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English village settings

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  • Françoise Thomas-Eschaux de Maisons
    My query will certainly seem silly to most of you but the members of this group are as certainly the only ones who are able to give me an unquestionable
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 19, 2010
      My query will certainly seem silly to most of you but the members of this group are as certainly the only ones who are able to give me an unquestionable answer.

      I am doing some research for a paper about British, mostly English, literature around English villages, their lives and the lives of their inhabitants. I started with Jane Austen's "Emma", though it could perhaps have sprung from "The Vicar of Wakefield", down to "Cranford" of course, and thought while reading about the beginning of the twentieth century of Auden's sentence so often quoted: "For me, as for many others, the reading of detective stories, is an addiction like tobacco or alcohol ... the story must conform to certain formulas (I find it very difficult, for example, to read one that is not set in rural England)".

      Agatha Christie and Miss Marple sprung to my mind because of Saint-Mary-Mead. I thought also about some of Patricia Wentworth's novels figuring Miss Silver and jumped to the more recent Caroline Grahame's Midsomer Murders or the Agatha Raisin series. I am aware that they are not of the same quality both on the stylistic and plotting level but I must emphasize that I am interested in the setting and the depiction of characters and life found in English villages.

      Could there be better examples of what I am searching in "detective stories"? My knowldge is ecclectic but not reliable as I am absolutely no expert in this matter. And would be you be kind enough to give me some hints about further readings and references or paths to follow?

      Many thanks to all.
      Francoise




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • lizzie hayes
      Hi Francoise   In addition to teh Agatha Christie ones I have these listed.   GODFREY. Thomas (ED) English Country House Murders Anthology DICKINSON.
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 19, 2010
        Hi Francoise
         
        In addition to teh Agatha Christie ones I have these listed.
         









        GODFREY. Thomas (ED)

        English Country House Murders
        Anthology








        DICKINSON. Peter  
        1982
        The Last House Party









        GRAHAM. Caroline
        1990
        Murder at Madingly Grange
        DCI Barnaby

        DUNN. Carola
        1994
        Death at Wentwater Court
        Daisy Dalrymple-England 1920's








        HARE. Cyril 
        1951
        An English Murder
         
        You might already have them.
         
        Best
        Lizzie
        Mystery Women Group
        lizziehayes@...
        http://www.mysterywomen.co.uk

        --- On Fri, 2/19/10, Françoise Thomas-Eschaux de Maisons <francoise.thomaseschauxdemaisons@...> wrote:


        From: Françoise Thomas-Eschaux de Maisons <francoise.thomaseschauxdemaisons@...>
        Subject: [GAdetection] English village settings
        To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, February 19, 2010, 10:35 PM


         



        My query will certainly seem silly to most of you but the members of this group are as certainly the only ones who are able to give me an unquestionable answer.

        I am doing some research for a paper about British, mostly English, literature around English villages, their lives and the lives of their inhabitants. I started with Jane Austen's "Emma", though it could perhaps have sprung from "The Vicar of Wakefield", down to "Cranford" of course, and thought while reading about the beginning of the twentieth century of Auden's sentence so often quoted: "For me, as for many others, the reading of detective stories, is an addiction like tobacco or alcohol ... the story must conform to certain formulas (I find it very difficult, for example, to read one that is not set in rural England)".

        Agatha Christie and Miss Marple sprung to my mind because of Saint-Mary-Mead. I thought also about some of Patricia Wentworth's novels figuring Miss Silver and jumped to the more recent Caroline Grahame's Midsomer Murders or the Agatha Raisin series. I am aware that they are not of the same quality both on the stylistic and plotting level but I must emphasize that I am interested in the setting and the depiction of characters and life found in English villages.

        Could there be better examples of what I am searching in "detective stories"? My knowldge is ecclectic but not reliable as I am absolutely no expert in this matter. And would be you be kind enough to give me some hints about further readings and references or paths to follow?

        Many thanks to all.
        Francoise

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Christine
        You might try the Mrs. Malory series by Hazel Holt.     Christine Britain ________________________________ From: Françoise Thomas-Eschaux de Maisons
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 20, 2010
          You might try the Mrs. Malory series by Hazel Holt.
           
