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Trial by Fury (1941) Craig Rice

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  • Jeffrey Marks
    Curt, you re absolutely right. I found the drinking much more prevalent and obvious than it had been in other books to the point of bothering me. The dog is an
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 6, 2010
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      Curt, you're absolutely right. I found the drinking much more prevalent and
      obvious than it had been in other books to the point of bothering me.

      The dog is an inspired creation indeed, and it was a shame that he could not
      appear in more books. Rice did not use many animals in her stories, but she
      did it well when she did.

      Craig was born in Chicago, but spent many years in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin
      growing up. She used a few family names from her hometown for the book. It
      in some ways reminded me of EQ's Wrightsville where the small town portrayal
      has a veneer of shine over some rather ugly things going on.

      Jeff

      --
      Jeffrey Marks
      www.jeffreymarks.com
      Check out my website for news about my books and marketing tips of the month
      Atomic Renaissance: Women Mystery Writers of the 1940s/1950s
      Who Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of the Screwball Mystery
      Anthony Boucher: A Biobibliography -- 2009 Anthony winner


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Vegetableduck
      Jeff, I look forward to reading your book, what a colorful life the author had! I am amazed by the amount of drinking, it s more than what you have in Hammett
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 7, 2010
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        Jeff,

        I look forward to reading your book, what a colorful life the author had!

        I am amazed by the amount of drinking, it's more than what you have in Hammett and Chandler and other American authors, or so it seems to me. In John Dickson Carr books, for example, people may ACT drunk, but I don't believe they usually are in fact (Blind Barber excepted). Rice must have been writing her life to some extent (though Hammett, Chandler and Carr all were alcoholics too). It's amazing she managed to be so productive so much of the time given her personal issues.

        By the way, does "Knocked for a Loop" have the Justuses as well or just Malone? Why did she have that sudden spurt of novels (Loop, Hearse, April Robin) before her death? Her production, at least of novels, seems to have really slowed after after 1945, until the year of her death (was Fourth Postman the only novel in that period--the gadetection site seems to have jumbled the publication years). Looks like almost everything came out during the WW2 period, amazing.

        Curt

        Curt

        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Marks <jeffrmarks@...> wrote:
        >
        > Curt, you're absolutely right. I found the drinking much more prevalent and
        > obvious than it had been in other books to the point of bothering me.
        >
        > The dog is an inspired creation indeed, and it was a shame that he could not
        > appear in more books. Rice did not use many animals in her stories, but she
        > did it well when she did.
        >
        > Craig was born in Chicago, but spent many years in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin
        > growing up. She used a few family names from her hometown for the book. It
        > in some ways reminded me of EQ's Wrightsville where the small town portrayal
        > has a veneer of shine over some rather ugly things going on.
        >
        > Jeff
        >
        > --
        > Jeffrey Marks
        > www.jeffreymarks.com
        > Check out my website for news about my books and marketing tips of the month
        > Atomic Renaissance: Women Mystery Writers of the 1940s/1950s
        > Who Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of the Screwball Mystery
        > Anthony Boucher: A Biobibliography -- 2009 Anthony winner
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • luis molina
        Jeff, I look forward to reading your book, what a colorful life the author had! IDo read it, its very goooood! [Non-text portions of this message have been
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 7, 2010
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          Jeff, I look forward to reading your book, what a colorful life the author had!


          IDo read it, its very goooood!




















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jeffrey1marks
          Curt, Yes, both later Malone novels, Knocked for a Loop and Kingdom for a Hearse have both the Justeses and Malone in them. In 1945, Rice divorced Larry
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 8, 2010
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            Curt,

            Yes, both later Malone novels, Knocked for a Loop and Kingdom for a Hearse have both the Justeses and Malone in them. In 1945, Rice divorced Larry Lipton, and her depression spiraled out of control. She made many bad life choices and ended up in a sanitarium for her health. The nurses didn't let her drink and she dried out. While there, she began to write again. She wrote novella versions of later novels in the sanitarium, which she later converted.

            Jeff

            --
            Jeffrey Marks
            www.jeffreymarks.com
            Check out my website for news about my books and marketing tips of the month
            Atomic Renaissance: Women Mystery Writers of the 1940s/1950s
            Who Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of the Screwball Mystery
            Anthony Boucher: A Biobibliography -- 2009 Anthony winner
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