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Re: Review: Fielding, A -- Death of John Tait (1932)

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  • Vegetableduck
    This is a quite hilarious review. My favorite Fielding is The Upfold Farm Mystery. It has one of the most breathtakingly unlikely solutions of any detective
    Message 1 of 49 , Mar 31, 2010
      This is a quite hilarious review. My favorite Fielding is The Upfold Farm Mystery. It has one of the most breathtakingly unlikely solutions of any detective novel I have ever read.

      Curt

      --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, jon <jonjermey@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Fielding, A <http://gadetection.pbworks.com/Fielding%2C-A> -- Death of
      > John Tait (1932)
      >
      > The Queen of Red Herrings is back. elaborating what seems at first like
      > a simple domestic dispute into an elaborate story of betrayal,
      > toxicology, blackmail, impersonation, abduction and sinister foreigners.
      > John Tait is a middle-aged Lothario (in a mild English way) who has
      > already jilted two women -- the cold Lady Ida and his cousin-by-marriage
      > Etta Naylor -- when he becomes engaged to a widow, Mrs Burnham. As
      > John's wealthy stepmother, Lady Tait, dotes on him to the degree of
      > disinheriting her own nieces and nephews, the prospect of his having an
      > heir puts the family's backs up, and by page ten Etta and the other
      > cousins are already discussing murder.
      >
      > For anyone else this would be quite enough plot to go on with, but
      > Fielding is only warming up. Soon we encounter a glamorous adventuress,
      > a gigolo who works in a chemist's shop, a suicide that looks like a
      > murder, an Arabian fortune-teller, Lady Tait's disinherited and dubious
      > grandson, his fiery Italian mother, an actor with broken fingernails, a
      > unique method of poisoning, a Poison Unknown to Science (but not to Dr
      > Angelli, who luckily happens to be on hand to identify it), a secretly
      > confined lunatic, a dashing explorer, a chewed fountain-pen top, and a
      > brilliant detective called Superintendent Pointer who can identify who
      > chewed it simply by /looking/ at the culprit. There is even a twist at
      > the end, as if there were anything left to twist.
      >
      > There is a good deal of naive charm about Fielding's insistence that her
      > readers should get value for their money. The best thing about this
      > book, in fact, is the way Pointer plods amiably through this whole
      > hysterical gallimaufry -- even into extreme personal danger -- without
      > batting an eyelid. To see him at work one would think cases like this
      > came across his desk every day. They don't make detectives like that any
      > more.
      >
      > Jon.
      >
    • miketooney49
      ... and was reviewed here: http://stkarnick.com/culture/2010/01/14/radio-days-thrillers-from-crippen-landru/
      Message 49 of 49 , May 6, 2010
        ... and was reviewed here:

        http://stkarnick.com/culture/2010/01/14/radio-days-thrillers-from-crippen-landru/

        ===================================

        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "nzkpzq" <mike@...> wrote:
        >
        > 11. On which radio show did Craig Rice's detective John J. Malone make a
        > "celebrity guest appearance"?
        >
        > "The Casebook of Gregory Hood" (1946), written by Anthony Boucher and Denis Green, who had previously partnered on the Sherlock Holmes radio show.
        >
        > Gregory Hood was a sophisticated importer in San Francisco, who solved mysteries each week as an amateur sleuth. In "The Double Diamond", he gets help from John J. Malone, during a flight that stops over in Chicago.
        >
        > Boucher knew Craig Rice personally, and mentions her in his reviews collected in THE BOUCHER CHRONICLES.
        >
        > "The Casebook of Gregory Hood" is available in book form from publishers Crippen & Landru.
        >
        > Mike Grost
        >
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