           
          Christine Britain







          ________________________________
          From: Françoise Thomas-Eschaux de Maisons <francoise.thomaseschauxdemaisons@...>
          To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, February 19, 2010 5:35:31 PM
          Subject: [GAdetection] English village settings

           
          My query will certainly seem silly to most of you but the members of this group are as certainly the only ones who are able to give me an unquestionable answer.

          I am doing some research for a paper about British, mostly English, literature around English villages, their lives and the lives of their inhabitants. I started with Jane Austen's "Emma", though it could perhaps have sprung from "The Vicar of Wakefield", down to "Cranford" of course, and thought while reading about the beginning of the twentieth century of Auden's sentence so often quoted: "For me, as for many others, the reading of detective stories, is an addiction like tobacco or alcohol ... the story must conform to certain formulas (I find it very difficult, for example, to read one that is not set in rural England)".

          Agatha Christie and Miss Marple sprung to my mind because of Saint-Mary-Mead. I thought also about some of Patricia Wentworth's novels figuring Miss Silver and jumped to the more recent Caroline Grahame's Midsomer Murders or the Agatha Raisin series. I am aware that they are not of the same quality both on the stylistic and plotting level but I must emphasize that I am interested in the setting and the depiction of characters and life found in English villages.

          Could there be better examples of what I am searching in "detective stories"? My knowldge is ecclectic but not reliable as I am absolutely no expert in this matter. And would be you be kind enough to give me some hints about further readings and references or paths to follow?

          Many thanks to all.
          Francoise

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • lux2lane
          Dorothy L Sayers: The Nine Tailors (1934, a Lord Peter Wimsey novel. Classic set up: death in a remote village, winter, a Big House (ie, home of the squires,
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 20, 2010
            Dorothy L Sayers: The Nine Tailors (1934, a Lord Peter Wimsey novel. Classic set up: death in a remote village, winter, a Big House (ie, home of the squires, not a prison!), church with splendidly eccentric rector, and villagers who play important roles in the story and are not just there for local colour. Some people, I have to say, loathe it. Me, I love it, but I'm a person of simple tastes.
            A Presumption of Death (2002)is a mystery novel by the English writer Jill Paton Walsh which uses Sayers's main creations (Wimsey and - as the main character - his wife Harriet Vane) and is set in a village early in the Second World War. It catches very well the mixture of fear and defiance and pragmatism with which people at the time reacted to the upheavals of war and the probability (as it seemed then) of a German invasion.
            Margery Allingham set some of her Albert Campion novels in rural East Anglia, but though there are villages and villagers, village life isn't really central to the stories, except perhaps in her final Campion novel, A Cargo of Eagles (1968), about rum goings-on in a small coastal village, Saltey. Although remote, it is no longer inaccessible in the way the countryside of her earlier novels was: a biker gang from London plays a large part in the story, and there is an oddly depressing housing development in progress, although progress is too strong a word for the sense of apathy that hangs over it. It is a village undergoing change, not, one senses, for the better.
            Allingham also wrote a well-received non-fiction book about a village in wartime. Commissioned by her American publisher, The Oaken Heart was published in 1941, so deals with much the same period as Presumption of Death.
            Finally, in A Hearse on May-Day (1972), Gladys Mitchell lands her young heroine (great-niece of Mitchell's detective Dame Beatrice Bradley) in the sort of isolated, inward-looking village that one fervently hopes never to run out of petrol (gas) in - especially on the eve of May Day...

            L2L
          • Nick Fuller
            Curt has already suggested a couple of Streets.  I would strongly recommend Burton s Early Morning Murder, in which the detection is atypically subdued, and
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 20, 2010
              Curt has already suggested a couple of Streets.  I would strongly recommend Burton's Early Morning Murder, in which the detection is atypically subdued, and the emphasis is on the characterisation.  Murder, M.D. is also excellent.

