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'The Green Cloak' (1910)

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  • miketooney49
    THE GREEN CLOAK. By Yorke Davis. Sturgis & Walton. 1910. 307 pages. Full review: Nothing is more amusing to the habitual reader of detective stories than the
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 16, 2013
      THE GREEN CLOAK.
      By Yorke Davis.
      Sturgis & Walton.
      1910. 307 pages.

      Full review:

      "Nothing is more amusing to the habitual reader of
      detective stories than the eagerness of the writers to
      seize on some method of varying the old themes.
      When Professor Munsterberg's articles on the
      detection of crime by the new instruments of the
      psychological laboratory were printed, it was
      perfectly safe to predict that we should have a
      flood of detective stories on the method. The
      other day we noticed 'Luther Trant'; to-day we
      have such another, in this case, however, the
      Sherlock Holmes of the laboratory being an
      ancient professor who has lived in Australia,
      whereas Luther Trant was a newcomer in the
      field. The sleuth-minded professor's life in the
      East is essential to the story, for the plot is
      compounded of Oriental pirates, the Maori
      speech, and other exotic flavors, though the
      scene is a very modern American suburb. The
      story is interesting, and the psychological
      apparatus is worked in cleverly."
      - Unsigned
      - "Current Fiction"
      - THE NATION
      - May 12, 1910
      - http://www.unz.org/Pub/Nation-1910may12-00483
      - [Scroll down to page 484, bottom right]

      Online here:
      - Archive.org:
      - http://archive.org/details/greencloak00compgoog
      and here:
      - Google Books:
      - http://tinyurl.com/mmeohhk
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