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Re: [GAdetection] Re: Austin Freeman (Augusta Groner, J.O. Curwood and Robert Reeve)

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  • Jon Jermey
    You can find the following free to download at Gutenberg (along with many Craig Kennedy books). http://tinyurl.com/3s6wvqs Books by Colbron, Grace Isabel Case
    Message 1 of 11 , May 4, 2011
      You can find the following free to download at Gutenberg (along with
      many Craig Kennedy books). http://tinyurl.com/3s6wvqs

      Books by Colbron, Grace Isabel
      Case of the Lamp That Went Out by Auguste Groner
      17 downloads
      Case of the Golden Bullet by Auguste Groner
      16 downloads
      Case of the Registered Letter by Auguste Groner
      10 downloads
      Case of the Pocket Diary Found in the Snow by Auguste Groner
      10 downloads
      Case of the Pool of Blood in the Pastor's Study by Auguste Groner

      Most (all?) of the Thorndyke books are available from Gutenberg
      Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/plusfifty-a-m.html#letterF

      Incidentally, writers like Norbert Davis and Craig Rice are now starting
      to appear among the cheap ebooks on the Barnes and Noble website:
      unfortunately for me they are only available for purchase in the US at
      the moment.

      Jon.

      On 04/05/11 04:34, Last Century Detective wrote:
      > Leonaur has reprinted the complete cases of Craig Kennedy in six
      > handsome volumes, both softcover and hardback, and many other unusual
      > detective stories – and wanted the groups advise on some of them.
      >
      > They published two volumes of stories of Augusta Groner's "Detective
      > Müller: Imperial Austrian Police" and four volumes of "The Mounted
      > Police Novels" by James Oliver Curwood, and I wanted to know if they're
      > any good.
      >
      > The first volume of The Imperial Austrian Police stories:
      > <http://www.leonaur.co.uk/books/booknumber.php?bookid=669>
      >
      > The first volume of The Mounted Police stories:
      > <http://www.leonaur.co.uk/books/booknumber.php?bookid=573>
      >
      > In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com <mailto:GAdetection%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > "Enrique F Bird" <enfbirdp@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Friends,
      > >
      > >
    • prettysinister
      First, thanks for enlightening me, TC, about yet another small press reissuing forgotten books. I may be purchasing some of their editions. Second, I would
      Message 2 of 11 , May 4, 2011
        First, thanks for enlightening me, TC, about yet another small press reissuing "forgotten books." I may be purchasing some of their editions.

        Second, I would not classify Curwood as a detective writer. His Steele of the Royal Mounted is more of an adventure tale with criminous aspects. Detection is barely present. But if you want to learn how the RCMP functioned in the early 20th century this has some interesting history. I don't know how accurate it is, but it'll erase all thoughts of Dudley Do-Right from your mind (if you know those cartoons).

        John

        (And I think you meant Arthur Reeve so I corrected the name in the subject line.)


