Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [GAdetection] Carolyn Wells

Expand Messages
  • Nick Fuller
    Books with Carolyn Wells s bookplate include: Leroux s Mystery of the Yellow Room Green s Amethyst Box Phillpotts s Found Drowned Masterman s Wrong Letter The
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 4, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Books with Carolyn Wells's bookplate include:

      Leroux's Mystery of the Yellow Room
      Green's Amethyst Box
      Phillpotts's Found Drowned
      Masterman's Wrong Letter


      The Masterman novel isn't listed on the library catalogue, so presumably there are other books from her collection.  I have a feeling that some of the Crofts novels are hers.  I wonder whether she read Carr or Christie?

      This is intriguing and exciting.


      --- On Sun, 4/4/10, Vegetableduck <praed_street@...> wrote:

      From: Vegetableduck <praed_street@...>
      Subject: [GAdetection] Carolyn Wells
      To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
      Received: Sunday, 4 April, 2010, 3:15 AM







       









      Doug, it would be nice to know she returned the favor, wouldn't it? I loved your anecdote about how Carr struggle to get those Wells books shipped.



      Nick should write a piece on Wells' mystery library, I would love to know who she read. I know she liked Phoebe Atwood Taylor's mysteries and read Van Dine (but everybody read Van Dine for a time).



      I don't personally see her as a good writer myself (though she has considerable camp value, as Bill Pronzini has noted, particularly in the later books), but she's a significant figure in the genre. Perhaps what struck me most about her books is that in them she exhibits the stereotypes of the British Golden Age more than most British writers do. I reviewed a couple of her books over at mysteryfile; it was a lot of fun writing those reviews.



      How did her library end up in Australia, anyway?



      Curt



      --- In GAdetection@ yahoogroups. com, "Douglas G." <crippenlandru@ ...> wrote:

      >

      > Nick --Any John Dickson Carr volumes in Wells' library?

      >

      > Doug G

      >

      > --- In GAdetection@ yahoogroups. com, Nick Fuller <nicodemus_au@ > wrote:

      > >

      > > This will particularly interest Mike (and possibly Curt and Doug):

      > >

      > > The University of Sydney has Carolyn Wells's collection of her own books in the rare books section.  It also has, scattered through the open access shelves, her copies of other authors' books.  I borrowed Walter S. Masterman's Wrong Letter (1926), and discovered that it was Wells's copy.  On the front page, Wells had written:

      > >

      > > Wrong Letter

      > > Big Bow [i.e., Israel Zangwill's Big Bow Mystery]

      > > Spooky Hollow [by Wells]

      > >

      > > Spooky Hollow was published in 1923, three years before Masterman's novel.  Wells either saw these three novels as in the same line of detective fiction, or as sharing similar plots.  Big Bow and Wrong Letter (preface by Chesterton, but rather disappointing) use the same solution to their locked room mystery, and the murderer's identity is similar.  Has anyone read Spooky Hollow?  How does it compare?

      > >

      > > Nick

      > >

      > > --- On Fri, 2/4/10, nzkpzq <mike@> wrote:

      > >

      > > From: nzkpzq <mike@>

      > > Subject: [GAdetection] Round-up

      > > To: GAdetection@ yahoogroups. com

      > > Received: Friday, 2 April, 2010, 7:33 PM

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >  

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > My favorite of the C.L. Pirkis short stories is "The Redhill Sisterhood". Reading this years ago in one of Hugh Greene's "Rival of Sherlock Holmes" anthologies was an eye-opener. It got me deeply interested in Sherlock Holmes era detective fiction - the period before the Golden Age.

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > The three Madelyn Mack tales read here seem less interesting. More are available now on the Internet. Keep meaning to read them all...

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > Only read Carr's "The Corpse in the Waxworks" once, around 1977. Found it too lurid back then, and not interesting. My favorite Carr tales of sleuth Bencolin are novel "The Lost Gallows" and short story "The Shadow of the Goat" (in the collection "The Door to Doom"). Both of these are highly recommended.

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > "Appleby Talks About Crime" (the new Crippen & Landru collection) is most enjoyable. Innes is not a writer I've read much. Will be reading more soon by him. Nice fun!

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > Mike Grost

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > History of Mystery:

      > >

      > > http://mikegrost. com/classics. htm

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > The Jacob Black "Impossible Crime" Short Stories:

      > >

      > > http://mikegrost. com/mymyst. htm

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      > >

      >

























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.