              Also:
              Bailey: The Great Game, No Murder
              Blake: The Dreadful Hollow, The Deadly Joker
              Bush: TCOT Unfortunate Village, TCOT Platinum Blonde
              Coles: The Man from the River
              Almost anything by J.J. Connington
              Mitchell: The Mystery of a Butcher's Shop, The Saltmarsh Murders, The Devil at Saxon Wall, Dead Men's Morris, Late, Late in the Evening, Uncoffin'd Clay (not very good)

              --- On Fri, 19/2/10, Françoise Thomas-Eschaux de Maisons <francoise.thomaseschauxdemaisons@...> wrote:

              From: Françoise Thomas-Eschaux de Maisons <francoise.thomaseschauxdemaisons@...>
              Subject: [GAdetection] English village settings
              To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
              Received: Friday, 19 February, 2010, 10:35 PM







               









              My query will certainly seem silly to most of you but the members of this group are as certainly the only ones who are able to give me an unquestionable answer.



              I am doing some research for a paper about British, mostly English, literature around English villages, their lives and the lives of their inhabitants. I started with Jane Austen's "Emma", though it could perhaps have sprung from "The Vicar of Wakefield", down to "Cranford" of course, and thought while reading about the beginning of the twentieth century of Auden's sentence so often quoted: "For me, as for many others, the reading of detective stories, is an addiction like tobacco or alcohol ... the story must conform to certain formulas (I find it very difficult, for example, to read one that is not set in rural England)".



              Agatha Christie and Miss Marple sprung to my mind because of Saint-Mary-Mead. I thought also about some of Patricia Wentworth's novels figuring Miss Silver and jumped to the more recent Caroline Grahame's Midsomer Murders or the Agatha Raisin series. I am aware that they are not of the same quality both on the stylistic and plotting level but I must emphasize that I am interested in the setting and the depiction of characters and life found in English villages.



              Could there be better examples of what I am searching in "detective stories"? My knowldge is ecclectic but not reliable as I am absolutely no expert in this matter. And would be you be kind enough to give me some hints about further readings and references or paths to follow?



              Many thanks to all.

              Francoise



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • linia_my
              I am aware that they are not of the same quality both on the stylistic and plotting level but I must emphasize that I am interested in the setting and the
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 21, 2010
                I am aware that they are not of the same quality both on the
                stylistic and plotting level but I must emphasize that I am interested in the setting and the depiction of characters and life found in English villages.

                Could there be better examples of what I am searching in "detective stories"?

                And would be you be kind enough to give me some hints about further readings and references or paths to follow?

                Francoise


                Based on your post,you highlighted that you are interested in the characters and setting of English village rather than plot in the detective/mystery books.

                My recommendation as per below.

                Hazel Holt books.
                Ann Purser books.
                Betty Rowland books.

                The books are better examples of life in English village with strong on characters and setting rather than plot.The books are relatively very easy to get.There is no point of trying to get the obscure detective/mystery books just for your research if plot and era are not your priority.

                I strongly suggest you to further read the non-mystery fictions below:

                Books by:

                Miss Read
                Ann Purser
                Flora Thompson
                Gail Fraser
                Laurie Lee
                Rebecca Shaw
                Eve Houston
                Lilian Harry
              • Françoise Thomas-Eschaux de Maisons
                Dear All, thank you very much for your help. Some if you expanded it to give me some ideas of other books that are non detective fiction and I am very grateful
                Message 7 of 15 , Feb 23, 2010
                  Dear All,

                  thank you very much for your help. Some if you expanded it to give me some ideas of other books that are non detective fiction and I am very grateful to them (many thanks Linia!) for this kind thought that enriched an always growing list!

                  However, my primary aim in writing to this group was to get a firmer grasp upon the way detection as a literary genre dealt, from its beginning, with English village life. My idea was that beneath the gentle and cosy surface of village life, changes were happening and even village life was moving along with the times. Therefore, it would have been natural to see a "realist" school deling with these changes while another school turned towards nostalgia and a probable idealist golden age would go on or revert to the stock characters of the vicar, the Manor house and squire, the school, pastures greeen, etc.

                  But I am certainly going further than the "Golden Age" of detection, though it seems that Agatha Christie herself showed throughout her long writing career that post WWI village life was decidedly different from the Edwardian times and post WWII was even more different - see, for instance, the long ring Miis Marple's maids and then the need to find domestic help from temporary housekeepers till chars when one was lucky to secure one.