        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Last Century Detective" <lastcenturydetective@...> wrote:
        >
        > Leonaur has reprinted the complete cases of Craig Kennedy in six handsome volumes, both softcover and hardback, and many other unusual detective stories – and wanted the groups advise on some of them.
        >
        > They published two volumes of stories of Augusta Groner's "Detective Müller: Imperial Austrian Police" and four volumes of "The Mounted Police Novels" by James Oliver Curwood, and I wanted to know if they're any good.
        >
        > The first volume of The Imperial Austrian Police stories: <http://www.leonaur.co.uk/books/booknumber.php?bookid=669>
        >
        > The first volume of The Mounted Police stories:
        > <http://www.leonaur.co.uk/books/booknumber.php?bookid=573>
        >
        >
        >
        > In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Enrique F Bird" <enfbirdp@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Friends,
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I like Freeman and what has made me appreciate him even more is having read the first 2 volumes of Craig Kennedy short stories. You might see him as the contemporative American equivalent of Dr. Thorndyke, but upon reading them, Reeve’s science ultimately seems science-fictionish while Freeman’s always seems genuine.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I do recommend giving Craiig Kennedy a try â€" although as to plot apart from the “science” the stories are almost all too simple, they are evocative of a different age. And very readable. Incidentally, John Dickson Carr seems to have been a fan in his “Grandest Game” essay.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > By the way, I have read somewhere that “The Mystery of 31, New Inn” was the first written novel, which is why I specified “published”. At any rate, TRTM does introduce some of the supporting characters which reappear throughout the years.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Best regards,
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Enrique F. Bird
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > From: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com [mailto:GAdetection@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of watchcarefully@
        > > Sent: Tuesday, May 03, 2011 11:12 AM
        > > To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Re: Austin Freeman
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I've read nearly all the Thordyke tales and love them. Upon famliarity with his style, the formula becomes obvious, but the quaintness of the period shines through and the early examples of use of scientific methods is noteworthy. One of my favorites is the later title Mr Pottermack's Oversight. I agree that reading the Red Thumb mark first is a good plan. The many RAF short stories are also fun reads.
        > >
        > > While reading these 3 authors it may also be interesting to observe the influences of Conan Doyle on RAF as well as what I perceive to be HC Bailey's occasional jabs at the style of Freeman/Thorndyke.
        > > Brad
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: Last Century Detective <lastcenturydetective@ <mailto:lastcenturydetective%40yahoo.com> >
        > > To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com <mailto:GAdetection%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Tue, May 3, 2011 10:48 am
        > > Subject: [GAdetection] Re: Austin Freeman
        > >
        > > In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com <mailto:GAdetection%40yahoogroups.com> , "Enrique F Bird" <enfbirdp@> wrote:
        > >
        > > > You should try "The Red Tzhumb Mark" first - it is the first published
        > > > novel. Although some may find it dissapointing, the date it is from makes it
        > > > a classic together with Freeman's writing ability. I never found it boring
        > > > nor tedious.
        > > >
        > > > Enrique F. Bird
        > >
        > > I thought "The Mystery of 31, New Inn" was the first full-length Thorndyke novel?
        > >
        > > "The Red Thumb Mark" is still very readable today, but, as a detective story, its only interesting point is its historical value as one of the first books in the genre that took a in-depth look at fingerprinting as a mean to identify of exonerate suspects.
        > >
        > > I haven't read the other two titles you listed, but I can enthusiastically recommend "The Eye of Osiris" â€" one of the best Pre-GAD era mysteries.
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
      • Last Century Detective
        You re welcome, John. I have their complete sets of Bigger s Charlie Chan mysteries, Hornung s criminal exploits of Raffles, Doyle s scientific adventures of
        Message 3 of 11 , May 4, 2011
          You're welcome, John. I have their complete sets of Bigger's Charlie Chan mysteries, Hornung's criminal exploits of Raffles, Doyle's scientific adventures of Professor Challenger and Burrough's Complete Land That Time Forgot saga – and they're all high quality editions.

          Thanks for clarifying Curwood's position within the mystery genre, and I guess that makes Groner a prime candidate for sampling.


