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  • Last Century Detective
    I have added John Rhode s MURDERS IN PRAED STREET to my collection. It s a good one, right? :)
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 2, 2012
      I have added John Rhode's MURDERS IN PRAED STREET to my collection. It's a good one, right? :)
    • Monte Herridge
      I don t have that one, so it must be a good one. Monte Herridge ... From: Last Century Detective
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 2, 2012
        I don't have that one, so it must be a good one.

        Monte Herridge

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Last Century Detective" <lastcenturydetective@...>


        >I have added John Rhode's MURDERS IN PRAED STREET to my collection. It's a
        >good one, right? :)
        >
        >
      • Last Century Detective
        I found these at a secondhand bookshop and immediately took them with me: Bill Pronzini s QUICKSILVER and EPITAPHS, and Willy Corsari s DE WEDDENSCHAP VAN
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 7, 2012
          I found these at a secondhand bookshop and immediately took them with me:

          Bill Pronzini's QUICKSILVER and EPITAPHS, and Willy Corsari's DE WEDDENSCHAP VAN INSPECTOR LUND (INSPECTOR LUND MAKES A BET). The last title is a short story collection within a novel in which Lund bets that he can tell of a dozen cases, handled over the course of his career, that are as interesting as the ones you read about in detective stories and there's apparently a hidden reason for these stories – and, from what I gathered, one or two of them are locked room mysteries. :)
        • Last Century Detective
          Over the past few weeks, I ve been dropping into secondhand book shops, whenever I came across one, and accumulated the following stack: Erle Stanley Gardner s
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 24, 2012
            Over the past few weeks, I've been dropping into secondhand book shops, whenever I came across one, and accumulated the following stack:

            Erle Stanley Gardner's THE CASE OF THE VELVET CLAWS & THE CASE OF THE DROWSY MOSQUITO.
            Harry Kemelman's FRIDAY THE RABBI SLEPT LATE.
            Janet Asimov's MURDER AT THE GALACTIC WRITERS' SOCIETY.

            I have also ordered several locked room mysteries, including Derek Smith's WHISTLE UP THE DEVIL and Jan Ekström's THE ANCESTRAL PRECIPICE. Yeah, Patrick and John's reviews of those books kept gnawing at me. Good job, guys! ;D

            Comments are always welcome!

            --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Last Century Detective" <lastcenturydetective@...> wrote:
            >
            > I found these at a secondhand bookshop and immediately took them with me:
            >
            > Bill Pronzini's QUICKSILVER and EPITAPHS, and Willy Corsari's DE WEDDENSCHAP VAN INSPECTOR LUND (INSPECTOR LUND MAKES A BET). The last title is a short story collection within a novel in which Lund bets that he can tell of a dozen cases, handled over the course of his career, that are as interesting as the ones you read about in detective stories and there's apparently a hidden reason for these stories � and, from what I gathered, one or two of them are locked room mysteries. :)
            >
          • jeffrey1marks
            As I m sure you know, Velvet Claws is the first Perry Mason, and an interesting book from that standpoint. It s a bit more hardboiled than most of the later
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 25, 2012
              As I'm sure you know, Velvet Claws is the first Perry Mason, and an interesting book from that standpoint. It's a bit more hardboiled than most of the later books. Though Gardner hated the comparisons, it has some similar features to The Maltese Falcon as well.

              Drowsy Mosquito is more typical Gardner, though a bit more personal in that he provides a rather clear picture of his philosophy in the book.

              The Kemelman is one of my favorites.

              Jeff

              --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Last Century Detective" <lastcenturydetective@...> wrote:
              >
              > Over the past few weeks, I've been dropping into secondhand book shops, whenever I came across one, and accumulated the following stack:
              >
              > Erle Stanley Gardner's THE CASE OF THE VELVET CLAWS & THE CASE OF THE DROWSY MOSQUITO.
              > Harry Kemelman's FRIDAY THE RABBI SLEPT LATE.
              > Janet Asimov's MURDER AT THE GALACTIC WRITERS' SOCIETY.
              >
              > I have also ordered several locked room mysteries, including Derek Smith's WHISTLE UP THE DEVIL and Jan Ekström's THE ANCESTRAL PRECIPICE. Yeah, Patrick and John's reviews of those books kept gnawing at me. Good job, guys! ;D
              >
              > Comments are always welcome!
              >
              > --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Last Century Detective" <lastcenturydetective@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I found these at a secondhand bookshop and immediately took them with me:
              > >
              > > Bill Pronzini's QUICKSILVER and EPITAPHS, and Willy Corsari's DE WEDDENSCHAP VAN INSPECTOR LUND (INSPECTOR LUND MAKES A BET). The last title is a short story collection within a novel in which Lund bets that he can tell of a dozen cases, handled over the course of his career, that are as interesting as the ones you read about in detective stories and there's apparently a hidden reason for these stories � and, from what I gathered, one or two of them are locked room mysteries. :)
              > >
              >
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