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Re: [GAdetection] Freud and the decline of the crime novel

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  • Newton Love
    Allan, I forwarded your post to a good friend who is a French professor ... I will find out more when she returns from her conferences. Me? I m agreeing with
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 18, 2013
      Allan,
      I forwarded your post to a good friend who is a French professor
      of English language detective fiction, and she responded:
      > I am currently spending a week at Cerisy-la-salle
      > for a week's conference on detective fiction and
      > the second conference is all a bunch of
      > pyschotherapists dealing with autofiction
      > :-D LOL

      I will find out more when she returns from her conferences.
      Me? I'm agreeing with you, Allan!

      Blessings on your path,
      Newt


      On 7/18/2013 10:53 AM, Allan Griffith wrote:
      > I mentioned earlier in a post about Gladys Mitchell that I dislike Freudianism in crime fiction.
      >
      > I think Freud must take a large part of the blame for the decline of the crime novel. As his silly pseudoscientific theories became increasingly popular they started to infect literature. With disastrous results.
      >
      > The crime novel became the psychological crime novel, and authors were increasingly intent on inviting us to enter the diseased minds of psychopaths and other anti-social vermin. Even worse they seemed to want us to sympathise with these misfits.
      >
      > Crime fiction became more and more a process of wallowing in the very worst depths of human nature. Even the detectives started to become anti-social misfits.
      >
      > The psychological crime story might have been an interesting novelty for a while but the end result has been to drag crime fiction down into the gutter.
      >
      >
      > Al
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
    • Newton Love
      I forgot to add: Where would we be without FBI and other Profilers? In books, TV, and movies, they are infallible. In reality, profilers help the police, but
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 18, 2013
        I forgot to add:
        Where would we be without FBI and other Profilers? In books, TV,
        and movies, they are infallible. In reality, profilers help the
        police, but are rarely "spot-on" in their assertions.

        Still, profilers are better than psychics.

        Blessings on your paths,
        Newt


        On 7/18/2013 6:17 PM, Newton Love wrote:
        > Allan,
        > I forwarded your post to a good friend who is a French professor
        > of English language detective fiction, and she responded:
        > > I am currently spending a week at Cerisy-la-salle
        > > for a week's conference on detective fiction and
        > > the second conference is all a bunch of
        > > pyschotherapists dealing with autofiction
        > > :-D LOL
        >
        > I will find out more when she returns from her conferences.
        > Me? I'm agreeing with you, Allan!
        >
        > Blessings on your path,
        > Newt
        >
        >
        > On 7/18/2013 10:53 AM, Allan Griffith wrote:
        >> I mentioned earlier in a post about Gladys Mitchell that I dislike Freudianism in crime fiction.
        >>
        >> I think Freud must take a large part of the blame for the decline of the crime novel. As his silly pseudoscientific theories became increasingly popular they started to infect literature. With disastrous results.
        >>
        >> The crime novel became the psychological crime novel, and authors were increasingly intent on inviting us to enter the diseased minds of psychopaths and other anti-social vermin. Even worse they seemed to want us to sympathise with these misfits.
        >>
        >> Crime fiction became more and more a process of wallowing in the very worst depths of human nature. Even the detectives started to become anti-social misfits.
        >>
        >> The psychological crime story might have been an interesting novelty for a while but the end result has been to drag crime fiction down into the gutter.
        >>
        >>
        >> Al
        >>
        >> ------------------------------------
        >>
      • prettysinister
        Anti-social vermin? Wow! You must not use public transportation where you live. You d never survive in Chicago. John
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 19, 2013
          Anti-social vermin? Wow!

          You must not use public transportation where you live. You'd never survive in Chicago.

          John


          --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Allan Griffith <dfordoom@...> wrote:
          >
          > I mentioned earlier in a post about Gladys Mitchell that I dislike
          > Freudianism in crime fiction.
          >
          >
          > I think Freud must take a large part of the blame for the decline of the
          > crime novel. As his silly pseudoscientific theories became increasingly
          > popular they started to infect literature. With disastrous results.
          >
          >
          > The crime novel became the psychological crime novel, and authors were
          > increasingly intent on inviting us to enter the diseased minds of
          > psychopaths and other anti-social vermin. Even worse they seemed to want us
          > to sympathise with these misfits.
          >
          >
          > Crime fiction became more and more a process of wallowing in the very worst
          > depths of human nature. Even the detectives started to become anti-social
          > misfits.
          >
          >
          > The psychological crime story might have been an interesting novelty for a
          > while but the end result has been to drag crime fiction down into the
          > gutter.
          >
          >
          > Al
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • curt evans
          Its a long way from Gladys Mitchell to Jim Thompson though! Im all for letting people “wallow” if they want, but people should be allowed to enjoy their
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 19, 2013
            Its a long way from Gladys Mitchell to Jim Thompson though!

            Im all for letting people “wallow” if they want, but people should be allowed to enjoy their ratiocinative detective stories as well, without being made to feel unworthy.

            Curt

            From: prettysinister
            Sent: Friday, July 19, 2013 12:57 PM
            To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [GAdetection] Re: Freud and the decline of the crime novel


            Anti-social vermin? Wow!

            You must not use public transportation where you live. You'd never survive in Chicago.

            John

            --- In mailto:GAdetection%40yahoogroups.com, Allan Griffith <dfordoom@...> wrote:
            >
            > I mentioned earlier in a post about Gladys Mitchell that I dislike
            > Freudianism in crime fiction.
            >
            >
            > I think Freud must take a large part of the blame for the decline of the
            > crime novel. As his silly pseudoscientific theories became increasingly
            > popular they started to infect literature. With disastrous results.
            >
            >
            > The crime novel became the psychological crime novel, and authors were
            > increasingly intent on inviting us to enter the diseased minds of
            > psychopaths and other anti-social vermin. Even worse they seemed to want us
            > to sympathise with these misfits.
            >
            >
            > Crime fiction became more and more a process of wallowing in the very worst
            > depths of human nature. Even the detectives started to become anti-social
            > misfits.
            >
            >
            > The psychological crime story might have been an interesting novelty for a
            > while but the end result has been to drag crime fiction down into the
            > gutter.
            >
            >
            > Al
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Allan Griffith
            ... I never do! I wouldn t be caught dead using public transportation. Al [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 20, 2013
              On 20 July 2013 03:57, prettysinister <bibliophile61@...> wrote:

              > Anti-social vermin? Wow!
              >
              > You must not use public transportation where you live.


              I never do! I wouldn't be caught dead using public transportation.

              Al


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Allan Griffith
              ... It is a long way, but once we started on the path of psychological crime stories we were always going to end up with Jim Thompson. The trajectory is always
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 20, 2013
                On 20 July 2013 04:39, curt evans <praed_street@...> wrote:

                > Its a long way from Gladys Mitchell to Jim Thompson though!
                >

                It is a long way, but once we started on the path of psychological crime
                stories we were always going to end up with Jim Thompson. The trajectory is
                always downwards.

                Al


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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