          --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "prettysinister" <bibliophile61@...> wrote:
          >
          > First, thanks for enlightening me, TC, about yet another small press reissuing "forgotten books." I may be purchasing some of their editions.
          >
          > Second, I would not classify Curwood as a detective writer. His Steele of the Royal Mounted is more of an adventure tale with criminous aspects. Detection is barely present. But if you want to learn how the RCMP functioned in the early 20th century this has some interesting history. I don't know how accurate it is, but it'll erase all thoughts of Dudley Do-Right from your mind (if you know those cartoons).
          >
          > John
          >
          > (And I think you meant Arthur Reeve so I corrected the name in the subject line.)
          >
          >
          > --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Last Century Detective" <lastcenturydetective@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Leonaur has reprinted the complete cases of Craig Kennedy in six handsome volumes, both softcover and hardback, and many other unusual detective stories – and wanted the groups advise on some of them.
          > >
          > > They published two volumes of stories of Augusta Groner's "Detective Müller: Imperial Austrian Police" and four volumes of "The Mounted Police Novels" by James Oliver Curwood, and I wanted to know if they're any good.
          > >
          > > The first volume of The Imperial Austrian Police stories: <http://www.leonaur.co.uk/books/booknumber.php?bookid=669>
          > >
          > > The first volume of The Mounted Police stories:
          > > <http://www.leonaur.co.uk/books/booknumber.php?bookid=573>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Enrique F Bird" <enfbirdp@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Friends,
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > I like Freeman and what has made me appreciate him even more is having read the first 2 volumes of Craig Kennedy short stories. You might see him as the contemporative American equivalent of Dr. Thorndyke, but upon reading them, Reeve’s science ultimately seems science-fictionish while Freeman’s always seems genuine.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > I do recommend giving Craiig Kennedy a try â€" although as to plot apart from the “science” the stories are almost all too simple, they are evocative of a different age. And very readable. Incidentally, John Dickson Carr seems to have been a fan in his “Grandest Game” essay.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > By the way, I have read somewhere that “The Mystery of 31, New Inn” was the first written novel, which is why I specified “published”. At any rate, TRTM does introduce some of the supporting characters which reappear throughout the years.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Best regards,
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Enrique F. Bird
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > From: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com [mailto:GAdetection@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of watchcarefully@
          > > > Sent: Tuesday, May 03, 2011 11:12 AM
          > > > To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
          > > > Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Re: Austin Freeman
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > I've read nearly all the Thordyke tales and love them. Upon famliarity with his style, the formula becomes obvious, but the quaintness of the period shines through and the early examples of use of scientific methods is noteworthy. One of my favorites is the later title Mr Pottermack's Oversight. I agree that reading the Red Thumb mark first is a good plan. The many RAF short stories are also fun reads.
          > > >
          > > > While reading these 3 authors it may also be interesting to observe the influences of Conan Doyle on RAF as well as what I perceive to be HC Bailey's occasional jabs at the style of Freeman/Thorndyke.
          > > > Brad
          > > >
          > > > -----Original Message-----
          > > > From: Last Century Detective <lastcenturydetective@ <mailto:lastcenturydetective%40yahoo.com> >
          > > > To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com <mailto:GAdetection%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > > Sent: Tue, May 3, 2011 10:48 am
          > > > Subject: [GAdetection] Re: Austin Freeman
          > > >
          > > > In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com <mailto:GAdetection%40yahoogroups.com> , "Enrique F Bird" <enfbirdp@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > > You should try "The Red Tzhumb Mark" first - it is the first published
          > > > > novel. Although some may find it dissapointing, the date it is from makes it
          > > > > a classic together with Freeman's writing ability. I never found it boring
          > > > > nor tedious.
          > > > >
          > > > > Enrique F. Bird
          > > >
          > > > I thought "The Mystery of 31, New Inn" was the first full-length Thorndyke novel?
          > > >
          > > > "The Red Thumb Mark" is still very readable today, but, as a detective story, its only interesting point is its historical value as one of the first books in the genre that took a in-depth look at fingerprinting as a mean to identify of exonerate suspects.
          > > >
          > > > I haven't read the other two titles you listed, but I can enthusiastically recommend "The Eye of Osiris" â€" one of the best Pre-GAD era mysteries.
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Bevis
          I thought the best of Freeman s inverted novels was the 1925 The Shadow of The Wolf which was an extended version of his 1912 novella The Dead Hand
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 22, 2013
            I thought the best of Freeman's inverted novels was the 1925 "The
            Shadow of The Wolf" which was an extended version of his 1912 novella
            " The Dead Hand" published in Pearson's in two parts. Taking place on
            the Cornish coast it's a good nautical story beautifully written.

            Bev
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