                  As I have said before, I am no expert in detective literature but it is an important part of what has been reading food since the first decades of the XXth century at least and I have a feeling that one part of it evolved with the times and recorded or included society changes while another trend was deliberately turning its back to modern times and keep to the "idyllic" formula of beforehand giving comfort to readers. There is no judgement passed on both ways, should they exist.

                  Would you agree with this surmise?

                  Francoise





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • linia_my
                  Spot on, Francoise!
                  Message 8 of 15 , Feb 24, 2010
                    Spot on, Francoise!

                    --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Françoise Thomas-Eschaux de Maisons <francoise.thomaseschauxdemaisons@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear All,
                    >
                    > thank you very much for your help. Some if you expanded it to give me some ideas of other books that are non detective fiction and I am very grateful to them (many thanks Linia!) for this kind thought that enriched an always growing list!
                    >
                    > However, my primary aim in writing to this group was to get a firmer grasp upon the way detection as a literary genre dealt, from its beginning, with English village life. My idea was that beneath the gentle and cosy surface of village life, changes were happening and even village life was moving along with the times. Therefore, it would have been natural to see a "realist" school deling with these changes while another school turned towards nostalgia and a probable idealist golden age would go on or revert to the stock characters of the vicar, the Manor house and squire, the school, pastures greeen, etc.
                    >
                    > But I am certainly going further than the "Golden Age" of detection, though it seems that Agatha Christie herself showed throughout her long writing career that post WWI village life was decidedly different from the Edwardian times and post WWII was even more different - see, for instance, the long ring Miis Marple's maids and then the need to find domestic help from temporary housekeepers till chars when one was lucky to secure one.
                    >
                    > As I have said before, I am no expert in detective literature but it is an important part of what has been reading food since the first decades of the XXth century at least and I have a feeling that one part of it evolved with the times and recorded or included society changes while another trend was deliberately turning its back to modern times and keep to the "idyllic" formula of beforehand giving comfort to readers. There is no judgement passed on both ways, should they exist.
                    >
                    > Would you agree with this surmise?
                    >
                    > Francoise
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • luis molina
                    I will began to read the 3 RMPFarrer  books. How good are they? [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Message 9 of 15 , Feb 24, 2010
                      I will began to read the 3 RMPFarrer  books. How good are they?




















                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • jon
                      Because of the actions of a few stupid and greedy people I have had to lock some of the Wiki pages from modification. This includes the home page, the side bar
                      Message 10 of 15 , Feb 26, 2010
                        Because of the actions of a few stupid and greedy people I have had to
                        lock some of the Wiki pages from modification. This includes the home
                        page, the side bar and all pages leading directly off the home page. If
                        you need to modify these please let me know your Wiki username and I
                        will grant you the necessary permissions. The offenders have been
                        blocked from Wiki access.

                        [Insert rant about how a few morons can spoil things for everyone here]

                        Regards,

                        Jon.
                      • Vegetableduck
                        Jon, what were the actions of these people, or did you not want to be more specific? Curt
                        Message 11 of 15 , Feb 26, 2010
                          Jon, what were the actions of these people, or did you not want to be more specific?

                          Curt

                          --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, jon <jonjermey@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Because of the actions of a few stupid and greedy people I have had to
                          > lock some of the Wiki pages from modification. This includes the home
                          > page, the side bar and all pages leading directly off the home page. If
                          > you need to modify these please let me know your Wiki username and I
                          > will grant you the necessary permissions. The offenders have been
                          > blocked from Wiki access.
                          >
                          > [Insert rant about how a few morons can spoil things for everyone here]
                          >
                          > Regards,
                          >
                          > Jon.
                          >
                        • Robert
                          Jon, Well, sounds like it was something more than simply writing inaccurate information or making poorly thought-out arguements or mis-understanding broadly
                          Message 12 of 15 , Feb 28, 2010
                            Jon,

                            Well, sounds like it was something more than simply writing inaccurate information or making poorly thought-out arguements or mis-understanding broadly understood principles....was it just mean and viscous stuff or blatent self-promotion or both???

