my readings into themes. In February, all English writers and in March all American writers. In regards to February,
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 1, 2003
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      In the last couple of months, I`ve divided my readings into themes.
      In February, all English writers and in March all American writers.
      In regards to February, Cyril Hare was my most pleasant discovery,
      having never read any of his books before, Tenant For Death and Death
      Is No Sportsman were both excellent reads, clear and concise
      mysteries with no fat on the bone. Very enjoyable. Also The Four
      False Weapons, the final Bencolin by Carr was very good. I really
      enjoyed all the Bencolin books Carr wrote, too bad he gave him up.
      In the good category a couple of Michael Innes non-Applebys were
      solid but not up to the usual standard of his best. Money From Holme
      really started well but just kind of ground to a halt at the end and
      In London Far was enjoyable but also didn`t come to any kind of
      satisfactory conclusions. Disappointments were Nicholas Blakes The
      Dreadful Hollow, which, while not dreadful wasn`t very good. And
      Heads You Lose by C.Brand, which was dreadful. Into March and the
      American authors, the best was Patrick Quentin with Puzzle for Fiends
      and Puzzle for Wantons. I`d give the slight edge to Fiends over
      Wantons. I thought Puzzle for Fiends took the "hero with amnesia"
      plotline and did a good job with it, something that could of easily
      been a corny disaster. But it was handled very good with a good
      exciting story. Having picked Richard Burke`s Here Lies The Body as
      my favorite book of last year, I read The Dead Take No Bows, which
      was his first book in the Quinny Hite series. Not up to the same
      level as Here Lies The Body, but a solid first entry in the slightly
      humorous, slightly hard-boiled genre. Read another enjoyable
      adventure of Dagobert and Jane Brown in Nobody Wore Black. Always a
      pleasure. My most pleasant surprise of March was The Frightened
      Stiff by Kelly Roos. Very good, very entertaining, another couple
      Jeff and Haila Troy, amateur sleuths coming upon murder after moving
      into their new apartment after getting married. This was the third
      in the series, written during the 1940`s when the Lockridges were
      doing the Mr. and Mrs. North books and Delano Ames was doing the
      Dagobert and Jane Brown books. This book by Kelly Roos is alot
      closer to the excellent Ames books than the usually bland and
      formulaic Lockridges. The Lockridges did seem to get better as they
      went along into the 1950`s, as Dead As A Dinosaur and Death Of An
      Angel prove, which I also read in March. Also read Repeat
      Performance by William O`Farrell. Very different, pretty good, not a
      mystery but I guess a suspense/thriller. Reminded me a little of
      Quentin`s Puzzle For Players, but jeez, it was a bit depressing.
      MikeB.
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