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Re: Apologies To Mr. Blake

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  • mike5568
    I think Lady In The Morgue by Johnathan Latimer would make a good movie. It has the least amount of humour of all his books, but still contains some and with
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 30, 2002
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      I think Lady In The Morgue by Johnathan Latimer would make a good
      movie. It has the least amount of humour of all his books, but still
      contains some and with its noirish elements, I would like to see it
      in the hands of the Cohen Bros, it would be along the lines of their
      Blood Simple. As for a Merrivale movie, how about the Punch and Judy
      Murders? That would be lively. In the right hands, The Blind Barber
      and Arabian Nights Murder would make great films too. --- In
      GAdetection@y..., "RICHARD LIEDHOLM" <jandrliedholm@m...> wrote:
      > Mike-Anthony Gilbert is an author, for me, which fits the second
      case situation that you describe. I read her book The Black Stage,
      which I kind of liked. But everything afterwards just seemed awful to
      me. While Crook is an interesting change from the Wismey's and
      Poirot's of the mystery world, the stories themselves really lacked
      coherence for me. For example, I didn't like Prelude to Murder or
      Murder Comes Home at all. Both had atmosphere but confusing plots.
      Plus, Crook just spends most of his time being eccentric without much
      credible detection. Like all authors, Gilbert is a taste that some
      like and others do not.
      >
      > I was sad to read the 'ho hum' comments of this group on Blake's
      The Smiler With the Knife, a truly inspired thriller. It is a
      beautifully written story with loads of incident. It would be on the
      top three on my list of Golden Age mystery/thrillers that I would
      film. And if Emily Watson isn't busy in the next six months, sign
      her on!
      >
      > If Hollywood came knocking at you door right now and said: "Mike,
      you pick a mystery and we will film it!" which would you choose?
      >
      > Here are my top three:
      >
      > 1. Phantom Lady by William Irish (yes, there is an adaptation from
      the 40s, but it strayed from the source WAY too often). Oh, and this
      needs to be done period as well. To put it in our modern world would
      not work for me.
      > 2. The Smiler With the Knife by Nicholas Blake
      > 3. Any H.M. story by Carter Dickson, though I think I would stay
      with the novels from the 30s.
      >
      > All my best. I was gone for a week and just finished sifting
      through all the posts. Whew!
      >
      > Richard
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: mike5568
      > Sent: Saturday, November 23, 2002 6:06 PM
      > To: GAdetection@y...
      > Subject: [GAdetection] Apologies To Mr. Blake
      >
      > About 2 or 3 years ago I picked up a trio of books by Nicholas
      > Blake. Read the first one (There`s Trouble Brewing) and for
      whatever
      > reason didn`t like it at all. Gave away the other books (don`t
      even
      > remember what they were). Well, after reading so many positive
      > things about Blake (mainly in this group), I decided to try him
      out
      > again. So I read Smiler With The Knife and while I enjoyed it, it
      was
      > mainly about Mrs. Strangeways, not very much Nigel in the book. So
      I
      > still reserved judgement. Got a good deal on a trio of Blakes
      > (Question Of Proof, Death In A Snowman and Thou Shell Of Death),
      and
      > boy, did I change my mind. Question Of Proof is a very good first
      > novel, Death In A Snowman was enjoyable throughout and Thou Shell
      Of
      > Death goes right into my top ten list. I don`t really know what
      it
      > was about Trouble Brewing when I read it a couple years ago, or
      how
      > you folks would rank it against the other books Blake has
      written.
      > Or maybe it was just me. Has anybody else ever read a book by a
      new
      > author to them and not liked it only to eventually read something
      > else by them and have them become a favorite? Or, on the other
      hand,
      > read an excellent book the first time by an author and then never
      > read anything near as good again by them? I can`t think of any
      > examples of the second case, but in the first case Mr. Blake I
      > apologize and I now have about the next eight of his books in my
      to
      > read pile. Mike B.
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > GAdetection-unsubscribe@y...
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
      Mike- I really enjoyed The Lady in the Morgue as well, and I completely, whole-heartedly agree that the Coen brothers (from my beloved state) would be a great
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 1, 2002
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        Mike- I really enjoyed The Lady in the Morgue as well, and I completely, whole-heartedly agree that the Coen brothers (from my beloved state) would be a great choice to film it. Just last night on one of the cable stations they were showing their recent The Man Who Wasn't There. I saw this film in the theater and enjoyed it a lot. Last night, I was getting wrapped up again in their wonderful characters and storytelling methods. The Coen's, in my mind, also cast better than anyone currently working, which is to say that they cast actors and not movie stars (like Julia Roberts!) And believe me, there is a big difference between the two!

        After sending my e-mail last night, I thought that either The Judas Window or My Late Wives would be a good choice for a first movie. I say this because both seem accessible to both mystery lovers (like us) and the general public who has not spent as many hours reading this type of fiction. I would probably stay away from Plague Court only because H.M. is not as prominent in it-there would need to be lots of re-writes to get him in there sooner.

