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Re: [GAdetection] Modern Cozy

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  • Allen Askew
    Curt, I do read Beaton s books, they are a fun, light reading that do not over tax the mind, and I tend to read them inbetween reading my locked room books,
    Message 1 of 89 , May 4, 2011
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      Curt,
      I do read Beaton's books, they are a fun, light reading that do not over tax the mind, and I tend to read them inbetween reading my locked room books, carr, hare, brand etc
       
       
       
       
      Allen.

      --- On Wed, 4/5/11, curt evans <praed_street@...> wrote:


      From: curt evans <praed_street@...>
      Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Modern Cozy
      To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, 4 May, 2011, 1:32


       



      I found a list, Cozies: 22 Core Titles, at libraryjournal.com:

      Susan Wittig Albert, The Table of Hill Top Farm (Beatrix Potters solves murders, along with her animals, apparently—this sounds horribly cute)
      M. C. Beaton, the Quiche of Death (I’ve been put off this series by the fact the protagonist is named Agatha Raisin—the author, Marion Chesney, also does the Hamish Macbeth—another rather twee name—books that were televised in Britain)
      Lawrence Block, Burglars Can’t Be Choosers
      Lilian Jackson Braun, The Cat Who Read Backwards (more animals solving crime, how I don’t know)
      Diane Mott Davidson, Catering to Nobody (recipes included)
      Carolyn G. Hart, Death on Demand
      Charlotte MacLeod, The Family Vault
      Dorothy L. Sayers, Whose Body?
      Josephine Tey, The Daughter of Time (seems an odd choice)
      Emily Arsenault, The Broken Teaglass
      Alan Bradley, The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie (I like this series, charming)
      Laura Childs, Death by Darjeeling (all the ones in this series involve a Charleston teashop—nothing cozier than tea!)
      Jane Cleland, Consigned to Death (antiques)
      Elizabeth Duncan, The Cold Light of Mourning (involves a nail care shop)
      Tarquin Hall, The Case of the Missing Servant (Indian cozy)
      Alexander McCall, The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency
      Ian Samson, The Case of the Missing Books
      Maggie Sefton, Knit One, Kill Two (recipes AND kitting patterns)
      Leonie Swann (sheep solves a murder in this one, actual sheep, you know, the fuzzy white things that are easily led and go baaaa)
      Richard Yancey, The Highly Effective Detective

      Curt

      From: Xavier Lechard
      Sent: Tuesday, May 03, 2011 5:39 AM
      To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Modern Cozy

      Curt wrote:

      "Has anyone ever attempted to determine the favorite so-called cozy writers
      over the last thirty years (since the demise of Christie of Marsh)?"

      That "cozy" concept has always been puzzling to me. If you take the Agatha
      Awards as a reference, you find yourself with writers that can reasonably
      labeled as cozy (Carolyn G. Hart, Nancy Pickard) but also others for whom
      the label is much more debatable such as Sharyn McCrumb or Laura Lippman.
      Interestingly, the author most responsible for the rebirth and rise of
      "cozy" mystery writing, Charlotte MacLeod, never won a competitive Agatha.

      Friendly,
      Xavier

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    • Jon Jermey
      Illustrated by Edward Gorey, of course. Jon.
      Message 89 of 89 , Oct 27, 2014
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        Illustrated by Edward Gorey, of course.

        Jon.

        On 28/10/14 01:24, Mary Reed maywrite@... [GAdetection] wrote:
         

        A Narrative Involving Criminal Intent sounds like the title of a lost Victorian detective story. Possibilities there for an interesting novel...

        As ever
        Mary R

         
        So I don't understand what ditching the regular, mainstream crime-and thriller novels (after all that pandering) will achieve them in the long run. Do they seriously just want to read serious literature and pick out the pieces that makes it qualify as "A Narrative Involving Criminal Intent"? That sure sounds exciting.



        Posted by: Mary Reed <maywrite@...>

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