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speaking of becoming a dinosaur

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  • Allan Griffith
    Speaking of becoming a dinosaur, these days I confine myself entirely to the books of the past. I don t read vintage crime novels in addition to reading modern
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 21, 2014
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      Speaking of becoming a dinosaur, these days I confine myself entirely to the books of the past. I don’t read vintage crime novels in addition to reading modern crime novels. I read exclusively vintage crime. I generally avoid anything published after about the mid-1950s.


      I do the same in other genres. I enjoy horror and science fiction but I will only read the works of the past. In those genres my cut-off point is around 1940.


      And I do the same with movies and television series, although in the case of television I’m prepared to go as far as the 1970s.


      I came to the conclusion a few years back that I just don’t enjoy contemporary popular culture at all so I was wasting precious time bothering with it. Now I live happily in the world of the past.


      Are there any other dinosaurs like me out there?


      Al

    • Bob Houk
      I am definitely another member of the dinosaur club. ... these days I confine myself entirely to the books of the past. I donÆt read vintage crime novels in
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 21, 2014
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        I am definitely another member of the dinosaur club.

        "... these days I confine myself entirely to the books of the past. I don’t read vintage crime novels in addition to reading modern crime novels. I read exclusively vintage crime. I generally avoid anything published after about the mid-1950s."

        I make an exception for the later books by the the writers of the Golden Age. But otherwise, I'm with you.


        "I do the same in other genres. I enjoy horror and science fiction but I will only read the works of the past. In those genres my cut-off point is around 1940."

        Other than GAD, I mostly read PG Wodehouse (whose works are set in the GAD era -- actually, to be accurate, they're set in a fairyland that never existed, but bears a resemblance to the 1920s), and history (which also allows me to escape the modern world).


        "And I do the same with movies and television series, although in the case of television I’m prepared to go as far as the 1970s."

        I watch little TV (other than sports) or movies, but when I do my preferences are for movies of the thirties-fifties and TV of the fifties/sixties. I will admit to having enjoyed the new Sherlock series when my daughter introduced me to it recently.

         Bob


      • Allan Griffith
        ... I love Wodehouse. Have you ever seen the 1970s British WODEHOUSE PLAYHOUSE TV series? It s an absolute delight if you re a Wodehouse fan. It s such a
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 21, 2014
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          On 22 February 2014 03:21, Bob Houk <bobhouk@...> wrote:


          Other than GAD, I mostly read PG Wodehouse (whose works are set in the GAD era -- actually, to be accurate, they're set in a fairyland that never existed, but bears a resemblance to the 1920s), and history (which also allows me to escape the modern world).

          I love Wodehouse.

          Have you ever seen the 1970s British WODEHOUSE PLAYHOUSE TV series? It's an absolute delight if you're a Wodehouse fan.

          It's such a tragedy that the 1960s THE WORLD OF WOOSTER TV series hasn't survived. I have very fond memories of it.

          The more recent JEEVES AND WOOSTER series with Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie was in my opinion an abomination.

          Al
        • Bob Houk
          I have both the Wodehouse Playhouse and Jeeves and Wooster series on DVD, and I love them both. I would agree with you that the earlier series was better
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 21, 2014
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            I have both the Wodehouse Playhouse and Jeeves and Wooster series on DVD, and I love them both. I would agree with you that the earlier series was better (though quite obviously done on a budget of about ten pounds per episode).

            I haven't seen Blandings yet, since I'm only intermittently in the US these days, but the reviews have been mixed at best.

            Bob


            To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
            From: dfordoom@...
            Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 03:44:02 +1100
            Subject: Re: [GAdetection] speaking of becoming a dinosaur

             

            On 22 February 2014 03:21, Bob Houk <bobhouk@...> wrote:


            Other than GAD, I mostly read PG Wodehouse (whose works are set in the GAD era -- actually, to be accurate, they're set in a fairyland that never existed, but bears a resemblance to the 1920s), and history (which also allows me to escape the modern world).

            I love Wodehouse.

            Have you ever seen the 1970s British WODEHOUSE PLAYHOUSE TV series? It's an absolute delight if you're a Wodehouse fan.

            It's such a tragedy that the 1960s THE WORLD OF WOOSTER TV series hasn't survived. I have very fond memories of it.

            The more recent JEEVES AND WOOSTER series with Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie was in my opinion an abomination.

            Al

          • Mike Detlefsen
            To a certain extent, I belong to the Dinosaur Club also. There are a few contemporary writers I read, but I can almost count them on one hand. Most of my
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 21, 2014
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              To a certain extent, I belong to the Dinosaur Club also. There are a few contemporary writers I read, but I can almost count them on one hand. Most of my reading is mystery and sf from the nineteen twenties through the sixties. I seem to be partial to black-and-white movies, also.

              On the other hand, I do most of my reading on an ereader. :-)

              Mike




              On 21 Feb 2014, at 10:21 , Bob Houk wrote:

               

              I am definitely another member of the dinosaur club.