                            Bob

                            --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, jon <jonjermey@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Because of the actions of a few stupid and greedy people I have had to
                            > lock some of the Wiki pages from modification. This includes the home
                            > page, the side bar and all pages leading directly off the home page. If
                            > you need to modify these please let me know your Wiki username and I
                            > will grant you the necessary permissions. The offenders have been
                            > blocked from Wiki access.
                            >
                            > [Insert rant about how a few morons can spoil things for everyone here]
                            >
                            > Regards,
                            >
                            > Jon.
                            >
                          • jon
                            There were two issues. Some people put blatant links to their own sites in prominent locations like the SideBar, which I can understand if not sympathise with.
                            Message 13 of 15 , Feb 28, 2010
                              There were two issues. Some people put blatant links to their own sites
                              in prominent locations like the SideBar, which I can understand if not
                              sympathise with. But others seem to have gone into the source code of
                              some fairly obscure pages and inserted invisible links to sites of their
                              own as a hit-boosting measure for marketing. Any revenue they made from
                              this can't have been more than -- literally -- pennies per year I still
                              find it hard to believe that anyone could have wasted their time and
                              mine by doing anything so utterly pointless, but they did. (I find
                              myself looking for a hidden agenda: why THIS page? But it all seems to
                              be totally random.)

                              The dark apostles of 'search engine optimisation' are making real money
                              by selling futile 'secrets' like this. They are the villains, of course:
                              the operatives who do the vandalism are merely their brainless tools.

                              Jon.

                              Robert wrote:
                              > Jon,
                              >
                              > Well, sounds like it was something more than simply writing inaccurate information or making poorly thought-out arguements or mis-understanding broadly understood principles....was it just mean and viscous stuff or blatent self-promotion or both???
                              >
                              > Bob
                            • pennsnakes
                              ... New list member here, just a couple thoughts that may or may not be of interest. This sort of spam is often bot-originated, so usually automated. Their
                              Message 14 of 15 , Mar 1, 2010
                                > But others seem to have gone into the source code of some fairly obscure pages and inserted invisible links to sites of their own as a hit-boosting measure for marketing. Any revenue they made from this can't have been more than -- literally -- pennies per year I still find it hard to believe that anyone could have wasted their time and mine by doing anything so utterly pointless, but they did. (I find myself looking for a hidden agenda: why THIS page? But it all seems to be totally random.)>


                                New list member here, just a couple thoughts that may or may not be of interest. This sort of spam is often bot-originated, so usually automated. Their purpose is not so much to get people to click links, but to put in a few hidden links that they hope won't get noticed. The more links to a site (whether or not anyone clicks on them), the higher the page rank, and Google lists them higher in search results. So it can be quite remunerative for them (the bots usually target a few hundred wikis at a time.) The best way to combat this is putting tighter restrictions on wiki access.

                                BTW, I'm a POD publisher, working on a few classic mystery reprint collections. One I'm putting together is a volume including both of the Thornley Colton titles. I noticed on the GADetection wiki (and quite a few other places) that Silver Sandals is given as the alternate (US) title for Thornley Colton, Blind Reader of Hearts. Actually, Thornley Colton, Blind Reader of Hearts was later published in the US as Thornley Colton, Blind Detective. Someone with wiki access may wish to correct this.

                                Chad
                                CoachwhipBooks.com
                              • jon
                                Done, Chad, thanks. Access to the individual author pages on the Wiki is still unrestricted, though I will be looking for evidence that new applicants are
                                Message 15 of 15 , Mar 1, 2010
                                  Done, Chad, thanks. Access to the individual author pages on the Wiki is
                                  still unrestricted, though I will be looking for evidence that new
                                  applicants are genuine.

                                  Jon.

                                  pennsnakes wrote:
                                  > BTW, I'm a POD publisher, working on a few classic mystery reprint collections. One I'm putting together is a volume including both of the Thornley Colton titles. I noticed on the GADetection wiki (and quite a few other places) that Silver Sandals is given as the alternate (US) title for Thornley Colton, Blind Reader of Hearts. Actually, Thornley Colton, Blind Reader of Hearts was later published in the US as Thornley Colton, Blind Detective. Someone with wiki access may wish to correct this.
                                  >
                                  > Chad
                                  > CoachwhipBooks.com
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