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Re: [GAdetection] Re: The Maul and the Pear Tree

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  • curt evans
    Conningtons 21 Clues is Hall-Mills. His No Past Is Dead is based on a famous French case. The Ha-Ha Case is based on a famous Scottish case (see my book for
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 5, 2012
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      Conningtons 21 Clues is Hall-Mills. His No Past Is Dead is based on a famous French case. The Ha-Ha Case is based on a famous Scottish case (see my book for more,! ).

      John Rhodes Vegetable Duck is party based on Julia Wallace, The Telephone call completely based on it.

      Curt

      From: juryboxer
      Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2012 1:12 PM
      To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [GAdetection] Re: The Maul and the Pear Tree


      James Sandoe's anthology MURDER PLAIN AND FANCIFUL (1948) includes a feature called "Criminal Clef: Tales and Plays Based on Real Crimes." Some Golden Age examples:
      Anthony Abbot, ABOUT THE MURDER OF THE CLERGYMAN'S MISTRESS (Hall-Mills)
      Anthony Berkeley, THE WYCHFORD POISONING CASE (Maybrick poisoning)
      J.J. Connington, THE TWENTY-ONE CLUES (Hall-Mills per Will Cuppy)
      S.S. Van Dine, THE BENSON MURDER CASE (Joseph Elwell murder)
      Not an easy book to find, I imagine.

      Jon Breen

      --- In mailto:GAdetection%40yahoogroups.com, <bobhouk@...> wrote:
      >
      > I enjoy true crime books as well -- though I disdain the lurid accounting of serial killers that are so popular (INCLUDES 14 PAGES OF CRIME-SCENE PHOTOS!! PREVIOUSLY-UNRELEASED AUTOPSY PICTURES!!)
      >
      > Not surprisingly, perhaps, I most enjoy books about unsolved crimes (e.g., Shephard, Hall-Mills) or those about which legitimate questions remain (e.g., Lindbergh), since these inevitably have a puzzle included.
      >
      > The best such books satisfy the history buff in me as well by giving an insight into the day-to-day lives and mores of the people of the era.
      >
      > In addition to those you mention, Carr of course did The Murder of Sir Edmund Godfrey, and in an earlier time, Poe did The Murder of Marie Roget (well-done recently in The Beautiful Cigar Girl).
      >
      > Are there other examples of mystery novelists dealing with true crime?
      >
      > --- On Fri, 8/3/12, Vegetableduck <praed_street@...> wrote:
      > Golden Age writers actually were quite interested in true crime (Sayers wrote about Julia Wallace, John Street about Constance Kent, for example).





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • bobhouk@yahoo.com
      ... Not an easy book to find, I imagine. Particularly in Cebu City, Philippines, which is where I am at present. Oh well -- add it to the someday list. ...
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 5, 2012
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        >>>
        Not an easy book to find, I imagine.

        Particularly in Cebu City, Philippines, which is where I am at present. Oh well -- add it to the 'someday' list.


        --- On Sun, 8/5/12, juryboxer <juryboxer@...> wrote:

        From: juryboxer <juryboxer@...>
        Subject: [GAdetection] Re: The Maul and the Pear Tree
        To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, August 5, 2012, 1:12 PM
















         









        James Sandoe's anthology MURDER PLAIN AND FANCIFUL (1948) includes a feature called "Criminal Clef: Tales and Plays Based on Real Crimes." Some Golden Age examples:

        Anthony Abbot, ABOUT THE MURDER OF THE CLERGYMAN'S MISTRESS (Hall-Mills)

        Anthony Berkeley, THE WYCHFORD POISONING CASE (Maybrick poisoning)

        J.J. Connington, THE TWENTY-ONE CLUES (Hall-Mills per Will Cuppy)

        S.S. Van Dine, THE BENSON MURDER CASE (Joseph Elwell murder)

        Not an easy book to find, I imagine.



        Jon Breen



        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, <bobhouk@...> wrote:

        >

        > I enjoy true crime books as well -- though I disdain the lurid accounting of serial killers that are so popular (INCLUDES 14 PAGES OF CRIME-SCENE PHOTOS!! PREVIOUSLY-UNRELEASED AUTOPSY PICTURES!!)

        >

        > Not surprisingly, perhaps, I most enjoy books about unsolved crimes (e.g., Shephard, Hall-Mills) or those about which legitimate questions remain (e.g., Lindbergh), since these inevitably have a puzzle included.

        >

        > The best such books satisfy the history buff in me as well by giving an insight into the day-to-day lives and mores of the people of the era.

        >

        > In addition to those you mention, Carr of course did The Murder of Sir Edmund Godfrey, and in an earlier time, Poe did The Murder of Marie Roget (well-done recently in The Beautiful Cigar Girl).

        >

        > Are there other examples of mystery novelists dealing with true crime?

        >

        > --- On Fri, 8/3/12, Vegetableduck <praed_street@...> wrote:

        > Golden Age writers actually were quite interested in true crime (Sayers wrote about Julia Wallace, John Street about Constance Kent, for example).



























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mike Blake
        ... Obviously I can t speak to the Cebu situation, but here in the Northeast U.S. the book was remaindered, and was easily found at one point on bargain tables
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 6, 2012
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          bobhouk wrote:
          > Not an easy book to find, I imagine.
          >
          > Particularly in Cebu City, Philippines, which is where
          > I am at present. Oh well -- add it to the 'someday' list.

          Obviously I can't speak to the Cebu situation, but here in the
          Northeast U.S. the book was remaindered, and was easily found at one
          point on bargain tables everywhere.

          --Mike Blake
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