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Re: [GAdetection] Gertrude Atherton on Anna Katharine Green and Detective Fiction in 1917

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  • Xavier Lechard
    Well, at least the Nondistracting Puppet doesn t get in the way of a good plot. More seriously, Symons made a similar claim in Bloody Murder. There seem to be
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 10, 2013
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      Well, at least the Nondistracting Puppet doesn't get in the way of a good
      plot.

      More seriously, Symons made a similar claim in Bloody Murder. There seem to
      be a common perception among critics of the traditional mystery that
      readers of that kind of books have no interest whatsoever in "psychology"
      and that it is a bad thing. I disagree on both counts.

      Friendly,
      Xavier


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • curt evans
      Im rather with T. S. Eliot, if you cant do developed characters well, dont try it. He said Freeman Wills Crofts was a better detective novelist than Anna
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 10, 2013
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        Im rather with T. S. Eliot, if you cant do developed characters well, dont try it. He said Freeman Wills Crofts was a better detective novelist than Anna Katharine Green, for what its worth, because Crofts didnt try to do character interest, while Green did and didnt do it well!

        I think one of the funny things about the Atherton criticism is that its clear that Green actually was interested in character. Its one of the things that drew people to her books in the 19th century and again draws them in the 21st.

        But, in any event, I think theres nothing wrong with be “merely” a good puzzle deviser first and foremost. Writers who belittle this quality tend to be writers who cant do it (surprise!).

        Curt

        From: Xavier Lechard
        Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 4:23 AM
        To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Gertrude Atherton on Anna Katharine Green and Detective Fiction in 1917


        Well, at least the Nondistracting Puppet doesn't get in the way of a good
        plot.

        More seriously, Symons made a similar claim in Bloody Murder. There seem to
        be a common perception among critics of the traditional mystery that
        readers of that kind of books have no interest whatsoever in "psychology"
        and that it is a bad thing. I disagree on both counts.

        Friendly,
        Xavier

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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