        All in all, I like your choices and would certainly support those films with my movie-going money.

        Richard

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: mike5568
        Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2002 12:19 AM
        To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [GAdetection] Re: Apologies To Mr. Blake

        I think Lady In The Morgue by Johnathan Latimer would make a good
        movie. It has the least amount of humour of all his books, but still
        contains some and with its noirish elements, I would like to see it
        in the hands of the Cohen Bros, it would be along the lines of their
        Blood Simple. As for a Merrivale movie, how about the Punch and Judy
        Murders? That would be lively. In the right hands, The Blind Barber
        and Arabian Nights Murder would make great films too. --- In
        GAdetection@y..., "RICHARD LIEDHOLM" <jandrliedholm@m...> wrote:
        > Mike-Anthony Gilbert is an author, for me, which fits the second
        case situation that you describe. I read her book The Black Stage,
        which I kind of liked. But everything afterwards just seemed awful to
        me. While Crook is an interesting change from the Wismey's and
        Poirot's of the mystery world, the stories themselves really lacked
        coherence for me. For example, I didn't like Prelude to Murder or
        Murder Comes Home at all. Both had atmosphere but confusing plots.
        Plus, Crook just spends most of his time being eccentric without much
        credible detection. Like all authors, Gilbert is a taste that some
        like and others do not.
        >
        > I was sad to read the 'ho hum' comments of this group on Blake's
        The Smiler With the Knife, a truly inspired thriller. It is a
        beautifully written story with loads of incident. It would be on the
        top three on my list of Golden Age mystery/thrillers that I would
        film. And if Emily Watson isn't busy in the next six months, sign
        her on!
        >
        > If Hollywood came knocking at you door right now and said: "Mike,
        you pick a mystery and we will film it!" which would you choose?
        >
        > Here are my top three:
        >
        > 1. Phantom Lady by William Irish (yes, there is an adaptation from
        the 40s, but it strayed from the source WAY too often). Oh, and this
        needs to be done period as well. To put it in our modern world would
        not work for me.
        > 2. The Smiler With the Knife by Nicholas Blake
        > 3. Any H.M. story by Carter Dickson, though I think I would stay
        with the novels from the 30s.
        >
        > All my best. I was gone for a week and just finished sifting
        through all the posts. Whew!
        >
        > Richard
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: mike5568
        > Sent: Saturday, November 23, 2002 6:06 PM
        > To: GAdetection@y...
        > Subject: [GAdetection] Apologies To Mr. Blake
        >
        > About 2 or 3 years ago I picked up a trio of books by Nicholas
        > Blake. Read the first one (There`s Trouble Brewing) and for
        whatever
        > reason didn`t like it at all. Gave away the other books (don`t
        even
        > remember what they were). Well, after reading so many positive
        > things about Blake (mainly in this group), I decided to try him
        out
        > again. So I read Smiler With The Knife and while I enjoyed it, it
        was
        > mainly about Mrs. Strangeways, not very much Nigel in the book. So
        I
        > still reserved judgement. Got a good deal on a trio of Blakes
        > (Question Of Proof, Death In A Snowman and Thou Shell Of Death),
        and
        > boy, did I change my mind. Question Of Proof is a very good first
        > novel, Death In A Snowman was enjoyable throughout and Thou Shell
        Of
        > Death goes right into my top ten list. I don`t really know what
        it
        > was about Trouble Brewing when I read it a couple years ago, or
        how
        > you folks would rank it against the other books Blake has
        written.
        > Or maybe it was just me. Has anybody else ever read a book by a
        new
        > author to them and not liked it only to eventually read something
        > else by them and have them become a favorite? Or, on the other
        hand,
        > read an excellent book the first time by an author and then never
        > read anything near as good again by them? I can`t think of any
        > examples of the second case, but in the first case Mr. Blake I
        > apologize and I now have about the next eight of his books in my
        to
        > read pile. Mike B.
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > GAdetection-unsubscribe@y...
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
        http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        GAdetection-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • b_ergang
        ... As a matter of fact, Mike, it and two other Latimer books about Bill Crane were filmed in the late Thirties by Universal Studios. Preston Foster starred. I
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 1, 2002
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          --- In GAdetection@y..., "mike5568" <mike5568@y...> wrote:
          > I think Lady In The Morgue by Jonathan Latimer would make a good
          > movie.

          As a matter of fact, Mike, it and two other Latimer books about
          Bill Crane were filmed in the late Thirties by Universal Studios.
          Preston Foster starred. I don't think I've seen any of them, but
          according to the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MYSTERY AND DETECTION, edited by
          Chris Steinbrunner and Otto Penzler, they were as follows:

          "The Westland Case," 1937, based on HEADED FOR A HEARSE.

          "The Lady in the Morgue," 1938.

          "The Last Warning," 1938, based on THE DEAD DON'T CARE.
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