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Re: 'The Cross-Eyed Bear' (1940)

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  • Jeffrey Marks
    Along with Margaret Millar, I believe she s one of the women writers who really need to be rediscovered. I had the good fortune to talk to Hughes about Craig
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2012
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      Along with Margaret Millar, I believe she's one of the women writers who
      really need to be rediscovered. I had the good fortune to talk to Hughes
      about Craig Rice before Hughes passed away. I also found and transcribed 6
      tapes of Hughes being interviewed by a university press. Great information!

      It should be no surprise that she's in Atomic Renaissance.. :)

      Jeff

      --
      Jeffrey Marks
      www.jeffreymarks.com
      Check out my website for news about my books and marketing tips of the month
      Atomic Renaissance: Women Mystery Writers of the 1940s/1950s
      Who Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of the Screwball Mystery
      Anthony Boucher: A Biobibliography -- 2009 Anthony winner


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jon Jermey
      Old news by now, probably, but Hughes also wrote an excellent, though authorised (i.e. sanitised) biography of Erle Stanley Gardner, The Real Perry Mason.
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 26, 2012
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        Old news by now, probably, but Hughes also wrote an excellent, though
        'authorised' (i.e. sanitised) biography of Erle Stanley Gardner, The
        Real Perry Mason.

        Jon.
        >
        >
        > "Dorothy B. Hughes, 88, a mystery writer as well as a critic and
        > historian of mystery fiction, died of complications from a stroke
        > Thursday at her home in Ashland, Ore. She wrote 14 mystery
        > novels, most of them set in the Southwest and involving an
        > upper-class hero caught up in evil intrigue. Her best-known
        > works include 'The Cross-Eyed Bear' (1940), 'Ride the Pink
        > Horse' (1946), 'The Expendable Man' (1964) and 'In a Lonely
        > Place' (1947), which was made into a movie starring Humphrey
        > Bogart."
        >
      • Jeffrey Marks
        Jon, I ve learned in my research that not only was it authorized (which did mean that all references to Erle and Jean were scrubbed), but that Hughes did not
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 27, 2012
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          Jon,

          I've learned in my research that not only was it authorized (which did
          mean that all references to Erle and Jean were scrubbed), but that
          Hughes did not want to scour the 700 boxes at the Ransom Center in
          Texas, so she used an unpublished memoir that Gardner had written for
          most of her book. She did the old change "me" to "him" routine for
          large parts of the book and then added some additional chapters to it
          as well. I was rather disappointed to learn that.

          Jeff

          --
          Jeffrey Marks
          www.jeffreymarks.com
          Check out my website for news about my books and marketing tips of the month
          Atomic Renaissance: Women Mystery Writers of the 1940s/1950s
          Who Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of the Screwball Mystery
          Anthony Boucher: A Biobibliography -- 2009 Anthony winner
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