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Re: [GAdetection] Re: Edith Nesbit

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  • Allan Griffith
    ... It seems like mystery stories embraced both crime stories and horror stories up to about the mid-20th century. The term thriller was also used
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 1 12:56 AM
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      On 1 August 2013 04:43, miketooney49 <miketooney49@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > Dorothy Sayers, among others, didn't seem to mind
      > lumping horror fiction and detective stories
      > together.
      >

      It seems like "mystery stories" embraced both crime stories and horror
      stories up to about the mid-20th century.

      The term "thriller" was also used differently. In Britain the term was
      often applied to detective stories. What we today think of as "thrillers"
      were often referred to as "shockers."

      Al


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    • Bob Houk
      I noticed that on the Pulpgen site, in terms of their pulp magazines from the 30s-40s. There was, for example, a group of magazines under the Spicy (meaning
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 1 1:20 AM
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        I noticed that on the Pulpgen site, in terms of their pulp magazines from the 30s-40s. There was, for example, a group of magazines under the 'Spicy' (meaning risque by standards of the time -- pretty mild now) label. Spicy Adventure, Spicy Detective, Spicy Mystery, etc.
        Spicy Detective was just what we would expect -- hard-boiled detective stories.Spicy Mystery, though, was fantasy/horror.
        That threw me off when I first began reading the site last year -- I started to read a few before catching on (I don't like horror stories).
        Great site, by the way.

        -------
        Al: It seems like "mystery stories" embraced both crime stories and horror

        stories up to about the mid-20th century.


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • prettysinister
        Everything listed in your post, Mike, is not really detective fiction or even crime fiction. It s all macabre and supernatural fiction. Man-Size in Marble
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 1 3:04 PM
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          Everything listed in your post, Mike, is not really detective fiction or even crime fiction. It's all macabre and supernatural fiction. "Man-Size in Marble" appeared first in GRIM TALES. It's most defintiely a ghost story. "In the Dark" appeared in FEAR.

          You can read "Man-Size in Marble" for free online at the link below:

          <http://gaslight.mtroyal.ca/mansize.htm>

          I checked on THE MARDEN MYSTERY but I find zero copies of it listed in the worldcat.org database. It probably wasn't published in book format. If it exists at all it was probably published in a newspaper or magazine. Or there maybe a typo in the title which creates havoc with internet and database searches as anyone knows.

          Problem with some of Nesbit's earlier writing is that she collaborated with her husband Hubert Bland using the pseudonym "Fabian Bland." E. Bland was her married name though she never used it when she published. Sayers or some editor must have decided to reveal Nesbit's true name in that Second Omnibus of Crime. I'll have to check my copy when I get home to see how that happened.

          John

          --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "miketooney49" <miketooney49@...> wrote:
          >
          > Does anybody know anything about this author's
          > mystery fiction?
          >
          > Nesbit is most famous for her children's stories,
          > especially THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (1906).
          >
          > But she also produced some stories which saw
          > mystery magazine reprintings:
          >
          > "No. 17": EQMM, August 1951 and June 1963
          > - http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?574889
          >
          > "In the Dark": EQMM, September 1952
          > - http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?767609
          >
          > "Man-Size in Marble": AHMM, November 2001
          > - Online here:
          > - http://tinyurl.com/kpung2k
          > - http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?53422
          >
          > Wikipedia lists among her longer works:
          >
          > 1896: 'The Marden Mystery' (very rare; few if
          > any copies survive)
          > - "E. Nesbit"
          > - http://tinyurl.com/ccfvk7e
          >
          > . . . and her spooky fiction:
          >
          > 1893: 'Something Wrong' (horror stories)
          > 1893: 'Grim Tales' (horror stories)
          > 1897: 'Tales Told in Twilight' (horror stories)
          > 1910: 'Fear' (horror stories)
          > 1983: 'E. Nesbit's Tales of Terror' (reprint of
          > selected horror stories)
          > 1989: 'In the Dark: Tales of Terror' (expansion
          > of 'E. Nesbit's Tales of Terror')
          > 2006: 'The Power of Darkness: Tales of Terror'
          > (expansion of 'In the Dark: Tales of Terror')
          >
          > Ash-Tree Press collected 21 of her stories:
          > - IN THE DARK (2000)
          > - http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?237769
          >
          > E. Nesbit - Summary Bibliography (ISFDB):
          > - http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/ea.cgi?E._Nesbit
          >
          > UNZ index for Edith Nesbit, 43 items:
          > - http://www.unz.org/Author/NesbitEdith?Col=-1
          >
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