              "... these days I confine myself entirely to the books of the past. I don’t read vintage crime novels in addition to reading modern crime novels. I read exclusively vintage crime. I generally avoid anything published after about the mid-1950s."

              I make an exception for the later books by the the writers of the Golden Age. But otherwise, I'm with you.


              "I do the same in other genres. I enjoy horror and science fiction but I will only read the works of the past. In those genres my cut-off point is around 1940."

              Other than GAD, I mostly read PG Wodehouse (whose works are set in the GAD era -- actually, to be accurate, they're set in a fairyland that never existed, but bears a resemblance to the 1920s), and history (which also allows me to escape the modern world).


              "And I do the same with movies and television series, although in the case of television I’m prepared to go as far as the 1970s."

              I watch little TV (other than sports) or movies, but when I do my preferences are for movies of the thirties-fifties and TV of the fifties/sixties. I will admit to having enjoyed the new Sherlock series when my daughter introduced me to it recently.

               Bob




              "When everything impossible has been eliminated and what remains is supernatural, then someone is lying."
              -Isaac Asimov, 1973

            • Arthur Robinson
               I m a dinosaur too.  I read a lot of new non-fiction, but for fiction, I read almost entirely older books--Wodehouse, GAD, old plays.  I ve read only a few
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 22, 2014
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                 I'm a dinosaur too.  I read a lot of new non-fiction, but for fiction, I read almost entirely older books--Wodehouse, GAD, old plays.  I've read only a few of the more recent mysteries.  P.D. James is an excellent writer (my considering her a "newer" author clearly dates me), but I didn't get addicted to her novels.  I've enjoyed Dorothy Simpson and Martin Edwards (I just started on him recently), but they haven't infected me with the ravenous must-read-everything-this-author-wrote-now urge that Carr, Christie, Berkeley, etc. did.  This goes for non-mysteries too.  Occasionally I read modern best-sellers (Presumed Innocent etc.) because people tell me "I have to," but I rarely get beyond the first chapters (except for the Harry Potter books; I've read them all twice).
                 
                Someday I hope to read more P.D.James.  But first, I've still got a lot of Rhode, Wade, Mitchell etc. to read.
                 
                A propos of Miles Burton's Death of Two Brothers (mentioned on another thread), a couple of years ago a bookseller in Canada offered a copy for $22.  Unsurprisingly, someone beat me to it.  Nigel Williams offered another copy of that book a few years ago, but at £1320.00, I passed on it.


                Arthur Robinson, Reference Librarian
                Lewis Library, LaGrange College
                LaGrange, Georgia 30240
                USA


                On Friday, February 21, 2014 10:18 PM, Mike Detlefsen <mdmeleagro945@...> wrote:
                 
                To a certain extent, I belong to the Dinosaur Club also. There are a few contemporary writers I read, but I can almost count them on one hand. Most of my reading is mystery and sf from the nineteen twenties through the sixties. I seem to be partial to black-and-white movies, also.

                On the other hand, I do most of my reading on an ereader. :-)

                Mike




                On 21 Feb 2014, at 10:21 , Bob Houk wrote:

                 

                I am definitely another member of the dinosaur club.

                "... these days I confine myself entirely to the books of the past. I don’t read vintage crime novels in addition to reading modern crime novels. I read exclusively vintage crime. I generally avoid anything published after about the mid-1950s."

                I make an exception for the later books by the the writers of the Golden Age. But otherwise, I'm with you.


                "I do the same in other genres. I enjoy horror and science fiction but I will only read the works of the past. In those genres my cut-off point is around 1940."

                Other than GAD, I mostly read PG Wodehouse (whose works are set in the GAD era -- actually, to be accurate, they're set in a fairyland that never existed, but bears a resemblance to the 1920s), and history (which also allows me to escape the modern world).


                "And I do the same with movies and television series, although in the case of television I’m prepared to go as far as the 1970s."

                I watch little TV (other than sports) or movies, but when I do my preferences are for movies of the thirties-fifties and TV of the fifties/sixties. I will admit to having enjoyed the new Sherlock series when my daughter introduced me to it recently.

                 Bob




                "When everything impossible has been eliminated and what remains is supernatural, then someone is lying."
                -Isaac Asimov, 1973



              • Allan Griffith
                ... I ve read a few of her novels and enjoyed them well enough, but I also didn t get addicted. But at least she s better than Ruth Rendell *shudders* Al
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 22, 2014
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                  On 23 February 2014 03:04, Arthur Robinson <awrobins@...> wrote:


                   P.D. James is an excellent writer (my considering her a "newer" author clearly dates me), but I didn't get addicted to her novels.

                  I've read a few of her novels and enjoyed them well enough, but I also didn't get addicted.

                  But at least she's better than Ruth Rendell *shudders*

                  Al
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